Google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U

19.09.2021 5 Comments

google chrome to crack pdf password  - Crack Key For U

If you want to know about the best ZIP password remover on the internet, Important Tip: Google Chrome is a free solution to remove PDF. 1. Remove password PDF file by browser (Google Chrome, Coc Coc, FireFox, Edge). Step 1: you right click on PDF files with password and choose. However, there are times when a password-protected PDF document becomes a cause of annoyance. In fact, if you lose or forget the password, you.

: Google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U

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How to Remove Password from PDF File – No App (Easy)

Google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U -

Update: October 2019

Are you wondering How to remove Password from PDF file without using any software or the pdf password unlocker tools. All you need is the Google Chrome browser to Crack / Bypass PDF password.

The  PDF format is mostly used to send and share documents with friends, colleagues and exchange documents securely regardless of operating system used by the sender and receiver. PDF was invented by Adobe. Now PDF is an open standard with which in addition to including text or images, it is possible to add links, buttons or form fields, audio, video, etc. They can be signed electronically and if we add some more security, you can protect them with a password.

Also Read:

Create Keyboard shortcut to open programs or folder (windows).

How to convert Text into Audio with notepad.

Surely it has all happened to us that we have received an email with an attached PDF that when we open it asks us to enter a password if we want to view it. If the sender has not provided it to us. We will have to contact that sender to give it to us. In this way we can open the PDF on several occasions.How to remove Password from PDF file without using any software or the pdf password unlocker tools

This can be quite uncomfortable whether we have to consult it often, as if we are only going to open it from time to time. It continually ask the password every time you want to open. This trick will help to view the document when you don’t remember the password or lost/forgot password.

Protecting the PDF file during shipping can be a good idea to prevent the message is intercepted by third parties. remove password from pdf without software.

There are some free pdf password remover tools that allows us to remove password protection from a PDF. However, we can also use Google chrome to remove password from PDF. Lets see how to do Step By Step.

Remove password from PDF using Chrome


Since Google Chrome is the most used, we will show below a simple trick to remove the password from a PDF from the Google browser.

 Step: 1  Just “Right click’ on the password protected PDF document from your computer. And select “Open with>” Then select Chrome.free pdf password remover

 Step: 2  Now chrome asks for enter the password and which is protected you are viewing the document. Now Click on the option “Print” or manually enter into print mode by pressing “Ctrl+P”.  Now change the destination as “Save As PDF” save the file in your local disk.Remove password from PDF using Chrome

 Step: 3  Once done saving the PDF file go to the PDF file saved path. Then open the PDF file by simply double-clicking on it.

 Step: 4  Thats it guys now it opens without having to enter the password.

Note: Windows 10 has the Microsoft Print to PDF printer installed by default. If you have another version of Windows. Only have to indicate when it’s time to print you have to select saved as a PDF.

We can also use other browsers such as Microsoft Edge or Mozilla Firefox and follow the same steps from Google Chrome to remove the password of a PDF. You can also use Pdf unlock tool by https://smallseotools.com/unlock-pdf/, It’s totally free and easy to use & also tell us your story have you ever face these password problems on PDF?.

Gabriel Chaves

Источник: https://techindroid.com/remove-password-pdf-without-software/

Google Chrome Privacy Whitepaper

Last modified: February 4, 2021 (Current as of Chrome 87.0.4280.141)

This document describes the features in Chrome that communicate with Google, as well as with third-party services (for example, if you've changed your default search engine). This document also describes the controls available to you regarding how your data is used by Chrome. Here we’re focusing on the desktop version of Chrome; we touch only tangentially on Chrome OS and Chrome for Mobile. This document does not cover features that are still under development, such as features in the beta, dev and canary channel and active field trials, or Android apps on Chrome OS if Play Apps are enabled.

If you have a question about Google Chrome and Privacy that this document doesn’t answer, please feel free to ask it in the Community Forum. If you want to report a privacy issue, you can file it in our public bug tracker. For issues that include confidential information, please use this link. We’d be happy to hear from you.

Omnibox

Google Chrome uses a combined web address and search bar (we call it the “omnibox”) at the top of the browser window.

As you use the omnibox, your default search engine can suggest addresses and search queries that may be of interest to you. These suggestions make navigation and searching faster and easier, and are turned on by default. They can be turned off by unchecking "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings.

Omnibox

When not in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome sends the text you've typed into the omnibox, along with a general categorization (e.g., "URL", "search query", or "unknown"), to your default search engine. Chrome will also send a signal to your default search engine when you focus in the omnibox, telling it to get ready to provide suggestions. That signal includes the URL of the currently displayed search engine results page. Your IP address and certain cookies are also sent to your default search engine with all requests, in order to return the results that are most relevant to you.

To provide suggestions and search results faster, Chrome may preconnect to your default search engine in the background. Chrome will not preconnect if you have either turned off “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Cookies” part of “Privacy and security” section or "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings. When Chrome preconnects, it resolves the search engine’s IP address and connects it to the search engine, exposing your IP address.

When in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome relies on an on-device model that does not communicate with your default search engine until you select a suggestion.

If Chrome determines that your typing may contain sensitive information, such as authentication credentials, local file names, or URL data that is normally encrypted, it will not send the typed text.

If Google is your default search engine, when you select one of the omnibox suggestions, Chrome sends your original search query, the suggestion you selected, and the position of the suggestion back to Google. This information helps improve the quality of the suggestion feature, and it's logged and anonymized in the same manner as Google web searches. Logs of these suggestion requests are retained for two weeks, after which 2%% of the log data is randomly selected, anonymized, and retained in order to improve the suggestion feature.

If you've chosen to sync your Chrome history, and if Google is your default search engine, the URL of the page you’re viewing is sent to Google in order to provide better, contextually relevant suggestions. URLs are sent only for HTTP pages and HTTPS pages, not other schemes such as file: and ftp:. Additionally, Chrome may present website and search query suggestions as soon as you place the cursor in the omnibox, before you start typing. Chrome is in the process of transitioning to a new service to provide these on-focus suggestions. For most users on desktop versions of Chrome, the request and complete set of suggestions are retained on Google servers in order to further improve and personalize the feature. When the URL that triggered the set of suggestions is deleted from your history, the set of suggestions will stop influencing suggestions personalized to you, and will be deleted; otherwise they are retained in your Google account for a year. For a small portion of users on desktop versions of Chrome, and users on mobile versions of Chrome, the logging described in the previous paragraphs apply except that URLs are never included in the 2%% sampling of log data.

On Android, your location will also be sent to Google via an X-Geo HTTP request header if Google is your default search engine, the Chrome app has the permission to use your geolocation, and you haven’t blocked geolocation for www.google.com (or country-specific origins such as www.google.de). Additionally, if your device has network location enabled (High Accuracy or Battery Saving Device Location mode in Android settings), the X-Geo header may also include visible network IDs (WiFi and Cell), used to geocode the request server-side. The X-Geo header will never be sent in Incognito mode. HTTPS will be required to include this header in the request. You can learn more about how to control the Android OS location sharing with apps on this article for Nexus, or find your device here if you do not use a Nexus. How to control location sharing with a site within Chrome is written in this article. See the Geolocation section of this whitepaper for more information on default geolocation permissions.

Additionally, if Google is your default search engine and you have enabled sync, omnibox may also show suggestions for your Google Drive files. You can turn this functionality off by disabling the “Drive suggestions” option in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings.

If you use a non-Google search provider as your default search engine, queries are sent and logged under that provider's privacy policy.

Additionally, when you use the omnibox to search for a single word, Chrome may send this word to your DNS server to see whether it corresponds to a host on your network, and may try to connect to the corresponding host. This gives you the option to navigate to that host instead of searching. For example, if your router goes by the hostname “router”, and you type “router” in the omnibox, you’re given the option to navigate to https://router/, as well as to search for the word “router” with your default search provider. This feature is not controlled by the "Use a prediction service to help complete searches and URLs..." option because it does not involve sending data to your default search engine.

Network predictions

Chrome uses a service to predict which resources and pages are likely to be needed next in order to load pages more quickly. The prediction service uses navigation history, local heuristics, and data learned from Google’s search crawlers. Retrieving the data from Google's crawlers requires sending the URL of the current page to Google, and so it is only used if you’ve opted into "Make Searches and Browsing Better (Sends URLs of the pages you visit to Google)" and/or enabled Lite Mode. The prediction service may initiate actions such as DNS prefetching, TCP and TLS preconnection, and prefetching of web pages. To turn off network predictions, uncheck “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Privacy and security > Cookies” section of Chrome’s settings on desktop, in the “Privacy” section of Chrome’s settings on Android, and in the “Bandwidth” section of Chrome’s settings on iOS.

To improve load times, the browser can be asked to prefetch links that you might click next. Chrome supports five types of prefetching:

  • Chrome prefetching - can be initiated by Chrome itself whenever it detects a search query typed in the omnibox, a likely beginning of a URL you type often in the omnibox, or when you have Lite mode enabled and are visiting Google Search.
  • Webpage prefetching - requested by one web page to prefetch another
  • AMP prefetching - can be requested only by the Google Search App on Android to prefetch several accelerated mobile pages (AMP) articles and display them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • CustomTabs prefetching - any Android app can request to prefetch several URLs to speed up displaying them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • Privacy-preserving search result link prefetching - can be initiated by Chrome on Google Search result pages to prefetch links to other websites.

Four mechanisms preserve user privacy for search result link prefetches:

  • Prefetching is restricted to domains for which Chrome doesn’t have a corresponding cookie.
  • Passive fingerprinting surfaces such as User-Agent are bucketed or set to fixed values.
  • Prefetches are limited to HTTPS links and tunneled through a CONNECT proxy operated by Google. Consequently, the TLS connection is established between Chrome and the origin so the proxy server cannot inspect the traffic, and requests to the origin come from a Google IP address instead of the user’s IP address. Google only learns about the destination domain and sub-resource domains that will be prefetched, which Google already knows because it generated the Search results page and crawled the page, respectively.
  • Prefetched resources and cookies set by the prefetched domain are only persisted when you click the search result and visit the prefetched domain.

Controlling the feature. All prefetching types except webpage prefetching are controlled by Chrome’s prediction service setting. Webpage prefetching is allowed regardless of whether Chrome’s network prediction service feature is enabled.

Handling of cookies. Except for the privacy-preserving search result link prefetching case, the prefetched site is allowed to set and read its own cookies even if you don’t end up visiting the prefetched page, and prefetching is disabled if you have chosen to block third-party cookies. In the privacy-preserving search result link prefetching case, prefetching is disabled if you have a cookie for the site, and the site can only set a cookie once you click on the link that was prefetched.

Javascript execution. For AMP prefetching the page is fully rendered and Javascript is also executed. For the remaining types of prefetching Javascript is not executed.

Google search locale

If Google is set as your default search engine, Chrome will try to determine the most appropriate locale for Google search queries conducted from the omnibox in order to give you relevant search results based on your location. For example, if you were in Germany, your omnibox searches may go through google.de instead of google.com.

In order to do this, Chrome will send a request to google.com each time you start the browser. If you already have any cookies from the google.com domain, this request will also include these cookies, and is logged as any normal HTTPS request to google.com would be (see the description of “server logs” in the privacy key terms for details). If you do not have any cookies from google.com, this request will not create any.

New Tab page

The Chrome New Tab page may display suggestions for websites that you might want to visit.

In order to help you get started, Chrome may suggest content that is popular in your country or region. Chrome uses your IP address to identify your country or region.

Chrome tries to make personalized suggestions that are useful to you. For this, Chrome uses the sites you have visited from your local browsing history. On Android, the most popular languages of the sites you visited may also be sent to Google to provide suggestions in languages you prefer to read, and the device display DPI may be sent to format content for your device. To save data, Chrome may additionally send a hash of the content that Google provided to you the last time, so that you only download content when there is something new.

If you are signed into Chrome, suggestions are also based on data stored in your Google account activity. You can control the collection of data in your Google account at Activity controls and manage your account activity at My Activity. For example, if you sync your browsing history and have enabled its use in your Web & App activity, Google may suggest sites that relate to sites you have visited in the past. Chrome measures the quality of suggestions by sending Google information about the sets of suggestions that were displayed, and those that were selected.

On the desktop version of Chrome, you may also manually add shortcuts to websites that you regularly visit, or edit Chrome’s existing website suggestions. After you add, edit, or delete a shortcut to a website, the Chrome New Tab page will not suggest any new websites to you.

Suggestions generated from your browsing history will be removed once you clear your browsing history. However, if you customized your suggestions, they will not be removed.

For Chrome on Android, in certain countries, Chrome may download the content of the New Tab page suggestions from Google, for use while offline. Chrome sends to Google a cookieless request with the URL for each suggestion, along with Chrome’s user agent string, in order to render the content. You can remove downloaded content by clearing Chrome’s cache data, or by opening the Downloads menu and selecting individual pages to delete. You can disable this feature by disabling “Download articles for you on Wi-Fi” in Chrome’s Downloads settings.

On mobile versions of Chrome, if you’re signed in to Chrome and have the Web & App activity setting enabled for your account, your preferences for the suggested articles can be modified or removed using the “Manage Interests” option from the three dots menu. Your preferences will be sent to Google so that better suggestions are provided to you in the future. For example, if you indicate that you’re not interested in a particular topic or publisher, suggestions about that topic or publisher will not be shown in the future. Likewise, you can indicate that you’re not interested in a specific article via the “Hide story” option in the article’s three dots menu. Suggestions are also personalized based on your interactions with the suggested articles (for example, tapping on or ignoring an article). You can manage this interaction data, which is stored in the Discover section of your Google account, at My Activity. Google may use anonymized and aggregated interest and interaction data from you to improve the quality of suggested articles for other users. For instance, if you view or open a suggestion it might be suggested more often, while if you report its contents as inappropriate it might stop being suggested.

For desktop and Android versions of Chrome, when you open a new tab, Chrome loads a New Tab page customized by your default search engine (e.g., google.com) if it’s available. This page is preloaded in the background and refreshed periodically so that it opens quickly. Your IP address and cookies, as well as your current browser theme, are sent to your search engine with each refresh request so that the New Tab page can be correctly displayed. See the Embedded Search API for more details. Your search engine may also record your interactions with the New Tab page.

The New Tab page content may be designed by your default search provider. Suggested websites are embedded by Chrome into the New Tab page in a way that does not expose them to your default search provider.

If your default search provider is Google, the New Tab page also contains a web address and search bar that behaves like the omnibox.

This information about the New Tab page may not apply if you've installed an extension that overrides the New Tab page.

Touch to Search

If you've enabled "Touch to Search" on Chrome Mobile you can search for terms by selecting them.

When you select a word, the word, the surrounding text, the languages you speak (from Chrome's Languages settings), and the home country of your device's SIM card are sent to Google to identify recommended search terms (for example, selecting "whale" on a site about the blue whale would lead to the selection expanding to show "blue whale"). The selected word is logged in accordance with standard Google logging policies, and the surrounding text and home country are logged only when the page is already in Google's search index. If you have turned on “Make searches and browsing better”, the URL of the page is also sent and logged, and is used to improve your query suggestions.

When Google returns a search suggestion, a card appears that may present an action or additional information related to the search. Opening this card is considered a regular search and navigation on Google, so standard logging policies apply.

Adjusting a selection causes a search for the exact selection. For example, if the user selects "climate" and the selection is automatically expanded to "climate change", the user can adjust the selection back to just "climate" and opening the panel would show full search results for "climate" rather than "climate change". Saying “Ok Google” after selecting a word provides the word and its surrounding text as context for the Google Assistant.

Touch to Search is enabled in a limited mode by default: potentially privacy-sensitive data, such as the URL and surrounding text, is not sent for HTTPS pages. Touch to Search can be fully enabled and disabled in the card or in the Chrome privacy settings.

Search with Google Lens

On Android Chrome, if Google is selected as the default search engine and a recent version of the Google app is installed on your device, touching & holding on an image will present you with an option to initiate a search with Google Lens.

A tap on that menu item will redirect you to the Lens experience in the Google App and the image bytes of the selected image will be sent to the Google Lens app. For non-incognito users, the name of the currently signed-in account (if applicable), image tag attributes, and Chrome experiments may also be sent to the Google App. This information is used to improve the user experience within the Lens app.

Triggering a Lens search is considered a regular search and navigation on Google, so standard logging policies apply.

Safe Browsing protection

Google Chrome includes an optional feature called "Safe Browsing" to help protect you against phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or extensions. You can find more information at safebrowsing.google.com about how Safe Browsing protects you in Chrome and other Google products. Safe Browsing is designed specifically to protect your privacy and is also used by other popular browsers.

You can find settings for Safe Browsing in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome’s settings. When Safe Browsing is enabled in the “Standard protection” mode (pictured below), Chrome contacts Google's servers periodically to download the most recent Safe Browsing list of unsafe sites including sites associated with phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or Chrome extensions. The most recent copy of this list is stored locally on your system. Chrome checks the URL of each site you visit or file you download against this local list. If you navigate to a URL that appears on the list, Chrome sends a partial URL fingerprint (the first 32 bits of a SHA-256 hash of the URL) to Google for verification that the URL is indeed dangerous. Chrome also sends a partial URL fingerprint when a site requests a potentially dangerous permission, so that Google can protect you if the site is malicious. Google cannot determine the actual URL from this information.

In addition to the URL check described above, Chrome also conducts client-side checks. If a website looks suspicious, Chrome sends a subset of likely phishing and social engineering terms found on the page to Google, in order to determine whether the website should be considered malicious. These client-side checks also include comparisons of the visual appearance of the page to a list of images of login pages. If a website appears similar to a page on this list, Chrome will send the URL and the matched entry on the list to Google to determine whether the page is a likely phishing attempt. Chrome can also help protect you from phishing if you type one of your previously saved passwords into an uncommon site. In this case Chrome sends the URL and referrers of the page to Google to see if the page might be trying to steal your password.

If you encounter a website that is on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you may see a warning like the one shown below.

Malware

You can visit our malware warning test page or social engineering warning test page to see the above example in action. For more information about the warning pages, see Manage warnings about unsafe sites.

Additionally, if you've opted into “Make Searches and Browsing Better (sends URLs of the pages you visit to Google)”, Chrome sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you visit a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list of safe sites in order to gather the latest reputation of that website (we call this mechanism “real-time checks”). If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, this request also contains a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account to provide better protections to some users whose account may be under attack. If the website is deemed unsafe by Safe Browsing, you may see a warning like the one shown above. This mechanism is designed to catch unsafe sites that switch domains very quickly or hide from Google's crawlers. Pages loaded in Incognito are not checked using this mechanism.

You can also opt in to reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and security on the Internet. You can opt in by turning on the “Help improve security on the web for everyone” setting in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome's settings. You can also opt in from the warning page shown above. If you opt in, Chrome will send an incident report to Google every time you receive a warning, visit a suspicious page, and on a very small fraction of sites where Chrome thinks there could be threats, to help Safe Browsing learn about the new threats you may be encountering. Additionally, some downloaded files that are suspicious and show a warning may be sent to Google for investigation each time they are encountered. All reports are sent to Google over an encrypted channel and can include URLs, headers, and snippets of content from the page and they never include data from browsing you do in Incognito mode. If Chrome discovers unwanted or malicious software on your machine, the reports may also include details about malicious files and registry entries. This data is used only to improve Safe Browsing and to improve security on the Internet. For example, Chrome reports some SSL certificate chains to Google to help improve the accuracy of Chrome’s SSL warnings. As part of Certificate Transparency, Chrome also reports to Google a sampling of information about SSL certificates and any observed signed certificate timestamps (SCTs). These reports help Google verify that the third-party logs in the Certificate Transparency system are behaving honestly, which helps ensure that HTTPS connections can be trusted. Chrome does not send reports for connections authenticated with certificates that chain to locally installed roots.

Please be aware that if you disable the Safe Browsing feature, Chrome will no longer be able to protect you from websites that try to steal your information or install harmful software. We don't recommend turning it off.

If you are a webmaster, developer, or network admin, you can find more relevant information about Safe Browsing on this page.

Safe Browsing also protects you from abusive extensions and malicious software. When Chrome starts, and on each update of the Safe Browsing list, Chrome scans extensions installed in your browser against the Safe Browsing list. If an extension on the list is found, Chrome will disable the extension, offer you relevant information and may provide an option for you to remove the extension or re-enable it. Chrome also sends the particular extension ID to Safe Browsing.Extensions can also be disabled by Chrome if they're determined to be malicious during an update. If you attempt to download a file on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you'll see a warning like this one:

This file is malicious, and Chrome has blocked it.

To warn you about potentially dangerous files, like the picture shown above, Chrome checks the URL of potentially dangerous file types you download against a list of URLs that have been verified. Potentially dangerous file types include both executables and commonly-abused document types. This list is stored locally on your computer and updated regularly. Chrome does not send information to Google for files you download from URLs in this list, or if the file is signed by a verified publisher. For all other unverified potentially dangerous file downloads, Chrome sends Google the information needed to help determine whether the download is harmful, including some or all of the following: information about the full URL of the site or file download, all related referrers and redirects, code signing certificates, file hashes, and file header information. Chrome may then show a warning like the one pictured above.

If you are enrolled in Google's Advanced Protection Program, Chrome will show you additional warnings when you download files but where Safe Browsing is unable to ascertain they are safe.

Chrome helps protect you against password phishing by checking with Google when you enter your password on an uncommon page. Chrome keeps a local list of popular websites that Safe Browsing found to be safe. If Chrome detects that you have entered your Google account password or one of your passwords stored in Chrome’s password manager on a website that’s not on the list, it sends a request to Safe Browsing to gather the reputation of that website. The verdict received from Safe Browsing is usually cached on your device for 1 week. For users who have enabled the "Help improve security on the web for everyone" setting, Chrome will ignore the list of popular websites for a small fraction of visits, to test the accuracy of that list.

If the reused password is your Google account password and the verdict for the website is that it is phishing, Chrome will suggest that you change your Google account password to avoid losing access to your account.

If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, or if you accept the “Protect account” option from the dialog shown below, Chrome sends a request to Google to protect your account. This request contains the URL where the phishing attempt happened, and the verdict received from Safe Browsing.

Chrome browser showing password alert

If you've opted into “Help improve security on the web for everyone”, Chrome also sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you start to enter a password on a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list. In addition, the request Chrome sends to Safe Browsing to determine the reputation of the website on which you reuse your password includes the list of websites for which you saved this password in Chrome’s password manager (but not the password itself).

If Chrome detects that your settings have been tampered with, Chrome reports the URL of the last downloaded potentially dangerous file, and information about the nature of the possible tampering, to the Safe Browsing service.

Chrome asks your permission before using certain web features (APIs) that might have associated risks. Some sites trigger these permission requests or use the corresponding APIs in ways that are abusive or that users find undesirable or annoying. On these sites Chrome may send the partial URL fingerprint to Google to verify if a less intrusive UI should be used to surface the request.

Chrome browser showing safe browsing settings

If you’ve opted into “Enhanced protection” (pictured above), in addition to all the protections described above for “Standard protection” mode, Chrome will use the real-time checks mechanism described above for checking the Safe Browsing reputation of top-level URLs and iframe URLs. If you're signed in to Chrome, the requests for performing real-time checks and the requests for checking potentially dangerous file downloads contain a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account that is used to protect you across Google apps. Enhanced protection also enables reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and overall web security, and it enables Chrome’s password breach detection. When browsing in incognito or guest mode, these extra checks do not occur, and Enhanced protection mode operates the same way as Standard protection.

For all Safe Browsing requests and reports, Google logs the transferred data in its raw form and retains this data for up to 30 days. Google collects standard log information for Safe Browsing requests, including an IP address and one or more cookies. After at most 30 days, Safe Browsing deletes the raw logs, storing only calculated data in an anonymized form that does not include your IP addresses or cookies. Additionally, Safe Browsing requests won’t be associated with your Google Account, except if the request includes the temporary authentication token described above. They are, however, tied to the other Safe Browsing requests made from the same device.

For Chrome on iOS 13 and later, Apple allows for connecting to multiple Safe Browsing services. This means that Chrome may connect to a third-party Safe Browsing service instead of the Google one. Apple determines which Safe Browsing service to connect to based on factors like your device locale.

Safety Check

Google Chrome includes a Safety check feature in settings. Running the Safety check verifies whether the browser is up to date, whether Safe Browsing is enabled, whether your passwords have been exposed as a part of a data breach, on Desktop whether you have potentially harmful extensions installed, and on Windows whether unwanted software has been found on your device.

Safety Check feature in Chrome browser

Unwanted software protection

The Windows version of Chrome is able to detect and remove certain types of software that violate Google's Unwanted Software Policy. If left in your system, this software may perform unwanted actions, such as changing your Chrome settings without your approval. Chrome periodically scans your device to detect potentially unwanted software. In addition, if you have opted in to automatically report details of possible security incidents to Google, Chrome will report information about unwanted software, including relevant file metadata and system settings linked to the unwanted software found on your computer.

If you perform an unwanted software check on your computer from the Settings page, Chrome reports information about unwanted software and your system. System information includes metadata about programs installed or running on your system that could be associated with harmful software, such as: services and processes, scheduled tasks, system registry values commonly used by malicious software, command-line arguments of Chrome shortcuts, Windows proxy settings, and software modules loaded into Chrome or the network stack. You can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the scan.

If unwanted software is detected, Chrome will offer you an option to clean it up by using the Chrome Cleanup Tool. This will quarantine detected malicious files, delete harmful extensions and registry keys, and reset your settings. The Chrome Cleanup Tool also reports information about unwanted software and your system to Google, and again you can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the cleanup.

This data is used for the purpose of improving Google’s ability to detect unwanted software and offer better protection to Chrome users. It is used in accordance with Google’s Privacy Policy and is stored for up to 14 days, after which only aggregated statistics are retained.

Offline Indicator

On Android versions Lollipop and older, when Chrome detects a network change, it sends a cookieless request to http://connectivitycheck.gstatic.com/generate_204 or http://clients4.google.com/generate_204 to determine whether you’re offline and display an offline indicator.

Software updates

Desktop versions of Chrome and the Google Chrome Apps Launcher use Google Update to keep you up to date with the latest and most secure versions of software. In order to provide greater transparency and to make the technology available to other applications, the Google Update technology is open source.

Google Update requests include information necessary for the update process, such as the version of Chrome, its release channel, basic hardware information, and update errors that have been encountered. The update requests also send Google information that helps us understand how many people are using Google Chrome and the Chrome Apps Launcher ⎼ specifically, whether the software was used in the last day, the number of days since the last time it was used, the total number of days it has been installed, and the number of active profiles. Google Update also periodically sends a non-unique four-letter tag that contains information about how you obtained Google Chrome. This tag is not personally identifiable, does not encode any information about when you obtained Google Chrome, and is the same as everyone who obtained Google Chrome the same way.

Because Chrome OS updates the entire OS stack, Google Update on Chrome OS also sends the current Chrome OS version and hardware model information to Google in order to ensure that the correct software updates and hardware manufacturer customizations such as apps, wallpaper, and help articles are delivered. This information is not personally identifiable, and is common to all users of Chrome OS on the same revision of device.

Unlike the desktop versions of Chrome, the delivery and management of updates for mobile versions of Chrome are managed through the app stores for Android and iOS. Mobile versions of Chrome utilize the servers described above for counting active installations and for user-initiated checks for updates.

Chrome extensions and applications that you’ve installed are kept up to date with a similar system used for updating desktop versions of Chrome. These update requests include similar information (such as the application ID, when the application was last used, and how long it’s been installed). We use these requests to determine the aggregate popularity and usage of applications and extensions. If you are using an extension or application restricted to a certain audience, authentication tokens are sent with the update requests for these add-ons. For security reasons, Chrome also occasionally sends a cookieless request to the Chrome Web Store, in order to verify that installed extensions and applications that claim to be from the store are genuine.

In order to keep updates as small as possible, Google Chrome is internally split into a variety of components, each of which can be updated independently. Each component is uniquely identified via an ID that is shared among all Google Chrome installations (e.g., “fmeadaodfnidclnjhlkdgjkolmhmfofk”). An update request for a component contains this ID, the hash of the previous download (called a "fingerprint"), and the component’s version. Because every installation has the same ID, and downloads of the same component have the same fingerprint, none of this information is personally identifiable.

If you install web apps on an Android device, a Google server is responsible for creating a native Android package that can be verified for authenticity by Chrome. When Chrome is updated or notices that the web app's manifest has changed, Chrome asks the server for a new version of the Android package in a cookieless request. If the information needed to create the native Android package cannot be acquired by the server (e.g., because the information is behind a corporate firewall), Chrome sends it to Google and an Android package is created that is unique to you. It contains a unique and random identifier that is not tied to your identity.

Chrome may also download and run a binary executable (e.g., as part of the software update or to improve Safe Browsing protection). These executables are cryptographically signed and verified before execution. Chrome may download further static resources like dictionaries on demand to reduce the size of the installer.

On Windows and OS X versions of Chrome, the recovery component tries to repair Google Update when it’s broken. After the relevant binary is executed, Google Update uploads statistics on the actions that were performed. These statistics contain no personally identifiable information.

Network time

On desktop platforms, Chrome uses network time to verify SSL certificates, which are valid only for a specified time. At random intervals or when Chrome encounters an expired SSL certificate, Chrome may send requests to Google to obtain the time from a trusted source. These requests are more frequent if Chrome believes the system clock is inaccurate. These requests contain no cookies and are not logged on the server.

Counting installations

In order to measure the success rate of Google Chrome downloads and installations of the Windows version of Google Chrome, a randomly-generated token is included with Google Chrome's installer. This token is sent to Google during the installation process to confirm the success of that particular installation. A new token is generated for every install. It is not associated with any personal information, and is deleted once Google Chrome runs and checks for updates the first time.

For Chrome to know how many active installations it has, the mobile version of Chrome sends a ping to Google with a salted hash of a device identifier on an ongoing basis. The desktop version of Chrome does not send any stable identifier to count active installations. Instead an anonymous message to Google with a timestamp of the last ping is used to infer number of active installations.

Measuring effectiveness of a promotion

Chrome utilizes two measurements to understand how effective a promotional campaign has been: how many Chrome installations are acquired through a promotional campaign, and how much Chrome usage and traffic to Google is driven by a campaign.

To measure installations or reactivations of Chrome through a campaign, Chrome will send a token or an identifier unique to your device to Google at the first launch of Chrome, as well as the first search using Google. On desktop versions of Chrome, a token unique to your device is generated. The same token will be sent if Chrome is later reinstalled at first launch and at first use of the Omnibox after reinstallation or reactivation. Rather than storing the token on the computer, it is generated when necessary by using built-in system information that is scrambled in an irreversible manner. On iOS, Chrome uses the IDFA for counting installations acquired by a campaign, and it can be reset in iOS settings.

To measure searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular campaign, Chrome inserts a promotional tag, not unique to you or your device, in the searches you perform on Google. This non-unique tag contains information about how Chrome was obtained, the week when Chrome was installed, and the week when the first search was performed. For desktop versions of Chrome, Chrome generates a promotional tag, if the promotional installation token described in the previous paragraph indicates that Chrome has been installed or reactivated by a campaign on a device which has not been associated with any campaign yet. For Chrome on Mobile, a promotional tag is always sent regardless of the source of installations.

The promotional tag is generated using a software library called "RLZ" and looks similar to “1T4ADBR_enUS236US239”. The RLZ library was fully open-sourced in June 2010. For more information, please see the In the Open, for RLZ post on the Chromium blog and the article “How To Read An RLZ String”. On Android, this promotional tag can also be a readable string like "android-hms-tmobile-us" instead of an RLZ string, and is not unique to either you or your device.

This non-unique promotional tag is included when performing searches via Google (the tag appears as a parameter beginning with "rlz=" when triggered from the Omnibox, or as an “x-rlz-string” HTTP header). We use this information to measure the searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular promotion.

Tokens

If usage statistics and crash reports are enabled, the RLZ string is sent along with the report. This allows us to improve Chrome based on variations that are limited to specific geographic regions.

For the desktop version of Chrome, you can opt-out of sending this data to Google by uninstalling Chrome, and installing a version downloaded directly from www.google.com/chrome. To opt-out of sending the RLZ string in Chrome OS, press Ctrl + Alt + T to open the crosh shell, type rlz disable followed by the enter key, and then reboot your device.

Usage statistics and crash reports

Chrome has a feature to automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google in order to help improve Chrome’s feature set and stability.

Crash reports

Usage statistics contain information such as system information, preferences, user interface feature usage, responsiveness, performance, and memory usage. Crash reports contain system information gathered at the time of the crash, and may contain web page URLs, actions taken by the user before the crash, and/or personal information depending on what was happening at the time of the crash. This feature is enabled by default for Chrome installations of version 54 or later. You can control the feature in the "Sync and Google services" section of Chrome's settings.

When this feature is enabled, Google Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on your device, which is sent to Google along with your usage statistics and crash reports. The token does not contain any personal information and is used to de-duplicate reports and maintain accuracy in statistics. This token is deleted when the feature is disabled and a new token is regenerated when the feature is enabled again.

By default, the usage statistics do not include any personal information. However, if you're signed in to Chrome and have enabled Chrome sync, Chrome may combine your declared age and gender from your Google account with our statistics to help us build products better suited for your demographics. This demographic data is not included in crash reports.

Along with usage statistics and crash reports, Chrome also reports anonymous, randomized data that is constructed in a manner which is not linked to the unique token, and which ensures that no information can be inferred about any particular user's activity. This data collection mechanism is summarized on the Google research blog, and full technical details have been published in a technical report and presented at the 2014 ACM Computer and Communications Security conference.

Chrome will also anonymously report to Google if requests to websites operated by Google fail or succeed in order to detect and fix problems quickly.

If you have also turned on “Make searches and browsing better (Sends URLs of pages you visit to Google)” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings, Chrome usage statistics include information about the web pages you visit and your usage of them. The information will also include the URLs and statistics related to downloaded files. If you sync extensions, these statistics will also include information about the extensions that have been installed from Chrome Web Store. The URLs and statistics are sent along with a unique device identifier that can be reset by turning off “Make searches and browsing better” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings or by turning off usage statistics and crash reports. The usage statistics are not tied to your Google account. Google only stores usage statistics associated with published extensions, and URLs that are known by Google’s web crawlers. We use this information to improve our products and services, for example, by identifying web pages which load slowly; this gives us insight into how to best improve overall Chrome performance. We also make some statistics available externally, through efforts like the Chrome User Experience Report. Externally published reports are conducted in highly aggregated manner to not reveal individual user's identity.

On iOS, if you are syncing your browsing history without a sync passphrase, Chrome reports usage for certain URLs that other Google apps could open. For example, when you tap on an email address, Chrome presents a dialog that allows you to choose between opening with Google Gmail or other mail apps installed on your device. The usage information also includes which apps were presented to you, which one was selected, and if a Google app was installed. Chrome does not log the actual URL tapped. If you are signed in, this usage is tied to your Google account. If you are signed out, the information is sent to Google with a unique device identifier that can be regenerated by resetting the Google Usage ID found in Chrome settings. The raw reports are deleted within 60 days, after which only the aggregated statistics remain.

Google Surveys in Chrome

In Chrome on Android and Desktop, when you have "send usage statistics" enabled, you may be randomly selected to participate in surveys to evaluate consumer satisfaction with Chrome features. If you are selected, Chrome requests a survey from Google for you. If a survey is available, Chrome then asks you to answer the survey and submit responses to Google.

The survey also records basic metrics about your actions, such as time spent looking at the survey and elements that the user clicked. These metrics are sent to Google even if you do not fully complete the survey.

Google uses strategies to ensure that surveys are spread evenly across users and not repeatedly served to a single user. On Android, Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on the device. On Desktop, Chrome uses a cookie to connect with the server. This token or cookie is used solely for the survey requests and does not contain any personal information. If you disable sending usage statistics, the token or cookie will be cleared.

Chrome browser showing a survey

Suggestions for spelling errors

Desktop versions of Chrome can provide smarter spell-checking by sending text you type into the browser to Google's servers, allowing you to apply the same spell-checking technology that’s used by Google products like Docs. If this feature is enabled, Chrome sends the entire contents of text fields as you type in them to Google, along with the browser’s default language. Google returns a list of suggested spellings that are displayed in the context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Requests are logged temporarily and anonymously for debugging and quality improvement purposes.

This feature is disabled by default; to turn it on, click “Ask Google for suggestions” in the context menu that appears when you right-click on a misspelled word. You can also turn this feature on or off with the “Enhanced spell check” checkbox in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome settings. When the feature is turned off, spelling suggestions are generated locally without sending data to Google's servers.

Mobile versions of Chrome rely on the operating system to provide spell-checking.

Translate

Google Chrome’s built-in translation feature helps you read more of the Web, regardless of the language of the web page. The feature is enabled by default.

Translate

Translation can be disabled at any time in Chrome’s settings.

Language detection is done entirely using a client-side library, and does not involve any Google servers. For translation, the contents of a web page are only sent to Google if you decide to have it translated. You can do that on an individual basis on each page that shows a translation option or for all pages in a specific language by choosing “Always translate” in the Translate UI. Additionally, you can do so by clicking on a translated search result on the Google Search Results Page.

If you do choose to translate a web page, the text of that page is sent to Google Translate for translation. Your cookies are not sent along with that request and the request is sent over SSL. This communication with Google's translation service is covered by the Google privacy policy.

If you’ve chosen to sync your Chrome history, statistics about the languages of pages you visit and about your interactions with the translation feature will be sent to Google to improve Chrome’s understanding of the languages you speak and when Chrome should offer to translate text for you.

Image Descriptions for screen reader users

Chrome can provide automatic descriptions for users who are visually impaired by sending the contents of images on pages you visit to Google's servers. This feature is only enabled when Chrome detects that the user has a screen reader running and if the user explicitly enables it in the page context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Chrome fetches the list of supported languages from Google's servers and then requests descriptions in the most appropriate language given the current web page and the user's language preferences. Requests are not logged.

Sign In to Chrome and sync

You have the option to use the Chrome browser while signed in to your Google Account, with or without sync enabled.

On desktop versions of Chrome, signing into or out of any Google web service, like google.com, signs you into or out of Chrome. On Chrome on Android, when you sign into any Google web service, Chrome may offer you to sign in with the accounts that are already signed in on the device. Signing into Chrome via this dialog doesn’t turn on sync. If you want to just sign in to the Google web service and not to Chrome, you can dismiss the dialog and enter your credentials manually in the web form in the background. If you are signed in to Chrome, Chrome may offer to save your passwords, payment cards and related billing information to your Google Account. Chrome may also offer you the option of filling passwords or payment cards from your Google Account into web forms. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether you want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in.

When you’re signed-in and have enabled sync with your Google Account, your personal browsing data information is saved in your Google Account so you may access it when you sign in and sync to Chrome on other computers and devices. Synced data can include bookmarks, saved passwords, open tabs, browsing history, extensions, addresses, phone numbers, payment methods, and more. In advanced sync settings, you can choose which types of data to synchronize with this device. By default, all syncable data types are enabled. You can turn sync on or off in the “You and Google” section of Chrome settings.

If you have turned on sync and signed out of the account you are syncing to, sync will pause sending all syncable data to Google until you sign back in with the same account. Some sync data types (such as bookmarks and passwords) that are saved locally while sync is paused will automatically be synced to your account after you sign back in with the same account.

On mobile versions of Chrome, you can turn sync on or off in Chrome settings. This can be done for any account that has already been added to the mobile device without authenticating again.

On both desktop and mobile, signing into Chrome keeps you signed into Google web services until you sign out of Chrome. On mobile, signing into Chrome will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that have been added to the device. On desktop, it will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that you added from a Google web service, unless you have set “Clear cookies and site data when you quit Chrome” in your cookie settings.

On Android and desktop, Chrome signals to Google web services that you are signed into Chrome by attaching an X-Chrome-Connected header to any HTTPS requests to Google-owned domains. On iOS, the CHROME_CONNECTED cookie is used instead. On Android, Chrome sends the X-Chrome-Connected header to accounts.google.com to indicate it is eligible for account consistency (meaning that you can sign in to Chrome and Google web services with the Google Accounts already present on your device). This allows those Google web services to update their UI accordingly. On desktop, Chrome sends the X-Chrome-ID-Consistency-Request header with all HTTPS requests to account.google.com if the “Allow Chrome sign-in” setting is enabled. If you are using a managed device, your system admin may disable the sign in feature or require that data be deleted when you disconnect your account.

Users can share phone numbers and text between their devices (mobile or desktop) when they are signed-in to Chrome. The transferred data is encrypted during transit and Google cannot read or store the content. To let users select the device to share with, Chrome collects the following information about devices on which a user is signed-in and stores that in the user's Google account: device manufacturer, model number, Chrome version, OS, and device type.

Google uses your personal synchronized data to provide you a consistent browsing experience across your devices, and to customize features in Chrome. You can manage your synchronized history by going to chrome://history in your Chrome browser. If “Include history from Chrome and other apps in your Web & App Activity” is checked on the Web & App Activity controls page, Google also uses your synchronized browsing data to provide personalized Google products and services to you. You can change your preference any time, and manage individual activities associated with your Google account.

The paragraph above describes the use of your personal browsing history. Google also uses aggregated and anonymized synchronized browsing data to improve other Google products and services. For example, we use this information to improve Google Search by helping to detect mobile friendly pages, pages which have stopped serving content, and downloads of malware.

For sync users, Google may collect additional information derived from Chrome history for the Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) experiment. FLoC is one of the open standards proposed as part of the Privacy Sandbox, an initiative to make the web more private and secure for users while also supporting publishers. Chrome’s implementation of FLoC assigns each user to an interest cohort - a cluster representing a large group of users who share similar browsing habits - and periodically updates this assignment by similarity-hashing recently visited URLs from navigation history. As a first step in the FLoC experiments, Google is logging users' cohorts via sync if you are syncing history without a custom passphrase, and if “Include Chrome history and activity from sites, apps, and devices that use Google services” in your Google Activity Controls as well as “Also use your activity & information from Google services to personalize ads on websites and apps that partner with Google to show ads” in your Google Ad Settings are enabled. Google will use logged interest cohorts to perform an internal privacy analysis before making them available to the web ecosystem for broader testing.

If you would like to use Google's cloud to store and sync your Chrome data without allowing any personalized and aggregated use by Google as described in the previous paragraphs, you can choose to encrypt all of your synced data with a sync passphrase. If you choose this option, it’s important to note that Google won’t have access to the sync passphrase you set; we won’t be able to help you recover data if you forget the passphrase. Regardless of how you choose to encrypt your data, all data is always sent over secure SSL connections to Google’s servers.

Google will store the metadata about the days on which sync was running to improve other Google products and services.

Chrome may help you sign in with credentials you've saved in Android apps on websites that are associated with the respective apps. Likewise, credentials you've saved for websites can be used to help you sign into related Android apps. You can view the credentials you've saved in Chrome and Android by visiting passwords.google.com in any browser. If you've saved credentials for Android applications, Chrome periodically sends a cookieless request to Google to get an updated list of websites that are associated with those applications. To stop websites and Android apps from automatically signing in using credentials you previously saved, you can turn off Auto Sign-In on passwords.google.com or in Chrome settings under "Autofill > Passwords". For more details see this article.

To make the history page easier to use, Chrome displays favicons of visited URLs. For Chrome browsing history from your other devices, these favicons are fetched from Google servers via cookieless requests that only contain the given URL and device display DPI. Favicons are not fetched for users with sync passphrase.

On the iOS version of Chrome, if you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase and your browser’s usage statistics and crash reports setting is also enabled, your usage statistics and crash reports will include statistics about the pages you visit. You can read more in the Usage statistics and crash reports section of this Whitepaper.

All data synchronized through Google’s servers is subject to Google’s Privacy Policy. To get an overview of the Chrome data stored for your Google Account, go to the Chrome section of Google Dashboard. That page also allows you to stop synchronization completely and delete all sync data from Google’s servers.

Autofill and Password Management

Google Chrome has a form autofill feature that helps you fill out forms on the web more quickly. Autofill is enabled by default, but it can be turned off at any time in Chrome’s settings.

If Autofill is enabled and you encounter a web page containing a form, Chrome sends some information about that form to Google. This information includes the basic structure of the form, a hash of the web page's hostname as well as form identifiers (such as field names); randomized representation of the form identifiers, and if you have turned on the "Make searches and browsing better (Sends URLs of pages you visit to Google)" setting, also a randomized representation of the web page's URL. In response, Chrome receives a prediction of each field’s data type (for example, “field X is a phone number, and field Y is a country”). This information helps Chrome match up your locally stored Autofill data with the fields of the form.

If Autofill is enabled when you submit a form, Chrome sends Google some information about the form along with the types of data you submitted. This information includes a hash of the web page’s hostname, as well as form identifiers (such as field names), the basic structure of the form, and the observed data types for the fields (i.e., field X was a phone number, field Y was a country). The values you entered into the form are not sent to Google. This information helps Chrome improve the quality of its form-filling over time.

You can manage your Autofill entries via Chrome’s settings, and you can edit or delete saved information at any time. Chrome will never store full credit card information (card number, cardholder name, and expiration date) without explicit confirmation. In order to prevent offering to save cards you have shown disinterest in saving, Chrome stores the last four digits of detected credit cards locally on the device. If you scan your credit card using a phone camera, the recognition is performed locally.

Chrome may help you sign in to websites with credentials you've saved to Chrome's password manager or your Google Account by autofilling sign-in forms, by offering you an account picker, or by automatically signing you in. You can manage and delete your saved credentials in the “Forms and passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. If you enable password management, the same kind of data about forms as described above is sent to Google to interpret password forms correctly. To enable Chrome to offer password generation that meets site-specific requirements, Chrome uploads a randomized vote on a specific password characteristic to the server once a user-created password is stored. If stored credentials are used for the first time in a username field which was already filled differently by the website itself, Chrome also transmits a short one-byte hash of the prefilled value. This allows Google to classify if the website uses a static placeholder in the username field which can be safely overwritten without deleting valuable user-specific data. Google cannot reconstruct the value from this hash.

When you’re signed in to Chrome with your Google Account on desktop, Chrome may offer you to use credentials you’ve saved to your account, to generate a strong password, or to save credentials to your Google Account. To access credentials in your Google Account, Chrome may ask you to re-authenticate to your Google Account. Credentials from your Google Account will be available on the device while you’re signed in, even when you are offline. If sync isn’t enabled, when you sign out of Chrome, all credentials stored in your Google Account are removed from Chrome on the device. While signed in to Chrome, you can choose to store a credential after you have signed into a site to your Google Account or locally to the device. Locally-saved credentials are not deleted when you sign out of Chrome. After you have used a locally-saved credential to sign into a site, Chrome may also offer you to move the locally stored credentials to your account.

When you sign in to a site, Chrome may give you a warning if the username/password have been exposed as a result of a data breach on some website or app. The feature is available on all platforms but only to the users signed in with a Google account. On Android the feature is only available if sync is also enabled, due to the way the accounts are managed by the OS. Being signed in to a Google account is a technical requirement that prevents abuse of the API. When you sign in to a website, Chrome will send a hashed copy of your username and password to Google encrypted with a secret key only known to Chrome. No one, including Google, is able to derive your username or password from this encrypted copy. From the response, Chrome can tell if the submitted username and password appear in the database of leaked credentials. The final resolution is done locally; Google doesn’t know whether or not the credential is present in the database. The feature can be disabled in settings under Sync and Google services. On desktop and Android versions of Chrome, this feature is not available if Safe Browsing is turned off.

Using the same secure method described above, you can check all the saved passwords against the public data breaches in the “Passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. Once you’ve run a password check, Chrome will show a list of breached passwords. If a password in this list is outdated, you can manually edit it to store the current version. If you choose to edit, the new username/password pair will be checked automatically but only if the feature described above is not disabled.

Also, if you choose, you can bring your Autofill data with you to all your Chrome-enabled devices by syncing it as part of your browser settings (see the “Sign In to Chrome” section of this document). If you choose to sync Autofill information, field values are sent as described in “Sign In to Chrome”; otherwise, field values are not sent.

If you enable Chrome’s credential provider extension in iOS Autofill passwords settings, Chrome will be able to autofill the passwords currently saved in Chrome into other apps on your device, such as Safari. The extension does not store Chrome passwords. If the device's keychain or the iCloud keychain are enabled as a credential provider, then the extension will prompt you to save the recently used password in the keychain.

Payments

When you’re signed into Chrome with your Google Account, Chrome may offer to save payment cards and related billing addresses into payment data under the same Google Account, and include cards from your account among the autofill suggestions on payment web forms. If you're not signed in, Chrome offers to save your credit cards locally. If the card is not stored locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication, such as Touch ID, Windows Hello, or Android screen lock, each time you use the card. In some versions of Chrome, it is possible to store a card to Google Payments and locally in Chrome at the same time, in which case Chrome will not ask for a CVV or device authentication confirmation. If you have cards stored in this way, their local copies will persist until you sign out of your Google account, at which point the local copy will be deleted from your device. If you choose not to store the card locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication each time you use the card. You can opt out of using device authentication in the Payment methods section of Chrome settings. If you use a card from Google Payments, Chrome will collect information about your computer and share it with Google Payments to prevent fraudulent use of your card. If you use device authentication to confirm cards from Google Payments, an identifier scoped to a device and signed-in session will be used to ensure that the device and account autofilling the card should have access to it.

To delete credit card information saved in Chrome, follow the “Add and edit credit cards” steps in the Autofill article. When you delete a credit card that's also saved in your Google Payments account, you will be redirected to Google Payments to complete the deletion. After your card has been deleted from your Google Payments account, Chrome will automatically remove that card from your Autofill suggestions.

To save a card locally on the device only, while still being signed in to Chrome with a Google Account, you can add a card from the “Add” button in the “Payment methods” section in Chrome settings. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether you want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in. If you have sync turned on, you can disable syncing payment methods and addresses to Google Pay under “Sync” in Chrome settings. You can also turn the Payments Autofill feature off altogether in settings.

Chrome also supports the PaymentRequest API by allowing you to pay for purchases with credit cards from Autofill, Google Payments, and other payment apps already installed on your device. Google Payments and other payment apps are only available on Android devices. PaymentRequest allows the merchant to request the following information: full name, shipping address, billing address, phone number, email, credit card number, credit card expiration, CVV, and Google Payments credentials. Information is not shared with the merchant until you agree.

Geolocation

Google Chrome supports the Geolocation API, which provides access to fine-grained user location information with your consent.

By default, Chrome will request your permission when a web page asks for your location information, and does not send any location information to the web page unless you explicitly consent.

Furthermore, whenever you are on a web page which is using your location information, Chrome will display a location icon on the right side of the omnibox. You can click on this icon in order to find out more information or manage location settings.

Maps

In Chrome’s settings, by clicking “Site Settings” and scrolling to the “Location” section, you can choose to allow all sites to receive your location information, have Chrome ask you every time (the default), or block all sites from receiving your location information. You can also configure exceptions for specific web sites.

In the Android version of Chrome, your default search engine automatically receives your location when you conduct a search. On the iOS version of Chrome, by default your location is sent to Google if you conduct a search from the omnibox. Read more about how your default search engine handles geolocation and how to manage your settings in the Omnibox section of the whitepaper.

If you do choose to share your location with a web site, Chrome will send local network information to Google (also used by other browsers such as Mozilla Firefox) in order to estimate your location. This local network information can include data about nearby Wi-Fi access points or cellular signal sites/towers (even if you’re not using them), and your computer’s IP address. The requests are logged, and aggregated and anonymized before being used to operate, support, and improve the overall quality of Google Chrome and Google Location Services.

For further reading on the privacy and user interface implications of the Geolocation API (as well as other HTML5 APIs), see ”Practical Privacy Concerns in a Real World Browser” written by two Google Chrome team members.

Speech to text

Chrome supports the Web Speech API, a mechanism for converting speech to text on a web page. It uses Google's servers to perform the conversion. Using the feature sends an audio recording to Google (audio data is not sent directly to the page itself), along with the domain of the website using the API, your default browser language and the language settings of the website. Cookies are not sent along with these requests.

Google Assistant on Chrome OS devices

The Google Assistant is integrated into some models of Chrome OS devices. If you opt in to the feature, Chrome OS listens for you to say "Ok Google" and sends the audio of the next thing you say, plus a few seconds before, to Google. Detection of the phrase "Ok Google" is performed locally on your computer, and the audio is only sent to Google after it detects "Ok Google". You can enable or disable this feature in Google Assistant Settings.

Enabling this feature in Chrome Settings will cause Chrome to listen whenever the screen is unlocked. On Chrome OS devices with a local audio processor, the device also listens when the device is asleep. On these devices, The Google Assistant feature only works if Voice & Audio Activity is enabled for your Google account. Chrome will prompt you to enable Voice & Audio Activity for the associated Google account if it is disabled.

Once the audio has been converted to text, a search with that text is submitted to Google. If you have used the “Ok Google” search before on a device but turned off Voice & Audio Activity later, your device is still capable of processing your voice and sending the audio to Google but the voice is deleted shortly thereafter.

You can determine your Chrome OS device’s behavior by examining the text in the "Search and Assistant" section of settings.

Google Assistant on Android devices

You can quickly complete tasks on the web using the Google Assistant in Chrome on certain Android devices . If you opt-in to this feature, you can speak to the Google Assistant and ask it to search websites. It also can fill out forms on your behalf, or speed up the checkout experience.

For example, if you issue a command to the Google Assistant e.g. “search Wikipedia for Henry VIII”, the Google Assistant in Chrome will respond by opening Chrome to Wikipedia, sending the query as a text string to Google Assistant in Chrome, and searching for “Henry VIII” on the Wikipedia page.

As another example, if you ask the Google Assistant to help you purchase tickets for an upcoming movie, then the address of the website you are viewing, your credit card information, and your email address will be shared with Google to complete the transaction and make it possible for you to receive the purchase receipt and movie ticket.

If you opt-in to this feature, the Google Assistant in Chrome will send data to Google in order to complete the command you issued. When the command is issued, the Google Assistant in Chrome shares back to Google the website’s URL to validate that the webpage is allowed to be automated by Google Assistant in Chrome and to receive the instructions on how to complete the task (e.g. on how to fill out a form).

At the time the command you issued is executed, additional information can be shared. Depending on the command you issued, the information shared with Google can include the address of the website you are viewing, your email address, your name, your delivery and billing address, your credit card information, and possibly the username you use to log into the website. This information is not stored by Google — rather, this information is passed on to the third party website to complete the command you issued to the Google Assistant. Additionally, information about your system is collected in order to improve the product and to debug issues.

To personalize future actions Google Assistant in Chrome will save configuration information about the command you issued to improve your future experiences (for example: seat selections, number and types of movie tickets, etc.). This information is saved to your Google Account.

Some Google Assistant features are not available on Incognito tabs. You can turn off the ability to use the Google Assistant in Chrome on your Android device by toggling the “Google Assistant for Chrome” option in Chrome’s settings.

Google Cloud Print

The Google Cloud Print feature allows you to print documents from your browser over the Internet. You do not need a direct connection between the machine that executes Chrome and your printer.

If you choose to print a web page via Cloud Print, Chrome will generate a PDF of this website and upload it over an encrypted network connection to Google’s servers. If you choose to print other kinds of documents, they may be uploaded as raw documents to Google’s servers.

A print job will be downloaded by either a Chrome browser (“Connector”) or a Cloud Print capable printer that you selected when printing the website. In some cases the print job must be submitted to a third-party service to print (HP’s ePrint, for example).

The print job is deleted from Google’s servers when any of three criteria is met:

  • You delete the print job
  • The job has been printed and marked as printed by the printer/connector
  • The job has been queued on Google’s servers for 30 days

You can manage your printers and print jobs on the Google Cloud Print website.

SSL certificate reporting

Chrome stores locally a list of expected SSL certificate information for a variety of high-value websites, in an effort to prevent man-in-the-middle attacks. For Google websites and other websites that choose to opt in, Chrome will report a possible attack or misconfiguration. If the certificate provided by the web server doesn’t match the expected signature, Chrome reports information about the SSL certificate chain to Google or to a report collection endpoint of the website's choosing. Chrome sends these reports only for certificate chains that use a public root of trust.

You can enable this feature by opting in to report data relevant to security, as described in the Safe Browsing section. While you are opted in, two kinds of reports may be sent to Google’s security team. Each time you see an SSL error page, a report will be sent containsing the SSL certificate chain, the server's hostname, the local time, and relevant details about the validation error and SSL error page type. Additionally, each time a mismatch between different certificate verifiers is detected, a report will be sent containing the certificate chain and the verification result.

Because Chrome sends these reports for all certificate chains, even those that chain to a private root of trust, these chains can contain personally identifiable information. You can opt out anytime by unchecking the box “Help Improve Chrome security” in “Privacy and security > Security”.

The SSL certificate reporting feature is not available on Chrome iOS.

Installed Applications and Extensions

Users can install external apps and extensions for the desktop versions of Chrome to add features to or customize their Chrome browsers. Installing an application or extension from the Chrome Web Store directly or via an inline installation flow on a third-party site involves a request to the Chrome Web Store for details about the application. This request includes cookies, and if you’re logged into Google when you install an application, that installation is recorded as part of your Google account. The store uses this information to recommend applications to you in the future, and in aggregate to evaluate application popularity and usage. As noted above, applications and extensions are updated via Google Update.

As they're more deeply integrated into Chrome, applications and extensions that you choose to install can request access to additional capabilities, enabling functionality that doesn't make sense on the web at large: background notifications or raw socket access, for instance. These additional permissions may change the way your data is collected and shared, as extensions and applications might have access to data regarding the websites you visit, and might be capable of monitoring or modifying your interactions with the web. When installing an application or extension, Chrome may first warn you about certain capabilities. Please do take the time to read and evaluate this warning before proceeding with the installation. Note also that interactions with and data collected by these third-party applications and extensions are governed by their own privacy policies, not Google's privacy policy.

Push messaging

Your device may receive push messages from the backend servers of apps and extensions installed in Chrome, websites that you grant the “notification” permission to, and your default search engine. Disabling push messages from your default search engine is done in the same way as disabling push messages from any site, by visiting the “Notifications” section of “Site settings”.

Push message data is sent over a secure channel from the developer through Google’s infrastructure to Chrome on your device, which can wake up apps, extensions, and websites (including your default search engine) to deliver the message. The developer may end-to-end encrypt the message data, or may send it in a form such that Google servers process it as plain text. Google servers retain up to 4 weeks’ worth of messages to ensure delivery to users even if their devices are offline at the time of the initial pushing.

If the notification permission is set to “granted” for any website (including the default search engine), or you have an app or extension installed that uses push messaging, then Chrome provides the app’s, extension’s, or website’s server with one or more registration tokens that can be used to send messages to the entity (app, extension, or website). Websites you visit in Incognito mode are not allowed to send you push messages and therefore cannot get a registration token.

When you uninstall an app or extension, revoke the notification permission for a website, or clear cookies for a permitted website, its registration token is revoked and will not be reused, even if the same app or extension is re-installed or the same website is re-visited. Registration tokens used by Chrome components such as Sync are revoked once they are no longer in use (for example, when the user disables Sync). When a registration token is revoked, the associated entity on your device stops receiving messages sent from its developer’s server.

The registration tokens that are passed to entities contain an encrypted device ID, which is used for routing the messages. Google can decrypt the device ID, but other entities cannot, and the encryption is designed so that two registration tokens for the same device ID cannot be correlated. On desktop versions of Chrome, the device ID is reset when the Chrome profile is removed, or when neither Chrome Sync nor any of the entities requires it for push messaging. On Android, the lifetime of the device ID is governed by the operating system and is independent of Chrome. Any messages routed to registration tokens containing a revoked device ID will not be delivered.

Chrome custom tabs

On Android devices, an app developer may use a Custom Tab to show web content when you click on a URL from their app. A Custom Tab may look different from a regular Chrome tab, for example it may have app-specified visual style, and the absence of an editable URL bar. Despite the different visual style a Custom Tab may have, the data sent and received in the Custom Tab, such as cookies, saved passwords and browsing history function the same way they do in a normal Chrome tab. The Custom Tab is an app-customized view using the same underlying user profile.

With Chrome Custom Tabs, an Android app developer may also specify custom actions in the Chrome toolbar and overflow menu that are relevant to their app, for example,"share", “save page”, “copy URL”. If you tap on such a button, the address of the current website is shared with the application.

An application can request Chrome to pre-render a given URL in the background. This allows Chrome to show you a pre-loaded site instantly when you open it from the app. At the same time it allows an application to set cookies in your browser in the background. To disable pre-rendering, you can uncheck "Preload pages for faster browsing and searching" in the “Privacy and security > Cookies” section of Chrome’s settings.

Trusted Web Activities are a form of Chrome Custom Tab where the top bar is not present, allowing web browsing with no browser UI but with access to the cookie jar. They can only be used to view web content on an origin that the client app can prove that it owns using Digital Asset Links. If the user navigates off this origin the the top bar reappears.

When the client app is uninstalled or has its data cleared through Android Settings, Chrome will allow the user to clear data for the linked origin.

Continue where you left off

If you have selected the option to “Continue where you left off” in settings on desktop versions of Chrome, when you open Chrome, it attempts to bring you right back to the way things were when the browser was closed. Chrome reloads the tabs you had open and persists session information to get you up and running as quickly as possible. This feature effectively extends a browsing session across restarts. In this mode, session cookies are no longer deleted when the browser closes; instead, they remain available on restart to keep you logged into your favorite sites.

On desktop versions of Chrome, this feature can be enabled or disabled in Chrome settings. On Chrome OS, it is enabled by default.

On OS X, when you restart your device, a checkbox in the OS confirmation dialog asks you whether you want to re-open applications and windows after restart. If you check this box, Chrome restores tabs and windows, as well as the session cookies, even if you have disabled "Continue where you left off" on Chrome.

On mobile versions of Chrome, this feature is always enabled without a setting.

Chrome Variations

Chrome is constantly evolving to better meet the needs of users and the web. To ensure new features are providing the best experience and working correctly, they may be enabled for a subset of users before they are fully launched. For example, if we improve how page loading works in Chrome, we may try it out for 1%% of users to ensure that it doesn't crash or run slower before launching to everyone. This is done through a system called "Chrome Variations" - also known as "field trials".

A given Chrome installation may be participating in a number of different variations (for different features) at the same time. These fall into two categories:

  1. Low entropy variations, which are randomized based on a number from 0 to 7999 (13 bits) that's randomly generated by each Chrome installation on the first run.
  2. High entropy variations, which are randomized using the usage statistics token for Chrome installations that have usage statistics reporting enabled.

Other factors may additionally inform the variations assigned to a Chrome installation, such as country (determined by your IP address), operating system, Chrome version and other parameters.

Usage statistics and crash reports are tagged with all variations a client participates in, including both low entropy and high entropy variations. These reports, which also contain a pseudonymous client identifier, can be disabled in Chrome settings.

Additionally, a subset of low entropy variations are included in network requests sent to Google. The combined state of these variations is non-identifying, since it is based on a 13-bit low entropy value (see above). These are transmitted using the "X-Client-Data" HTTP header, which contains a list of active variations. On Android, this header may include a limited set of external server-side experiments, which may affect the Chrome installation. This header is used to evaluate the effect on Google servers - for example, a networking change may affect YouTube video load speed or an Omnibox ranking update may result in more helpful Google Search results.

On Android Chrome, in certain cases these low entropy variations may also be sent to Google apps when cross-app communication occurs to support a Chrome feature; for example, when searching with Google Lens. This information is used to better understand how Chrome experiments affect that Google feature: for example, Chrome memory usage change could affect how long it takes an action in the Google app to complete.

You can reset the variations used by your Chrome installation by starting it with the “--reset-variation-state” command line flag.

Do Not Track

If you enable the “Do Not Track” preference in Chrome’s settings, Chrome will send a DNT:1 HTTP header with your outgoing HTTP, HTTPS and SPDY browsing traffic (Chrome cannot, however, guarantee that NPAPI plugins also send the header.) The header will not be sent with system traffic such as the geolocation, metrics or device management services.

The effect of Do Not Track depends on whether a website responds to the request, and how the request is interpreted. For example, some websites may respond to this request by showing you ads that aren't based on other websites you've visited. Many websites will still collect and use your browsing data - for example, to improve security; to provide content, services, ads and recommendations on their websites; and to generate reporting statistics.

Chrome on iOS now uses WKWebView to provide a more stable and faster browser. As a result of this move, the Do Not Track preference is no longer available due to iOS constraints. If Apple makes changes to allow this feature, Chrome will make Do Not Track available again in iOS.

Plugins

Chrome ships with an Adobe Flash Player implementation that is based on the Pepper API. Flash and other Pepper-based plugins may ask you for “Access to your computer”. If you grant this permission, the plugin is granted unsandboxed access. This allows content providers to offer you access to DRM protected content like videos or music but may have security and privacy implications, so consider carefully whether you trust a plugin or website with this privilege.

Media licenses

Some websites encrypt media to protect against unauthorized access and copying. When users play media from these sites, they typically log into the site, which authenticates the user, and then digital rights management negotiates a key exchange for the decryption and playback of the media.

For HTML5 sites, this key exchange is done using the Encrypted Media Extensions API. The implementation of that API is tightly coupled with the browser to protect user privacy and security, through Content Decryption Modules (CDM), which are provided by digital rights management solutions such as Google Widevine or Microsoft PlayReady.

When a user asks Chrome to play encrypted HTML5 media (for example, watching a movie on Google Play Movies), Chrome will generate a request for a license to decrypt that media. This license request contains an automatically generated request ID, which is created by the Content Decryption Module, as well as proof that the CDM is legitimate. After generation, the license request is typically sent to a license server managed by either the content website or Google. Neither the license request, the proof, nor the request ID include any personally identifying information. After being sent, the license request is not stored locally on the user’s device.

As part of the license request, Chrome also generates a unique session ID which does not contain personally identifying information. This session ID is sent to the license server, and when the server returns a license the session ID is used to decrypt the media. The session ID may be stored locally even after the site has been closed. The license may also be stored locally for offline consumption of protected content. Session ID and licenses may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

When returning a license, the site license server may include a client ID, generated by the site. This client ID is unique to the user and the site, it is not shared between sites. If provided, the client ID is stored locally and included by Chrome in subsequent license requests to that site. The client ID may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

On some platforms, the website may additionally request verification that the device is eligible to play specific types of protected content. On Chrome OS, this is known as Verified Access. In this case, Google creates a certificate using a unique hardware identifier for the device. This hardware ID identifies the device, but does not identify the user. If the user agrees, Google receives the hardware ID and generates a certificate verifying the device for the requested site. The certificate does not include the hardware ID or any other information that could permanently identify the device. Certificates are stored locally similar to other cached browsing data, and may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected. On Android, this is called Provisioning. See “MediaDrm Provisioning” for more details.

Some sites use Flash instead of HTML5. If a website you visit chooses to use Adobe Flash Access DRM protection, Chrome for Windows and Chrome OS will give Adobe Flash access to a device identifier. You can deny this access in the settings under Content Settings, Protected content, and reset the ID using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

In order to give you access to licensed music, the Google Play Music app can retrieve a device identifier that is derived from your hard drive partitions or, on a Chrome OS or Linux installation, from a unique file on your disk. This identifier can be reset by reinstalling your operating system.

MediaDrm provisioning

Chrome on Android uses Android MediaDrm to play protected content. As on ChromeOS, the website may request verification that the device is eligible to do so. This is achieved by MediaDrm provisioning. A provisioning request is sent to Google, which generates a certificate that will be stored on the device and sent to the site whenever you play protected content. The information in the provisioning request and in the certificate vary depending on the Android version. In all cases, the information can be used to identify the device, but never the user.

On Android K and L, the device only needs to be provisioned once and the certificate is shared by all applications running on the device. The request contains a hardware ID, and the certificate contains a stable device ID, both of which could be used to permanently identify the device.

On Android M or later, MediaDrm supports per-origin provisioning. Chrome randomly generates an origin ID for each website to be provisioned. Even though the request still contains a hardware ID, the certificate is different for each website, so that different websites cannot cross-reference the same device.

On Android O or later on some devices, provisioning can be scoped to a single application. The request will contain a hardware ID, but the certificate will be different for each application, in addition to each site, so different applications cannot cross-reference the same device.

Provisioning can be controlled by the “Protected media” permission in the “Site settings” menu. On Android versions K and L, Chrome will always ask you to grant this permission before provisioning starts. On later versions of Android, this permission is granted by default. You can clear the provisioned certificates anytime using the “Cookies and other site data” option in the Clear browsing data dialog.

Chrome also performs MediaDrm pre-provisioning to support playback of protected content in cases where the provisioning server is not accessible, such as in-flight entertainment. Chrome randomly generates a list of origin IDs and provision them in advance for future use.

On Android versions with per-device provisioning, where provisioning requires a permission, Chrome does not support pre-provisioning. Playback might still work because the device could have already been provisioned by other applications.

On Android versions with per-origin provisioning, Chrome pre-provisions itself once the user attempts to play protected content. As the provisioning for the first playback already involved sending a stable hardware ID to Google, the subsequent pre-provisioning of additional origin IDs introduces no new privacy implications. If provisioning fails and there is no pre-provisioned origin ID, Chrome may ask for permission to further fallback to per-device provisioning.

On devices with per-application provisioning, Chrome pre-provisions itself automatically on startup.

Cloud policy

When you sign into a Chrome OS device, Chrome on Android, or a desktop Chrome profile with an account associated with a Google Apps domain, or if your desktop browser is enrolled in Chrome Browser Cloud Management, Chrome checks whether the domain has configured enterprise policies. If so, the Chrome OS user session, Chrome profile, or enrolled Chrome Browser is assigned a unique ID, and registered as belonging to that Google Apps domain. Any configured policies are applied. To revoke the registration, remove the Chrome OS user, sign out of Chrome on Android, remove the desktop profile, or remove the enrollment token and device token for Chrome Browser Cloud Management.

Additionally, Chrome OS devices can be enrolled to a Google Apps domain by a domain admin. This will enforce enterprise policies for the entire device, such as providing shared network configurations and restricting access to developer mode. When a Chrome OS device is enrolled to a domain, then a unique device ID is registered to the device. In order to revoke the registration, the admin will need to wipe the entire Chrome OS device.

Registered profiles and devices check for policy changes periodically (every 3 hours by default). In some cases, the server pushes policy changes to the client without waiting for Chrome's periodic check. Unregistered profiles check whether a policy has been turned on for their domain each time Chrome starts up.

The policy list contains details about the types of configurations that are available via Cloud Policy.

Lite Mode

If you enable Lite Mode (previously known as “Data Saver”), Chrome may send your traffic through Google's optimizing servers to reduce the amount of data downloaded and speed up your page loads.

Chrome will share the URLs you visit with Google, as well as usage and performance statistics for those sites so Chrome can better optimize them. Cookies for sites you visit are not shared with Google. Logs are not associated with your Google Account, and all log entries are removed within 14 days. Pages loaded in Incognito will not use the optimizing servers and usage and performance statistics will not be reported.

Image Compression

To save Lite Mode users data, image requests may be sent to a Google image optimization server which will fetch the image from the origin and return a compressed version to Chrome. To avoid optimizing private images, Chrome first asks Google for a list of image URLs known to be on the page according to a crawl of the site from a Google data center. Only images on that list will be sent to the optimization server. Image URLs on the page that were not seen during the Google crawl will not be optimized, and no information about those URLs will be sent to Google.

Using Chrome with a kid’s Google Account

Chrome for Android offers features to be used when signed in with a kid's Google Account and automatically signs in a kid's account if they've signed into the Android device. Chrome uses the Sync feature to sync settings configured by parents to the kid’s account. You can read about how Sync data is used in the Sign in section of this Whitepaper.

The collection and use of Chrome data in association with a kid’s Google Account are governed by the Google Family Link - Children’s Privacy Policy.

In order for the configured settings to apply to a kid’s account, Chrome does not support the following features for a kid’s Google Account: signing out of Chrome, Incognito mode, and deleting browsing history from within Chrome. Browsing history can still be removed in the Chrome section of the Google Dashboard.

By default, first party cookie blocking is disabled when Chrome is signed in with a kid’s account. Parents can go to chrome.google.com/manage/family to allow their kids to block first party cookies. However, blocking cookies signs kids out of Google web products such as Google Search or YouTube and therefore prevents these products from providing any features designed for kids’ Google Accounts.

When Chrome is used with a kid’s Google Account, information about the kid’s requests to access blocked content is sent to Google and made visible to the kid’s parent(s) on chrome.google.com/manage/family and in the Google Family Link app. If the kid’s browsing mode is set to “Try to block mature sites”, Chrome will send a request to the Google SafeSearch service for each navigation in order to block access to sites that have been classified as containing mature content.

Incognito and Guest Mode

Incognito mode in Chrome is a temporary browsing mode. It ensures that you don’t leave browsing history and cookies on your computer. The browsing history and cookies are deleted only once you have closed the last incognito window. Incognito mode cannot make you invisible on the internet. Websites that you navigate to may record your visits. Going incognito doesn’t hide your browsing from your employer, your internet service provider, or the websites you visit.

Browsing as a Guest in Chrome allows you to use somebody else's computer without modifying their profile. For example, no bookmarks or passwords get stored on their computer. Note that Guest mode does not protect you for example, if the computer you are using is infected by a keylogger that records what you type.

iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite Handoff Support

While browsing in a standard (i.e. non-Incognito) session, Chrome will share your current URL with iOS 8+ to support the Handoff feature that was added in OS X Yosemite. This information is only sent to Apple devices that are paired with your iOS device, and the data is encrypted in transit.

More information is available at Apple Support, Apple Developers, and in the Apple iOS Security Guide. Chrome support for this feature can be disabled in Chrome settings.

Security Key

A FIDO U2F Security Key provides a non-phishable credential which can be used to authenticate a user. This mitigates the risk of various kinds of man-in-the-middle attacks in which websites try to steal your password and use it later.

To prevent abuse, a website is required to be delivered over a secure connection (HTTPS), and to register the security key before it can be used for identification. Once a website is registered with a specific security key, that security key will provide a persistent identifier, regardless of which computer it is plugged into, or whether you're in incognito or guest mode, but you must physically interact with the security key to give a website access to an identifier (by, for example, touching it, or plugging it in).

Physical Web

The Physical Web lets you see a list of URLs being broadcast by objects in the environment around you. Google Chrome looks for Physical Web devices with Bluetooth Low Energy beacons that are broadcasting URLs using the Eddystone protocol. Bluetooth signals can be received from 90 feet away or more, depending on signal strength and the user’s environment (although the range is often much shorter, due to obstacles and signal noise). If the Physical Web feature is enabled, Chrome sends detected URLs to Google’s Physical Web Service (PWS) via a cookieless HTTPS request. For each URL, the PWS obtains the title of the web page, filters out unsafe results, and returns a ranking based on non-personalized signals about the quality and relevance of the web page.

The Physical Web feature is available on Chrome on iOS and Android. Users will need to turn on Bluetooth to use the feature.

If Android users have location settings enabled on both their device and in Chrome, they will receive a notification the first time they are near a beacon that will give them the option to turn on the Physical Web feature. This beacon’s URL is not sent to Google’s PWS unless the Physical Web feature is enabled. Users can also enable (or disable) the feature in the Privacy settings. Once a user enables the feature, Chrome scans for nearby devices for a few seconds each time the user unlocks the mobile device in use and sends them to the PWS in order to obtain more information about the beacon. The user receives a silent notification when Chrome finds a nearby URL.

On iOS devices, users can enable (or disable) the feature in the Privacy settings or by adding the Chrome widget to their Today view in the notification center. Additionally, the feature is automatically enabled for users who have location enabled on their device, granted Chrome the location permission, and have granted Google the geolocation permission. Chrome scans for nearby devices whenever it is open in the foreground. When Chrome finds nearby URLs, users will see them as omnibox suggestions. Additionally, Chrome scans for nearby devices for a few seconds when the Today widget is displayed in the notification center.

Bluetooth

Google Chrome supports the Web Bluetooth API, which provides websites with access to nearby Bluetooth Low Energy devices with your consent.

Chrome does not let any page communicate with a device unless you explicitly consent. When a web page asks to pair with a device, Chrome will ask you to choose which device the web page should access, if any. Selecting a device for one page does not give other pages access to the device you have chosen, and does not allow that page to access other devices. Currently, permission for a page to communicate with a device is usually revoked when the page is reloaded, and is always revoked when Chrome is restarted.

Chrome data that Android sends to Google

The data collection and usage described in this section is handled by Android and governed by the Google Privacy Policy.

If the Android Backup Service is enabled on your device, some of your Chrome preferences will be saved and stored on Google servers. For Nexus and Android One devices, it is described under “Back up your data and settings with Android Backup Service” in this article. For other Android devices, you may be able to find help by looking up your device on this page. When setting up a new Android device, you may request that it copies the preferences from a previously set up device. If you do so, Android may restore backed up Chrome preferences when Chrome is first installed. The new device only copies the preferences if automatic restore is enabled (see “Restore your data and settings” in the same article), Chrome was signed into an account when the backup was made, and the new Android device is signed into that same account.

Chrome’s backup data for a particular device may also be restored if you uninstall and then later re-install Chrome on that device. This will only happen if automatic restore is enabled and the device is signed into the account that Chrome was signed into when the backup was made.

Integration with Digital Wellbeing

If you opt-in to see sites you have visited and set site timers in the Digital Wellbeing app on Android, Chrome will report which websites you’ve visited and the length of time spent in each of them to the app. Sites visited in incognito mode will not be reported to the Digital Wellbeing app.

To continually improve the experience of Digital Wellbeing, the app will share with Google the websites that you set a timer on and how long you have visited them.

You can opt out of this feature in the Digital Wellbeing app or in Chrome’s privacy settings anytime.

Источник: https://www.google.com/chrome/privacy/whitepaper.html

Password protected PDFs are common. You've probably received one from a bank or dealt with them at work.

Passwords are often used to protect sensitive information in a PDF document, or to prevent someone from easily editing it. That's great – it's good to know that whoever created the document is going the extra mile to protect your privacy.

The problem with a password protected PDF is that you need to enter the password every time you want to open the document. If you have multiple password protected PDFs, safely storing and managing all those different passwords can be a real hassle.

If you've ever wondered how to remove a password from a PDF to make it easier to open and share, read on.

Important note: To remove a password from a PDF, you must know what the password is beforehand. This guide is about convenience, and not for cracking or brute forcing an unknown PDF password.

Print to another PDF file

The most convenient way to remove password protection from a PDF is to open it, then print it as another PDF file. The new PDF file will not be password protected, and you'll be able to open it without having to enter the original password.

While this works in most free PDF readers, using a browser like Google Chrome is very easy, and works the same across all major operating systems.

First, open the password protected PDF in Chrome by opening a new tab and dragging the file into the browser. You could also right click on the PDF and select "Open with" and "Google Chrome", though this may differ slightly depending on your operating system.

You'll be prompted for the password. Enter the password, then click the "Submit" button:

Once the document is open, bring up Chrome's print menu by clicking the print button in the upper right-hand corner. Alternatively, just press Ctrl + p for Windows and Linux or Cmd + p for macOS:

With the print menu open, make sure "Destination" is set to "Save as PDF". Then click "Save" in the lower right-hand corner:

Rename the file if you wish and save it.

Then when you open the new file you won't be prompted for a password:

Finally, store your new PDF file somewhere safe. And be careful whom you share it with if it contains any sensitive information.

TL;DR

Here's a CliffsNotes version of the steps above:

  • Open the password protected PDF file in Google Chrome
  • Enter the password when prompted
  • Open the print menu, select "Save as PDF", and click the "Save" button
  • Rename the file if you want to and save it somewhere that's secure

And with that, you should be able to quickly and easily remove password protection from any PDF in Windows, macOS, and Linux.

Stay safe and happy password removing :)



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Источник: https://www.freecodecamp.org/news/pdf-password-remover-guide-how-to-remove-password-protection-from-a-pdf/

5 Ways to Remove Password from PDF Document For Free

Removing a password from a PDF document is easy when you have the right tools. As a matter of fact, you don't even have to know the original password in order to retrieve or reset it. This article shows you five different ways of removing the two different kinds of password protections in PDF. The first is the Open or User Password, which is used to access the document. The second is the Restrict Editing or Owner Password, which prevents editing, copying and printing of the document's contents. The article covers both scenarios - when you know the password and when you've forgotten it.

Method 1: Remove PDF Password from Adobe Acrobat Pro (Know Password)

Adobe Acrobat is the most popular tools for viewing and editing PDF files. As you might not be aware of, it can also help you remove password from PDF documents. However, you should know the password before proceeding to the steps. Unfortunately, you can only do this on a paid version of Adobe's PDF products. With Acrobat Reader, the free version, you'll only be able to see what type of protection has been applied, not remove a password. The following guide is based on the Standard Adobe Acrobate DC and Pro DC versions. If you don't have a valid copy of Acrobate, please check the other methods in this post. There is much cheaper PDF password unlocker tool out there..

 

Step 1: Since you know the password, first open the file in Adobe Standard DC or Pro DC. You can do this from the File > Open menu or simply double-click the file if Adobe is your default application for opening PDF.

 

Step 2: Click on File again, but this time go to the Properties option, which should open up the Properties dialog box. You'll see several tabs; click on Security.

 

Step 3: Change the Security Method option to No Security. This input is required to disable your current password. Since you're already signed into the document, no further authentication is required. Just hit the OK button to confirm the action. Your file is now accessible to everyone.

 

Remove PDF Password Adobe Acrobat

 

Of course, you can only follow this process if you know the password. Also, purchasing a monthly license for the Adobe PDF software is only justified if you're going to be using it regularly. If you're looking for a more affordable option, read on.

 

Cons of Adobe Acrobat:

  • Very expensive (USD 359).
  • Need to know the password in advance.

Method 2: Remove Password from PDF via pdfelement Editor

One of the most affordable and reliable PDF editors on the market is pdfelement. Available as Standard and Pro versions, pdfelement is an ideal cross-platform utility with versions for Mac and Windows. It offers all the features of the Acrobat suite, but it costs a lot less. Moreover, there's a free trial version you can use to check out the main features. One of the strongest features of this tool is how so much functionality has been packed into a relatively clean User Interface, or UI. Fortunately, you only need the trial version to remove a known password from a PDF document. Here's the process to be followed:

 

Step 1: Once you download and install pdfelement trial version, launch the program and click on Open File…

 

Step 2: The password box will pop up, since the file is protected. Enter the Open Password (User Password) and hit Enter.

 

Step 3: This might sound counterintuitive, but if there's a Restrict Editing password applied to the document, this needs to be removed first. You can click on Enable Editing and enter the password, then hit OK to confirm.

 

Step 4: After restrictions have been removed, go to the Protect tab by clicking on it. In the toolbar, find and click on the padlock icon, which is the option for password security settings.

 

Step 5 : On this page, uncheck the boxes for both security types to remove them, then click on OK to confirm password removal.

 

Remmove PDF Password PDFElement

 

Your Open and Restrict Editing passwords have now been removed, so you can freely share or edit the file, as required.

 

Until now, we've discussed methods to remove passwords from PDF when the password is known. What if you forgot the Open password or don't know the Restrict Editing password? How do you remove password protection in such a situation? That's what we're going to talk about next.

 

Cons of pdfelement:

  • Not free (USD 79) .
  • Only able to remove restriction if password is unkown.

Method 3: iSeePassword Dr.PDF Password Recovery

PDF Editor is a great tool to remove password from PDF. However, there are much cheaper ways to only remove a password from PDF. So the third-option we are talking in here is iSeePassword Dr.Excel, a purpose-built utility to: retrieve open password and remove Restrict Editing from a PDF document.

 

It's a super-convenient tool to have when you don't know what your open password is but you don't want to change it or blank it because there are other editors for that PDF document. It uses powerful password decryption methods to quickly recover your original password and get back to you. It now comes with hardware acceleration as a standard feature, which means you can deploy your GPU and your CPU cores to do the job of password recovery much faster than ever before.

 

 

Step 1:Install Excel Password Recovery Software and Add File

Download an original copy of Dr. PDF and install it on a PC or Mac. Launch the program and click on the type of password protection to be recovered/removed. For the Open password, it's the first option. Import the file into the program using Add File option.

 

PDF Password Recovery

Step 2:Choose Recovery Type

Once the PDF was loaded into the program, you need to select a password recovery type. Currently, there are 3 attack type, described as follows:

 

Brute Force: Takes longer than other methods but is ideal for more complex passwords.

Brute Force with Mask: Essentially the same as the above, but any attribute or character that you specify here will be removed from the combination possibilities.

Dictionary: Use custom or built-in dictionaries for commonly used passwords.

 

PDF Password Recovery Import

 

Step 3:Password Recovery Settings

You have to make a few settings if Dictionary or Mask Attack was choosen. For Dictionary Attack, you need to browse the local dictionary file and import to the program. For Mask Attack, the setting options are list in below.:

 

PDF Password Recovery Config

 

Step 4:Recover PDF Password

When selecting the attack type, you can also choose whether to use your processors to accelerate password recovery. Hit Start to begin the retrieval process. When the password is found, it will be displayed on your screen. Copy it and use it to open your document.

 

Excel Password Recovery Success

 

Note:For PDF Permissions Password

To remove the Restrict Editing password, select the second option in the Dr. PDF main screen. Add as many files as you like to the program. When done, just click on Start to instantly blank all the restrictions passwords and allow the document to be edited, copied, or printed.

 

PDF Password Recovery for Restriction

 

If you don't know the password to open or modify the file, this is the best tool you'll find. The recovery is clean, and restrictions removal is instant.

 

 

Method 4: Remove PDF Password with Google Chrome

There's also a way to do this in Google Chrome, but what it does is to save an unprotected copy of the document rather than remove or recover the password. It's a quick workaround in case you know the password but don't have access to a PDF editor in order to remove it. Here's how to remove PDF password using Google Chrome:

 

Step 1: Drag the PDF file and drop it into a new Chrome tab or window. Chrome has a built-in reader and editor for PDF that we will be leveraging for this purpose.

 

Step 2: Enter the Open password when prompted by Chrome. In the open file, go to File > Print, which will cause another window to open.

 

Step 3: In the new window, look for Destination Printer. There will be an option allowing you to “Save as PDF”, which you need to select. Confirm saving.

 

Save as PDF in Chrome

 

The new PDF file that you saved will not require a password to open. You can use any PDF editor for this, or open it again in a different Chrome tab or window.

Cons of Chrome:

  • Only applied to PDF file you know the password.

 

Method 5: Online PDF Password Remover

In a pinch, you can also try using an online service like unlock-pdf.com. Such services are widely available from a number of providers, and all of them use the highest standards of protection on their website so your uploaded document is secure. Most of the good ones will even remove your files from their servers after a specific period of time. Unlock-pdf.com is simple to use, as shown below:

 

Step 1: Open the URL in a browser window and click on the Choose File button to upload your locked PDF.

 

Step 2: Once uploaded, click on the blue Unlock File! Button. In a moment, you will be able to download an unlocked version of the document.

 

Unlock PDF Online

 

Unfortunately, this free method only works with removing the Owner password for restricted editing. You can't remove or recover an Open password using this method.

 

Cons of Online PDF Unlocker:

  • More time to break the password.
  • The content in PDF file might get leaked by remove server.

In general, online services are safe as long as their site is well-protected, but uploading your private documents over an unsecured Internet connection, like a public WiFi hotspot, is never a good idea. The best way is to use a PDF editor like Acrobat or pdfelement when you know the password, or quickly recover it with iSeePassword Dr. PDF if the password is lost or forgoten.

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data-privacy-security-hackers-hacking-unlock-iphone-0991

The key to your online security is to have strong passwords, but the challenge is to create distinct passwords that you can actually remember -- or else you may fall into the bad habit of using the same login credentials for multiple accounts. According to LogMeIn, the company behind the LastPass password manager, you could very easily have 85 passwords for all your accounts once you count all of your social media, streaming, bank accounts and apps.

If your data is compromised, weak passwords can have serious consequences, like identity theft. Companies reported a staggering 5,183 data breaches in 2019 that exposed personal information such as home addresses and login credentials that could easily be used to steal your identify or commit fraud. And that pales in comparison with the more than 555 million stolen passwords that hackers on the dark web have published since 2017.

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The identity protection of a post-password world isn't here for most of us. So in the meantime, try these best practices that can help minimize the risk of your data being exposed. Read on to learn how to create and manage the best passwords, how to be alerted if they're breached, and one crucial tip to make your logins even more secure. And here are three old password rules that wound up being dumb today.

Read more: The best password managers for 2020 and how to use them

Use a password manager to keep track of your passwords

Strong passwords are longer than eight characters, are hard to guess and contain a variety of characters, numbers and special symbols. The best ones can be difficult to remember, especially if you're using a distinct login for every site (which is recommended). This is where password managers come in.

A trusted password manager such as 1Password or LastPass can create and store strong, lengthy passwords for you. They work across your desktop and phone.

ht-broida-passwords

The tiny caveat is that you'll still have to memorize a single master password that unlocks all your other passwords. So make that one as strong as it can be (and see below for more specific tips on that).

Browsers like Google's Chrome and Mozilla's Firefox also come with password managers, but our sister site TechRepublic has concerns about how browsers secure the passwords they store and recommends using a dedicated app instead. 

Password managers with their single master passwords are, of course, obvious targets for hackers. And password managers aren't perfect. LastPass fixed a flaw last September that could have exposed a customer's credentials. To its credit, the company was transparent about the potential exploit and the steps it would take in the event of a hack.

Yes, you can write your login credentials down. Really

We know: This recommendation goes against everything we've been told about protecting ourselves online. But password managers aren't for everyone, and some leading security experts, like the Electronic Frontier Foundation, suggest that keeping your login information on a physical sheet of paper or in a notebook is a viable way to track your credentials. 

And we're talking about real, old-fashioned paper, not an electronic document like a Word file or a Google spreadsheet, because if someone gains access to your computer or online accounts, they can also gain access to that electronic password file.

cybersecurity-hacking-16

Of course, someone could also break into your house and walk off with the passkeys to your entire life, but that seems less likely. At work or at home, we recommend keeping this sheet of paper in a safe place -- like a locked desk drawer or cabinet -- and out of eyesight. Limit the number of people who know where your passwords are, especially to your financial sites.

If you travel often, physically carrying your passwords with you introduces greater risk if you misplace your notebook. 

Find out if your passwords have been stolen

You can't always stop your passwords from leaking out, either through a data breach or a malicious hack. But you can check at any time for hints that your accounts might be compromised.

Mozilla's Firefox Monitor and Google's Password Checkup can show you which of your email addresses and passwords have been compromised in a data breach so you can take action. Have I Been Pwned can also show you if your emails and passwords have been exposed. If you do discover you've been hacked, see our guide for how to protect yourself.

Now playing:Watch this: Are your login credentials on the dark web? Find out...

2:08

Avoid common words and character combinations in your password

The goal is to create a password that someone else won't know or be able to easily guess. Stay away from common words like "password," phrases like "mypassword" and predictable character sequences like "qwerty" or "thequickbrownfox." 

Also avoid using your name, nickname, the name of your pet, your birthday or anniversary, your street name or anything associated with you that someone could find out from social media, or from a heartfelt talk with a stranger on an airplane or at the bar. 

Longer passwords are better: 8 characters is a starting point

8 characters are a great place to start when creating a strong password, but longer logins are better. The Electronic Frontier Foundation and security expert Brian Kerbs, among manyothers, advise using a passphrase made up of three or four random words for added security. A longer passphrase composed of unconnected words can be difficult to remember, however, which is why you should consider using a password manager.

Don't recycle your passwords

It's worth repeating that reusing passwords across different accounts is a terrible idea. If someone uncovers your reused password for one account, they have the key to every other account you use that password for. 

The same goes for modifying a root password that changes with the addition of a prefix or suffix. For example, PasswordOne, PasswordTwo (these are both bad for multiple reasons).

By picking a unique password for each account, hackers that crack into one account can't use it to get access to all the rest. 

Avoid using passwords known to be stolen

Hackers can effortlessly use previously stolen or otherwise exposed passwords in automated login attempts called credential stuffing to break into an account. If you want to check if a password you're considering using has already been exposed in a hack, go to Have I Been Pwned and enter the password.

No need to periodically reset your password

For years, changing your passwords every 60 or 90 days was a long-accepted practice, because, the thinking went, that was how long it took to crack a password. 

But Microsoft now recommends that unless you suspect your passwords have been exposed, you don't need to periodically change them. The reason? Many of us, by being forced to change our passwords every few months, would fall into bad habits of creating easy-to-remember passwords or writing them on sticky notes and putting them on our monitors.

Use two-factor authentication (2FA) … but try to avoid text message codes

If thieves do steal your password, you can still keep them from gaining access to your account with two-factor authentication (also called two-step verification or 2FA), a security safeguard that requires you enter a second piece of information that only you have  (usually a one-time code) before the app or service logs you in.

google-authenticator

This way, even if a hacker does uncover your passwords, without your trusted device (like your phone) and the verification code that confirms it's really you, they won't be able to access your account.

While it's common and convenient to receive these codes in a text message to your mobile phone or in a call to your landline phone, it's simple enough for a hacker to steal your phone number through SIM swap fraud and then intercept your verification code. 

A much safer way to receive verification codes is for you to generate and fetch them yourself using an authentication app like Authy, Google Authenticator or Microsoft Authenticator. And once you're set up, you can choose to register your device or browser so you don't need to keep verifying it each time you sign in.

When it comes to password security, being proactive is your best protection. That includes knowing if your email and passwords are on the dark web. And if you discover your data has been exposed, we guide you through what to do if hackers have gained access to your banking and credit-card accounts.

Read more: Special report: A winning strategy for cybersecurity (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/9-rules-for-strong-passwords-how-to-create-and-remember-your-login-credentials/

Google Chrome Privacy Whitepaper

Last modified: February 4, 2021 (Current as of Chrome 87.0.4280.141)

This document describes the features in Chrome that communicate with Google, as well as with third-party services (for example, if you've changed your default search engine). This document also describes the controls available to you regarding how your data is used by Chrome. Here we’re focusing on the desktop version of Chrome; we touch only tangentially on Chrome OS and Chrome for Mobile. This document does not cover features that are still under development, such as features in the beta, dev and canary channel and active field trials, or Android apps on Chrome OS if Play Apps are enabled.

If you have a question about Google Chrome and Privacy that this document doesn’t answer, please feel free to ask it in the Google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U Forum. If you want to report a privacy issue, you winx hd video converter free file it in our public bug tracker. For issues that include confidential information, please use this link. We’d be happy to hear from you.

Omnibox

Google Chrome uses a combined web address and search bar (we call it the “omnibox”) at the top of the browser window.

As you use the omnibox, your default search engine can suggest addresses and search queries that may be of interest to you. These suggestions make navigation and searching faster and easier, and are turned on by default. They can be turned off by unchecking "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings.

Omnibox

When not in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome sends the text you've typed into the omnibox, along with a general categorization (e.g., "URL", "search query", or "unknown"), to your default search engine. Chrome will also send a signal to your default search engine when you focus in the omnibox, telling it to get ready to provide suggestions. That signal includes the URL of the currently displayed search engine results page. Your IP address and certain cookies are also sent to your default search engine with all requests, in order to return the results that are most relevant to you.

To provide suggestions and search results faster, Chrome may preconnect to your default search engine in the background. Chrome will not preconnect if you have either turned off “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Cookies” part of “Privacy and security” section or "Autocomplete searches and URLs" in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome's settings. When Chrome preconnects, it resolves the search engine’s IP address and connects it to the search engine, exposing your IP address.

When in Incognito mode, in order to provide these suggestions, Chrome relies on an on-device model that does not communicate with your default search google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U until you select a suggestion.

If Chrome determines that your typing may contain sensitive information, such as authentication credentials, local file names, or URL data that is normally encrypted, it will not send the typed text.

If Google is your default search engine, when you select one of the omnibox suggestions, Chrome sends your original search query, the suggestion you selected, and the position of the suggestion back to Google. This information helps improve the quality of the suggestion feature, and it's logged and anonymized in the same manner as Google web searches. Logs of these suggestion requests are retained for two weeks, after which 2%% of the log data is randomly selected, anonymized, and retained in order to improve the suggestion feature.

If you've chosen to sync your Chrome history, and if Google is your default search engine, the URL of the page you’re viewing is sent to Google in order to provide better, contextually relevant suggestions. URLs are sent only for HTTP pages and HTTPS pages, not other schemes such as file: and ftp:. Additionally, Chrome may present website and search query suggestions as soon as you place the cursor in the omnibox, before you start typing. Chrome is in the process of transitioning to a new service to provide these on-focus suggestions. For most users on desktop versions of Chrome, the request and complete set of suggestions are retained on Google servers in order to further improve and personalize the feature. When the URL that triggered the set of suggestions is deleted from your history, the set of suggestions will stop influencing suggestions personalized to you, and will be deleted; otherwise they are retained in your Google account for a year. For a small portion of users on desktop versions of Chrome, and users on mobile versions of Chrome, the logging described in the previous paragraphs apply except that URLs are never included in the 2%% sampling of log data.

On Android, your location will also be sent to Google via an X-Geo HTTP request header if Google is your default search engine, the Chrome app axure rp 8 license key free download - Crack Key For U the permission to use your geolocation, and you haven’t blocked geolocation for www.google.com (or country-specific origins such as www.google.de). Additionally, if your device has network location enabled (High Accuracy or Battery Saving Device Location mode in Android settings), the X-Geo header may also include visible network IDs (WiFi and Cell), used to geocode the request server-side. The X-Geo header will never be sent in Incognito mode. HTTPS will be required to include this header in the request. You can learn more about how to control the Android OS location sharing with apps on this article for Nexus, or find your device here if you do not use a Nexus. How to control location sharing with a site within Chrome is written in this article. See the Geolocation section of this whitepaper for more information on default geolocation permissions.

Additionally, if Google is your default search engine and you have enabled sync, omnibox may also show suggestions for your Google Drive files. You can turn this functionality off by disabling the “Drive suggestions” option in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings.

If you use a non-Google search provider as your default search engine, queries are sent and logged under that provider's privacy policy.

Additionally, when you use the omnibox to search for a single word, Chrome may send this word to your DNS server to see whether it corresponds to a host on your network, and may try to connect to the corresponding host. This gives you the option to navigate to that host instead of searching. For example, if your router goes by the hostname “router”, and you type “router” in the omnibox, you’re given the option to navigate to https://router/, as well as to search for the word “router” with your default search provider. This feature is not controlled by the "Use a prediction service to help complete searches and URLs." option because it does not involve sending data to your default search engine.

Network predictions

Chrome uses a service to predict which resources and pages are likely to be needed next in order to load pages more quickly. The prediction service uses navigation history, local heuristics, and data learned from Google’s search crawlers. Retrieving the data from Google's crawlers requires sending the URL of the current page to Google, and so it is only used if you’ve opted into "Make Searches and Browsing Better (Sends URLs of the pages you visit to Google)" and/or enabled Lite Mode. The prediction service may initiate actions such as DNS prefetching, TCP and TLS preconnection, and prefetching of web pages. To turn off network predictions, uncheck “Preload pages for faster browsing and searching” in the “Privacy and security > Cookies” section of Chrome’s settings on desktop, in the “Privacy” section of Chrome’s settings on Android, and in the “Bandwidth” section of Chrome’s settings on iOS.

To improve load times, the browser can be asked to prefetch links that you might click next. Chrome supports five types of prefetching:

  • Chrome prefetching - can be initiated by Chrome itself whenever it detects a search query typed in the omnibox, a likely beginning of a URL you type often in the omnibox, or when you have Lite mode enabled and are visiting Google Search.
  • Webpage prefetching - requested by one web page to prefetch another
  • AMP prefetching - can be requested only by the Google Search App on Android to prefetch several accelerated mobile pages (AMP) articles and display them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • CustomTabs prefetching - any Android app can request to prefetch microsoft office 2016 professional plus - Crack Key For U URLs to speed up displaying them later in a Chrome Custom Tab
  • Privacy-preserving search result link prefetching - can be initiated by Chrome on Google Search result pages to prefetch links to other websites.

Four mechanisms preserve user privacy for search result link prefetches:

  • Prefetching is restricted to domains for which Chrome doesn’t have a corresponding cookie.
  • Passive fingerprinting surfaces such as User-Agent are bucketed or set to fixed values.
  • Prefetches are limited to HTTPS links and tunneled through a CONNECT proxy operated by Google. Consequently, the TLS connection is established between Chrome and the origin so the proxy server cannot inspect jriver media center 24 license key - Activators Patch traffic, and requests to the origin come from a Google IP address instead of the user’s IP address. Google only learns about the destination domain and sub-resource domains that will be prefetched, which Google already knows because it generated the Search results page and crawled the page, respectively.
  • Prefetched resources and cookies set by the prefetched domain are only persisted when you click the search result and visit the prefetched domain.

Controlling the feature. All prefetching types except webpage prefetching are controlled by Chrome’s prediction service setting. Webpage prefetching is allowed regardless of whether Chrome’s network prediction service feature is enabled.

Handling of cookies. Except for the privacy-preserving search result link prefetching case, the prefetched site is allowed to set and read its own cookies even if you don’t end up visiting the prefetched page, and prefetching is disabled if you have chosen to block third-party cookies. In the privacy-preserving search result link prefetching case, prefetching is disabled if you have a cookie for the site, and the site can only set a cookie once you click on the link that was prefetched.

Javascript execution. For AMP prefetching the page is fully rendered and Javascript is also executed. For the remaining types of prefetching Javascript is not executed.

Google search locale

If Google is set as your default search engine, Chrome will try to determine the most appropriate locale for Google search queries conducted from the omnibox in order to give you relevant search results based on your location. For example, if you were in Germany, your omnibox searches may go through google.de instead of google.com.

In order to do this, Chrome will send a request to google.com each time you start the browser. If you already have any cookies from the google.com domain, this request will also include these cookies, and is logged as any normal HTTPS request to google.com would be (see the description of “server logs” in the privacy key terms for details). If you do not have any cookies from google.com, this request will not create any.

New Tab page

The Chrome New Tab page may display suggestions for websites that you might want to visit.

In order to help you get started, Chrome may suggest content that is popular in your country or region. Chrome uses your IP address to identify your country or region.

Chrome tries to make personalized suggestions that are useful to you. For this, Chrome uses the sites you have visited from your local browsing history. On Android, the most popular languages of the sites adobe photoshop 2020 crack reddit - Free Activators visited may also be sent to Google to provide suggestions in languages you prefer to read, and the device display DPI may be sent to format content for your device. To save data, Chrome may additionally send a hash of the content that Google provided to you the last time, so that you only download content when there is something new.

If you are signed into Chrome, suggestions are also based on data stored in your Google account activity. You can control the collection of data in your Google account at Activity controls and manage your account activity at My Activity. For example, if you sync your browsing history and have enabled its use in your Web & App activity, Google may suggest sites that relate to sites you have visited in the past. Chrome measures the quality of suggestions by sending Google information about the sets of suggestions that were displayed, and those that were selected.

On the desktop version of Chrome, you may also manually add shortcuts to websites that you regularly visit, or edit Chrome’s existing website suggestions. After you add, edit, or delete a shortcut to a website, the Chrome New Tab page will not suggest any new websites to you.

Suggestions generated from your browsing history will be removed once you clear your browsing history. However, if you customized your suggestions, they will not be removed.

For Chrome on Android, in certain countries, Chrome may download the content of the New Tab page suggestions from Google, for use while offline. Chrome sends to Google a cookieless request with the URL for each suggestion, along with Chrome’s user agent string, in order to render the content. You can remove downloaded content by clearing Chrome’s cache data, or by opening the Downloads menu and selecting individual pages to delete. You can disable this feature by disabling “Download articles for you on Wi-Fi” in Chrome’s Downloads settings.

On mobile versions of Chrome, if you’re signed in to Chrome and have the Web & App activity setting enabled for your account, your preferences for the suggested articles can be modified or removed using the “Manage Interests” option from the three dots menu. Your preferences will be sent to Google so that better suggestions are provided to you in the future. For example, if you indicate that you’re not interested in a particular topic or publisher, suggestions about that topic or publisher will not be shown in the future. Likewise, you can indicate that you’re not interested in a specific article via the “Hide story” option in the article’s three dots menu. Suggestions are also personalized based on your interactions with the suggested articles (for example, tapping on or ignoring an article). You can manage this interaction data, which is stored in the Discover section of your Google account, at My Activity. Google may use anonymized and aggregated interest and interaction data from you to improve the quality of suggested articles for other users. For instance, if you view or open a suggestion it might be suggested more often, while if you report its contents as inappropriate it might stop being suggested.

For desktop and Android versions of Chrome, when you open a new tab, Chrome loads a New Tab page customized by your default search engine (e.g., google.com) if it’s available. This page is preloaded in the background and refreshed periodically so that it opens quickly. Your IP address and cookies, as well as your current browser theme, are sent to your search engine with each refresh request so that the New Tab page can be correctly displayed. See the Embedded Search API for more details. Your search engine may also record your interactions with the New Tab page.

The New Tab page content may be designed by your default search provider. Suggested websites are embedded by Chrome into the New Tab page in a way that does not expose them to your default search provider.

If your default search provider is Google, the New Tab page also contains a web address and search bar that behaves like the omnibox.

This information about the New Tab page may not apply if you've installed an extension that overrides the New Tab page.

Touch to Search

If you've enabled "Touch to Search" on Chrome Mobile you can search for terms by selecting them.

When you select a word, the word, the surrounding text, the languages you speak (from Chrome's Languages settings), and the home country of your device's SIM card are sent to Google to identify recommended search terms (for example, selecting "whale" on a site about the blue whale would lead to the selection expanding to show "blue whale"). The selected word is logged in accordance with standard Google logging policies, and the surrounding text and home country are logged only when the page is already in Google's search index. If you have turned on “Make searches and browsing better”, the URL of the page is also sent and logged, and is used to improve your query suggestions.

When Google returns a search suggestion, a card appears that may present an action or additional information related to the search. Opening this card is considered a regular search and navigation on Google, so standard logging policies apply.

Adjusting a selection causes a search for the exact selection. For example, if the user selects "climate" and the selection is automatically expanded to "climate change", the user can adjust the selection back to just "climate" and opening the panel would show full search results for "climate" rather than "climate change". Saying “Ok Google” after selecting a word provides the word and its surrounding text as context for the Google Assistant.

Touch to Winx hd video converter deluxe 5.16.2 crack is enabled in a limited mode by default: potentially privacy-sensitive data, such as the URL and surrounding text, is not sent for HTTPS pages. Touch to Search can be fully enabled and disabled in the card or in the Chrome privacy settings.

Search with Google Lens

On Android Chrome, if Google is selected as the default search engine and a recent version of the Google app is installed on your device, touching & holding on an image will present you with an option to initiate a search with Google Lens.

A tap on that menu item will redirect you to the Lens experience in the Google App and the image bytes of the selected image will be sent to the Google Lens app. For non-incognito users, the name of the currently signed-in account (if applicable), image tag attributes, and Chrome experiments may also be sent to the Google App. This information is used to improve the user experience within the Lens app.

Triggering a Lens search is considered a regular search and navigation on Google, so standard logging policies apply.

Safe Browsing protection

Google Chrome includes an optional feature called "Safe Browsing" to help protect you against phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or extensions. You can find more information at safebrowsing.google.com about how Safe Browsing protects you in Chrome and other Google products. Safe Browsing is designed specifically to protect your privacy and is also used by other popular browsers.

You can find settings for Safe Browsing in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome’s settings. When Safe Browsing is enabled in the “Standard protection” mode (pictured below), Chrome contacts Google's servers periodically to download the most recent Safe Browsing list of unsafe sites including sites associated with phishing, social engineering, malware, unwanted software, malicious ads, intrusive ads, and abusive websites or Chrome extensions. The most recent copy of this list is stored locally on your system. Chrome checks the URL of each site you visit or file you download against this local list. If you navigate to a URL that appears on the list, Chrome sends a partial URL fingerprint (the first 32 bits of a SHA-256 hash of the URL) to Google for verification that the URL is indeed dangerous. Chrome also sends a partial URL fingerprint when a site requests a potentially dangerous permission, so that Google can protect you if the site is malicious. Google cannot determine the actual URL from this information.

In addition to the URL check described above, Chrome also conducts client-side checks. If a website looks key resharper 2020 - Free Activators, Chrome sends a subset of likely phishing and social engineering terms found on the page to Google, in order to determine whether the website should be considered malicious. These client-side checks also include comparisons of the visual appearance of the page to a list of images of login pages. If a website appears similar to a page on this list, Chrome will send the URL and the matched entry on the list to Google to determine whether the page is a likely phishing attempt. Chrome can also help protect you from phishing if you type one of your previously saved passwords into an uncommon site. In this case Chrome sends the URL and referrers of the page to Google to see if the page might be trying to steal your password.

If you encounter a website that is on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you may see a warning like the one shown below.

Malware

You can visit our malware warning test page or social engineering warning test page to see the above example in action. For more information about the warning pages, see Manage warnings about unsafe sites.

Additionally, if you've opted into “Make Searches and Browsing Better (sends URLs of the pages you visit to Google)”, Chrome sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you visit a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list of safe sites in order to gather the latest reputation of that website (we call this mechanism “real-time checks”). If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, this request also contains a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account to provide better protections to some users whose account may be under attack. If the website is deemed unsafe by Safe Browsing, you may see a warning like the one shown above. This mechanism is designed to catch unsafe sites that switch domains very quickly or hide from Google's crawlers. Pages loaded in Incognito are not checked using this mechanism.

You can also opt in to reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and security on the Internet. You can opt in by turning on the “Help improve security on the web for everyone” setting in the “Privacy and security > Security” section of Chrome's settings. You can also opt in from the warning page shown above. If you opt in, Chrome will send an incident report to Google every time you receive a warning, visit a suspicious page, and on a very small fraction of sites where Chrome thinks there could be threats, to help Safe Browsing learn about the new threats you may be encountering. Additionally, some downloaded files that are suspicious and show a warning may be sent to Google for investigation each time they are encountered. All reports are sent to Google over an encrypted channel and can include URLs, headers, and snippets of content from the page and they never include data from browsing you do in Incognito mode. If Chrome discovers unwanted or malicious software on your machine, the reports may also include details about malicious files and registry entries. This data is used only to improve Safe Browsing and to improve security on the Internet. For example, Chrome reports some SSL certificate chains to Google to help improve the accuracy of Chrome’s SSL warnings. As part of Certificate Transparency, Chrome also reports to Google a sampling of information about SSL certificates and any observed signed certificate timestamps (SCTs). These reports help Google verify that the third-party logs in the Certificate Transparency system are behaving honestly, which helps ensure that HTTPS connections can be trusted. Chrome does not send reports for connections authenticated with certificates that chain to locally installed roots.

Please be aware that if you disable the Safe Browsing feature, Chrome will no longer be able to protect you from websites that try to steal your information or install harmful software. We don't recommend turning it off.

If you are a webmaster, developer, or network admin, you can find more relevant information about Safe Browsing on this page.

Safe Browsing also protects you from abusive extensions and malicious software. When Chrome starts, and on each update of the Safe Browsing list, Chrome scans extensions installed in your browser against the Safe Browsing list. If an extension wise care 365 pro crack download - Crack Key For U the list is found, Chrome will disable the extension, offer you relevant information and may provide an option for you to remove the extension or re-enable it. Chrome also sends the particular extension ID to Safe Browsing.Extensions can also be disabled by Chrome if they're determined to be malicious during an update. If you attempt to download a file on Chrome’s Safe Browsing list, you'll see a warning like this one:

This file is malicious, and Chrome has blocked it.

To warn you about potentially dangerous files, like the picture shown above, Chrome checks the URL of potentially dangerous file types you download against a list of URLs that have been verified. Potentially dangerous file types include both executables and commonly-abused document types. This list is stored locally on your computer and updated regularly. Chrome does not send information to Google for files you download from URLs in this list, or if the file is signed by a verified publisher. For all other unverified potentially dangerous file downloads, Chrome sends Google the information needed to help determine whether the download is harmful, including some or all of the following: information about the full URL of the site or file download, all related referrers and redirects, code signing certificates, file hashes, and file header information. Chrome may then show a warning like the one pictured above.

If you are enrolled in Google's Advanced Protection Program, Chrome will show you additional warnings when you download files but where Safe Browsing is unable to ascertain they are safe.

Chrome helps protect you against password phishing by checking with Google when you enter your password on an uncommon page. Chrome keeps a local list of popular websites that Safe Browsing found to be safe. If Chrome detects that you have entered your Google account password or one of your passwords stored in Chrome’s password manager on a website that’s not on the google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U, it sends a request to Safe Browsing to gather the reputation of that website. The verdict received from Safe Browsing is usually cached on your device for 1 week. For users who have enabled the "Help improve security on the web for everyone" setting, Chrome will ignore the list of popular websites for a small fraction of visits, to test the accuracy of that list.

If the reused password is your Google account password and the verdict for the website is that it is phishing, Chrome will suggest that you change your Google account password to avoid losing access to your account.

If you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase, or if you accept the “Protect account” option from the dialog shown below, Chrome sends a request to Google to protect your account. This request contains the URL where the phishing attempt happened, and the verdict received from Safe Browsing.

Chrome browser showing password alert

If you've opted into “Help improve security on the web for everyone”, Chrome also sends a request to Safe Browsing each time you start to enter a password on a page that isn’t in Chrome’s local list. In addition, the request Chrome sends to Safe Browsing to determine the reputation of the website on which you reuse your password includes the list of websites for which you saved this password in Chrome’s password manager (but not the password itself).

If Chrome detects that your settings have been tampered with, Chrome reports the URL of the last downloaded potentially dangerous file, and information about the nature of the possible tampering, to the Safe Browsing service.

Chrome asks your permission before using certain web features (APIs) that might have associated risks. Some sites trigger these permission requests or use the corresponding APIs in ways that are abusive or that users find undesirable or annoying. On these sites Chrome may send the partial URL fingerprint to Google to verify if a less intrusive UI should be used to surface the request.

Chrome browser showing safe browsing settings

If you’ve opted into “Enhanced protection” (pictured above), in addition to all the protections described above for “Standard protection” mode, Chrome will use the real-time checks mechanism described above for checking the Safe Browsing reputation of top-level URLs and iframe URLs. If you're signed in to Chrome, the requests for performing real-time checks and the requests for checking potentially dangerous file downloads contain a temporary authentication token tied to your Google account that is used to protect you across Google apps. Enhanced protection also enables reporting additional data relevant to security to help improve Safe Browsing and overall web security, and it enables Chrome’s password breach detection. When browsing in incognito or guest mode, these extra checks do not occur, and Enhanced protection mode operates the same way as Standard protection.

For all Safe Browsing requests and reports, Google logs the transferred data in its raw form and retains this data for up to 30 days. Google collects standard log information for Safe Browsing requests, including an IP address and one or more cookies. After at most 30 days, Safe Browsing deletes the raw logs, storing only calculated data in an anonymized form that does not include your IP addresses or cookies. Additionally, Safe Browsing requests won’t be associated with your Google Account, except if the request includes the temporary authentication token described above. They are, however, tied to the other Safe Browsing requests made from the same device.

For Chrome on iOS 13 and later, Apple allows for connecting to multiple Safe Browsing services. This means that Chrome may connect to a third-party Safe Browsing service instead of the Google one. Apple determines which Safe Browsing service to connect to based on factors like your device locale.

Safety Check

Google Chrome includes a Safety check feature in settings. Running the Safety check verifies whether the browser is up to how to add foxit reader as a printer, whether Safe Browsing is enabled, whether your passwords have been exposed as a part of a data breach, on Desktop whether you have potentially harmful extensions installed, and on Windows whether unwanted software has been found on your device.

Safety Check feature in Chrome browser

Unwanted software protection

The Windows version of Chrome is able to detect and remove certain types of software that violate Google's Unwanted Software Policy. If left in your system, this software may perform unwanted actions, such as changing your Chrome settings without your approval. Chrome periodically scans your device to detect potentially unwanted software. In addition, if you have opted in to automatically report details of possible security incidents to Google, Chrome will report information about unwanted software, including relevant file metadata and system settings linked to the unwanted software found on your computer.

If you perform an unwanted software check on your computer from the Settings page, Chrome reports information about unwanted software and your system. System information includes metadata about programs installed or running on your system that could be associated with harmful software, such as: services and processes, scheduled tasks, system registry values commonly used by malicious software, command-line arguments of Chrome shortcuts, Windows proxy settings, and software modules loaded into Chrome or the network stack. You can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the scan.

If unwanted software is detected, Chrome will offer you an option to clean it up by using the Chrome Cleanup Tool. This will quarantine detected malicious files, delete harmful extensions and registry keys, and reset your settings. The Chrome Cleanup Tool also reports information about unwanted software and your system to Google, and again you can opt out of sharing this data by deselecting the checkbox next to "Report details to Google" before starting the cleanup.

This data is used for the purpose of improving Google’s ability to detect unwanted software and offer better protection to Chrome users. It is used in accordance with Google’s Privacy Policy and is stored for up to 14 days, after which only aggregated statistics are retained.

Offline Indicator

On Android versions Lollipop and older, when Chrome detects a network change, it sends a cookieless request to http://connectivitycheck.gstatic.com/generate_204 or http://clients4.google.com/generate_204 to determine whether you’re offline and display an offline indicator.

Software updates

Desktop versions of Chrome and the Google Chrome Apps Launcher use Google Update to keep you up to date with the latest and most secure versions of software. In order to provide greater transparency and to make the technology available to other applications, the Google Update technology is open source.

Google Update requests include information necessary for the update process, such as the version of Chrome, its release channel, basic hardware information, and update errors that have been encountered. The update requests also send Google information that helps us understand how many people are using Google Chrome and the Chrome Apps Launcher ⎼ specifically, whether the software was used in the last day, the number of days since the last time it was used, the total number of days it has been installed, and the number of active profiles. Google Update also periodically sends a non-unique four-letter tag that contains information about how you obtained Google Chrome. This tag is not personally identifiable, does not encode any information about when you obtained Google Chrome, and is the same as everyone who obtained Google Chrome the same way.

Because Chrome OS updates the entire OS stack, Google Update on Chrome OS also sends the current Chrome OS version and hardware model information to Google in order to ensure that the correct software updates and hardware manufacturer customizations such google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U apps, wallpaper, and help articles are delivered. This information is not personally identifiable, and is common to all users of Chrome OS on the same revision of device.

Unlike the desktop versions of Chrome, the delivery and management of updates for mobile versions of Chrome are managed through the app stores for Android and iOS. Mobile versions of Chrome utilize the servers described above for counting active installations and for user-initiated checks for updates.

Chrome extensions and applications that you’ve installed are kept up to date with a similar system used for updating desktop versions of Chrome. These update requests include similar information (such as the application ID, when the application was last used, and how long it’s been installed). We use these requests to determine the aggregate popularity and usage of applications and extensions. If you are using an extension or application restricted to a certain audience, authentication tokens are sent with the update requests for these add-ons. For security reasons, Chrome also occasionally sends a cookieless request to the Chrome Web Store, in order to verify that installed extensions and applications that claim to be from the store are genuine.

In order to keep updates as small as possible, Google Chrome is internally split into a variety of components, each of which can be updated independently. Each component is uniquely identified via an ID that is shared among all Google Chrome installations (e.g., “fmeadaodfnidclnjhlkdgjkolmhmfofk”). An update request for a component contains this ID, the hash of the previous download (called a "fingerprint"), and the component’s version. Because every installation has the same ID, and downloads of the same component have the same fingerprint, none of this information is personally identifiable.

If you install web apps on an Android device, a Google server is responsible for creating a native Android package that can be verified for authenticity by Chrome. When Chrome is updated or notices that the web app's manifest has changed, Chrome asks the server for a new version of the Ultraedit mac os crack - Crack Key For U package in a cookieless request. If the information needed to create the native Android package cannot be acquired by the server (e.g., because the information is behind a corporate firewall), Chrome sends it to Google and an Android package is created that is unique to you. It contains a unique and random identifier that is not tied to your identity.

Chrome may also download and run a binary executable (e.g., as part of the software update or to improve Safe Browsing protection). These executables are cryptographically signed and verified before execution. Chrome may download further static resources like dictionaries on demand to reduce the size of the installer.

On Windows and OS X versions of Chrome, the recovery component tries to repair Google Update when it’s broken. After the relevant binary is executed, Google Update uploads statistics on the actions that were performed. These statistics contain no personally identifiable information.

Network time

On desktop platforms, Chrome uses network time to verify SSL certificates, which are valid only for a specified time. At random intervals or when Chrome encounters an expired SSL certificate, Chrome may send requests to Google to obtain the time from a trusted source. These requests are more frequent if Chrome believes the system clock is inaccurate. These requests contain no cookies and are not logged on the server.

Counting installations

In order to measure the success rate of Google Chrome downloads and installations of the Windows version of Google Chrome, a randomly-generated token is included with Google Chrome's installer. This token is sent to Google during the installation process to confirm the success of that particular installation. A new token is generated for every install. It is not associated with any personal information, and is deleted once Google Chrome runs and checks for updates the first time.

For Chrome to know how many active installations it has, the mobile version of Chrome sends a ping to Google with a salted hash of a device identifier on an ongoing basis. The desktop version of Chrome does not send any stable identifier to count active installations. Instead an anonymous message to Google with a timestamp of the last ping is used to infer number of active installations.

Measuring effectiveness of a promotion

Chrome utilizes two measurements to understand how effective a promotional campaign has been: how many Chrome installations are acquired through a promotional campaign, and how much Chrome usage and traffic to Google is driven by a campaign.

To measure installations or reactivations of Chrome through a campaign, Chrome will send a token or an identifier unique to your device to Google at the first launch of Chrome, as well as the first search using Google. On desktop versions of Chrome, a token unique to your device is generated. The same token will be sent if Chrome is later reinstalled at first launch and at first use of the Omnibox after reinstallation or reactivation. Rather than storing the token on the computer, it is generated when necessary by using built-in system information that is scrambled in an irreversible manner. On iOS, Chrome uses the IDFA for counting installations acquired by a campaign, and it can be reset in iOS settings.

To measure searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular campaign, Chrome inserts a promotional tag, not unique to you or your device, in the searches you perform on Google. This non-unique tag contains information about how Chrome was obtained, the week when Chrome was installed, and the week when the first search was performed. For desktop versions of Chrome, Chrome generates a promotional tag, if the promotional installation token described in the previous paragraph indicates that Chrome has been installed or reactivated by a campaign on a device which has not been associated with any campaign yet. For Chrome on Mobile, a promotional tag is always sent regardless of the source of installations.

The promotional tag is generated using a software library called "RLZ" and looks similar to “1T4ADBR_enUS236US239”. The RLZ library was fully open-sourced in June 2010. For more information, please see the In the Open, for RLZ post on the Chromium blog and the article “How To Read An RLZ String”. On Android, this promotional tag can also be a readable string like "android-hms-tmobile-us" instead of an RLZ string, and is not unique to either you or your device.

This non-unique promotional tag is included when performing searches via Google (the tag appears as a parameter beginning with "rlz=" when triggered from the Omnibox, or as an “x-rlz-string” HTTP header). We use this information to measure the searches and Chrome usage driven by a particular promotion.

Tokens

If usage statistics and crash reports are enabled, the RLZ string is sent along with the report. This allows us to improve Chrome based on variations that are limited to specific geographic regions.

For the desktop version of Chrome, you can opt-out of sending this data to Google by uninstalling Chrome, and installing a version downloaded directly from www.google.com/chrome. To opt-out of sending the RLZ string in Chrome OS, press Ctrl + Alt + T to open the crosh shell, type rlz disable followed by the enter key, and then reboot your device.

Usage statistics and crash reports

Chrome has a feature to automatically send usage statistics and crash reports to Google in order to help improve Chrome’s feature set and stability.

Crash reports

Usage statistics contain information such as system information, preferences, user interface feature usage, responsiveness, performance, and memory usage. Crash reports contain system information gathered at the time of the crash, and may contain web page URLs, actions taken by the user before the crash, and/or personal information depending on what was happening at the time of the crash. This feature is enabled by default for Chrome installations of version 54 or later. You can control the feature in the "Sync and Google services" section of Chrome's settings.

When this feature is enabled, Google Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on your device, which is sent to Google along with your usage statistics and crash reports. The token does not contain any personal information and is used to de-duplicate reports and maintain accuracy in statistics. This token is deleted when the feature is disabled and a new token is regenerated when the feature is enabled again.

By default, the usage statistics do not include any personal information. However, if you're signed in to Chrome and have enabled Chrome sync, Chrome may combine your declared age and gender from your Google account with our statistics to help us build products better suited for your demographics. This demographic data is not included in crash reports.

Along with usage statistics and crash reports, Chrome also reports anonymous, randomized data that is constructed in a manner which is not linked to the unique token, and which ensures that no information can be inferred about any particular user's activity. This data collection mechanism is summarized on the Google research blog, and full technical details have been published in a technical report and presented at the 2014 ACM Computer and Communications Security conference.

Chrome will also anonymously report to Google if requests to websites operated by Google fail or succeed in order to detect and fix problems quickly.

If you have also turned on “Make searches and browsing better (Sends URLs of pages you visit to Google)” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings, Chrome usage statistics include information about the web pages you visit and your usage of them. The information will also include the URLs and statistics related to downloaded files. If you sync extensions, these statistics will also include information about the extensions that have been installed from Chrome Web Store. The URLs and statistics are sent along with a unique device identifier that can be reset by turning off “Make searches and browsing better” in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome’s settings or by turning off usage statistics and crash reports. The usage statistics are not tied to your Google account. Google only stores usage statistics associated with published extensions, and URLs that are known by Google’s web crawlers. We use this information to improve our products and services, for example, by identifying web pages which load slowly; this gives us insight into how to best improve overall Chrome performance. We also make some statistics available externally, through efforts like the Chrome User Experience Report. Externally published reports are conducted in highly aggregated manner to not reveal individual user's identity.

On iOS, if you are syncing your browsing history without a sync passphrase, Chrome reports usage for certain URLs that other Google apps could open. For example, when you tap on an email address, Chrome presents a dialog that allows you to choose between opening with Google Gmail or other mail apps installed on your device. The usage information also includes which apps were presented to you, which one was selected, and if a Google app was installed. Chrome does not log the actual URL tapped. If you are signed in, this usage is tied to your Google account. If you are signed out, the information is sent to Google with a unique device identifier that can be regenerated by resetting the Google Usage ID found in Chrome settings. The raw reports are deleted within 60 days, after which only the aggregated statistics remain.

Google Surveys in Chrome

In Chrome on Android and Desktop, when you have "send usage statistics" enabled, you may be randomly selected to participate in surveys to evaluate consumer satisfaction with Chrome features. If you are selected, Chrome requests a survey from Google for you. If a survey is available, Chrome then asks you to answer the survey and submit responses to Google.

The survey also records basic metrics about your actions, such as time spent looking at the survey and elements that the user clicked. These metrics are sent to Google even if you do not fully complete the survey.

Google uses strategies to ensure that surveys are spread evenly across users and not repeatedly served to a single user. On Android, Chrome stores a randomly generated unique token on the device. On Desktop, Chrome uses a cookie to connect with the server. This token or cookie is used solely for the survey requests and does not contain any personal information. If you disable sending usage statistics, the token or cookie will be cleared.

Chrome browser showing a survey

Suggestions for spelling errors

Desktop versions of Chrome can provide smarter spell-checking by sending text you type into the browser to Google's servers, allowing you to apply the same spell-checking technology that’s used by Google products like Docs. If this feature is enabled, Smadav 2018 crack free download - Activators Patch sends the entire contents of text fields as you type in them to Google, along with the browser’s default language. Google returns a list of suggested spellings that are displayed in the context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Requests are logged temporarily and anonymously for debugging and quality improvement purposes.

This feature is disabled by default; to turn VideoSolo Video Converter Ultimate 2.2.6 Crack With Latest Version Free on, click “Ask Google for suggestions” in the context menu that appears when you right-click on a misspelled word. You can also turn this feature on or off with the “Enhanced spell check” checkbox in the “Sync and Google services” section of Chrome settings. When the feature is turned off, spelling suggestions are generated locally without sending data to Google's servers.

Mobile versions of Chrome rely on the operating system to provide spell-checking.

Translate

Google Chrome’s built-in translation feature helps you read more of the Web, regardless of the language of the web page. The feature is enabled by default.

Translate

Translation can be disabled at any time in Chrome’s settings.

Language detection is done entirely using a client-side library, and does not involve any Google servers. For translation, the contents of a web page are only sent to Google if you decide to have it translated. You can do that on an individual basis on each page that shows a translation option or for all pages in a specific language by choosing “Always translate” in the Translate UI. Additionally, you can do so by clicking on a translated search result on the Google Search Results Page.

If you do choose to translate a web page, the text of that page is sent to Google Translate for translation. Your cookies are not sent along with that request and the request is sent over SSL. This communication with Google's translation service is covered by the Google privacy policy.

If you’ve chosen to sync your Chrome history, statistics about the languages of pages you visit and about your interactions with the translation feature will be sent to Google to improve Chrome’s understanding of the languages you speak and when Chrome should offer to translate text for you.

Image Descriptions for screen reader users

Chrome can provide automatic descriptions for users who are visually impaired by sending the contents of images on pages you visit to Google's servers. This feature is only enabled when Chrome detects that the user has a screen reader running and if the user explicitly enables it in the page context menu. Cookies are not sent along with these requests. Chrome fetches the list of supported languages from Google's servers and then requests descriptions in the most appropriate language given the current web page and the user's language preferences. Requests are not logged.

Sign In to Chrome and sync

You have the option to use the Chrome browser while signed in to your Google Account, with or without sync enabled.

On desktop versions of Chrome, signing into or out of any Google web service, like google.com, signs you into or out of Chrome. On Chrome on Android, when you sign into any Google web service, Chrome may offer you to sign in with the accounts that Wondershare Dr.Fone Full Toolkit Crack already signed in on the device. Signing into Chrome via this dialog doesn’t turn on sync. If you want to just sign in to the Google web service and not to Chrome, you can dismiss the dialog and enter your credentials manually in the web form in the background. If you are signed in to Chrome, Chrome may offer to save your passwords, payment cards and related billing information to your Google Account. Chrome may also offer you the option of filling passwords or payment cards from your Google Account into web forms. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether WonderFox DVD Video Converter 17.1 License key - Crack Key For U want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in.

When you’re signed-in and have enabled sync with your Google Account, your personal browsing data information is saved in your Google Account so you may access it when you sign in and sync to Chrome on other computers and devices. Synced data can include bookmarks, saved passwords, open tabs, browsing history, extensions, addresses, phone numbers, payment methods, and more. In advanced sync settings, you can choose which types of data to synchronize with this device. By default, all syncable data types are enabled. You can turn sync on or off in the “You and Google” section of Chrome settings.

If you have turned on sync and signed out of the account you are syncing to, sync will pause sending all syncable data to Google until you sign back in with the same account. Some sync data types (such as bookmarks and passwords) that are saved locally while sync is paused will automatically be synced to your account after you sign back in with the same account.

On mobile versions of Chrome, you can turn sync on or off in Chrome settings. This can be done for any account that has already been added to the mobile device without authenticating again.

On both desktop and mobile, signing into Chrome keeps you signed into Google web services until you sign out of Chrome. On mobile, signing into Chrome will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that have been added to the device. On desktop, it will keep you signed in with all Google Accounts that you added from a Google web service, unless you have set “Clear cookies and site data when you quit Chrome” in your cookie settings.

On Android and desktop, Chrome signals to Google web services that you are signed into Chrome by attaching an X-Chrome-Connected header to any HTTPS requests to Google-owned domains. On iOS, the CHROME_CONNECTED cookie is used instead. On Android, Chrome sends the X-Chrome-Connected header to accounts.google.com to indicate it is eligible for account consistency (meaning that you can sign in to Chrome and Google web services with the Google Accounts already present on your device). This allows those Google google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U services to update their UI accordingly. On desktop, Chrome sends the X-Chrome-ID-Consistency-Request header with all HTTPS requests to account.google.com if the “Allow Chrome sign-in” setting is enabled. If you are using a managed device, your system admin may disable the sign in feature or require that data be deleted when you disconnect your account.

Users can share phone numbers and text between their devices (mobile or desktop) when they are signed-in to Chrome. The transferred data is encrypted during transit and Google cannot read or store the content. To let users select the device to share with, Chrome collects the following information about devices on which a user is signed-in and stores that in folder lock without software - Crack Key For U user's Google account: device manufacturer, model number, Chrome version, OS, and device type.

Google uses your personal synchronized data to provide you a consistent browsing experience across your devices, and to customize features in Chrome. You can manage your synchronized history by going to chrome://history in your Chrome browser. If “Include history from Chrome and other apps in your Web & App Activity” is checked on the Web & App Activity controls page, Google also uses your synchronized browsing data to provide personalized Google products and services to you. You can change your preference any time, and manage individual activities associated with your Google account.

The paragraph above describes the use of your personal browsing history. Google also uses aggregated and anonymized synchronized browsing data to improve other Google products and services. For example, we use this information to improve Google Search by helping to detect mobile friendly pages, pages which have stopped serving content, and downloads of malware.

For sync users, Google may collect additional information derived from Chrome history for the Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) experiment. FLoC is one of the open standards proposed as part of the Privacy Sandbox, an initiative to make the web more private and secure for users while also supporting publishers. Chrome’s implementation of FLoC assigns each user to an interest cohort - a cluster representing a large group of users who share similar browsing habits - and periodically updates this assignment by similarity-hashing recently visited URLs from navigation history. As a first step in the FLoC experiments, Google is logging users' cohorts via sync if you are syncing history without a custom passphrase, and if “Include Chrome history and activity from sites, apps, and devices that use Google services” in your Google Activity Controls as well as “Also use your activity & information from Google services to personalize ads on websites and apps that partner with Google to show ads” in your Google Ad Settings are enabled. Google will use logged interest cohorts to perform an internal privacy analysis before making them available to the web ecosystem for broader testing.

If you would like to use Google's cloud to store and sync your Chrome data without allowing any personalized and aggregated use by Google as described in the previous paragraphs, you can choose to encrypt all of your synced data with a sync passphrase. If you choose this option, it’s important to note that Google won’t have access to the sync passphrase you set; we won’t be able to help you recover data if you forget the passphrase. Regardless of how you choose to encrypt your data, all data is always sent over secure SSL connections to Google’s servers.

Google will store the metadata about the days on which sync was running to improve other Google products and services.

Chrome may help you sign in with credentials you've saved in Android apps on websites that are associated with the respective apps. Likewise, credentials you've saved for websites can be used to help you sign into related Android apps. You can view the credentials you've saved in Chrome and Android by visiting passwords.google.com in any browser. If you've saved credentials for Android applications, Chrome periodically sends a cookieless request to Google to get an updated list of websites that are associated with those applications. To stop websites and Android apps from automatically signing in using credentials you previously saved, you can turn off Auto Sign-In on passwords.google.com or in Chrome settings under "Autofill > Passwords". For more details see this article.

To make the history page easier to use, Chrome displays favicons of visited URLs. For Chrome browsing history from your other devices, these favicons are fetched from Google servers via cookieless requests that only contain the given URL and device display DPI. Favicons are not fetched for users with sync passphrase.

On the iOS version of Chrome, if you sync your browsing history without a sync passphrase and your browser’s usage statistics and crash reports setting is also enabled, your usage statistics and crash reports will include statistics about the pages you visit. You can read more in the Usage statistics and crash reports section of this Whitepaper.

All data synchronized through Google’s servers is subject to Google’s Privacy Policy. To get an overview of the Chrome data stored for your Google Account, go to the Chrome section of Google Dashboard. That page also allows you to stop synchronization completely and delete all sync data from Google’s servers.

Autofill and Password Management

Google Chrome has a form autofill feature that helps you fill Atomic Email Hunter 15.16.0.468 Crack+ Registration Key Free 2021 forms on the web more quickly. Autofill is enabled by default, but it can be turned off at any time in Chrome’s settings.

If Autofill is enabled and you encounter a web page containing a form, Chrome sends some information about that form to Google. This information includes the basic structure of the form, a hash of the web page's hostname as well as form identifiers (such as field names); randomized representation of the form identifiers, and if you have turned on the "Make searches and browsing better (Sends URLs of pages you visit to Google)" setting, also a randomized representation of the web page's URL. In response, Chrome receives a prediction of each field’s data type (for example, “field X is a phone number, and field Y is a country”). This information helps Chrome match up your locally stored Autofill data with the fields of the form.

If Autofill is enabled when you submit a form, Chrome sends Google some information about the form along with the types of data you submitted. This information includes a hash of the web page’s hostname, as well as form identifiers (such as field names), the basic structure of the form, and the observed data types for the fields (i.e., field X was a phone number, field Y was a country). The values you entered into the form are not sent to Google. This information helps Chrome improve the quality of its form-filling over time.

You can manage your Autofill entries via Chrome’s settings, and you can edit or delete saved information at any time. Chrome will never store full credit card information (card number, cardholder name, and expiration date) without explicit confirmation. In order to prevent offering to save cards you have shown disinterest in saving, Chrome stores the last idm crack for pc - Free Activators digits of detected credit cards locally on the device. If you scan your credit card using a phone camera, the recognition is performed locally.

Chrome may help you sign in to websites with credentials you've saved to Chrome's password manager or your Google Account by autofilling sign-in forms, by offering you an account picker, or by automatically signing you in. You can manage and delete your saved credentials in the “Forms and passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. If you enable password management, the same kind of data about forms as described above is sent to Google to interpret password forms correctly. To enable Chrome to offer password generation that meets site-specific requirements, Chrome uploads a randomized vote on a specific password characteristic to the server once a user-created password is stored. If stored credentials are used for the first time in a username field which was already filled differently by the website itself, Chrome also transmits a short one-byte hash of the prefilled value. This allows Google to classify if the website uses a static placeholder in the username field which can be safely overwritten without deleting valuable user-specific data. Google cannot reconstruct the value from this hash. PowerBuilder Crack

When you’re signed in to Chrome with your Google Account on desktop, Chrome may offer you to use credentials you’ve saved to your account, to generate a strong password, or to save credentials Simplify3D 5.0 Crack With Serial Keys Full Free Download [2021-Version] your Google Account. To access credentials in your Google Account, Chrome may ask you to re-authenticate to your Google Account. Credentials from your Google Account will be available on the device while you’re signed in, even when you are offline. If sync isn’t enabled, when you sign out of Chrome, all credentials stored in your Google Account are removed from Chrome on the device. While signed in to Chrome, you can choose to store a credential after you have signed into a site to your Google Account or locally to grammarly alternative free - Crack Key For U device. Locally-saved credentials are not deleted when you sign out of Chrome. After you have used a locally-saved credential to sign into a site, Chrome may also offer you to move the locally stored credentials to your account.

When you sign in KeepVid Pro V8 Crack Plus Serial Key Free Download [Lifetime] a site, Chrome may give you a warning if the username/password have been exposed as a result of a data breach on some website or app. The feature is available on all platforms but only to the users signed in with a Google account. On Android the feature is only available if sync is also enabled, due to the way the accounts are managed by the OS. Being signed in to a Google account is a technical requirement that prevents abuse of the API. When you sign in to a website, Chrome will send a hashed copy of your username and password to Google encrypted with a secret key only known to Chrome. No one, including Google, is able to derive your username or password from this encrypted copy. From the response, Chrome can tell if the submitted username and password appear in the database of leaked credentials. The final resolution is done locally; Google doesn’t know whether or not the credential is present in the database. The feature can be disabled in settings under Sync and Google services. On desktop and Android versions of Chrome, this feature is not available if Safe Browsing is turned off.

Using the same secure method described above, you can check all the saved passwords against the public data breaches in the “Passwords” section of Chrome’s settings. Once you’ve run a password check, Chrome will show a list of breached passwords. If a password in this list is outdated, you can manually edit it to store the current version. If you choose to edit, the new username/password pair will be checked automatically but only if the feature described above is not disabled.

Also, if you choose, you can bring your Autofill data with you to all your Chrome-enabled devices by syncing it as part of your browser settings (see the “Sign In to Chrome” section of this document). If you choose to sync Autofill information, field values are sent as described in “Sign In to Chrome”; otherwise, field values are not sent.

If you enable Chrome’s credential provider extension in iOS Autofill passwords settings, Chrome will be able to autofill the passwords currently saved in Chrome into other apps on your device, such as Safari. The extension does not store Chrome passwords. If the device's keychain or the iCloud keychain are enabled as a credential provider, then the extension will prompt you to save the recently used password in the keychain.

Payments

When you’re signed into Chrome with your Google Account, Chrome may offer to save payment cards and related billing addresses into payment data under the same Google Account, and include cards from your account among the autofill suggestions on payment web forms. If you're not signed in, Chrome offers to save your credit cards locally. If the card is not stored locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication, such as Touch ID, Windows Hello, or Android screen lock, each time you use the card. In some versions of Chrome, it is possible to store a card to Google Payments and locally in Chrome at the same time, in which case Chrome will not ask for a CVV or device authentication confirmation. If you have cards stored in this way, their local copies will persist until you sign out of your Google account, at which point the local copy will be deleted from your device. If you choose not to store the card locally, you will be prompted for your CVV code or device authentication each time you use the card. You can opt out of using device authentication in the Payment methods section of Chrome settings. If you use a card from Google Payments, Chrome will collect information about your computer and share it with Google Payments to prevent fraudulent use of your card. If you use device authentication to confirm cards from Google Payments, an identifier scoped to a device and signed-in session will be used to ensure that the device and account autofilling the card should have access to it.

To delete credit card information saved in Chrome, follow the “Add and edit credit cards” steps in the Autofill article. When you delete a credit card that's also saved in your Google Payments account, you will be redirected to Google Payments to complete the deletion. After your card has been deleted from your Google Payments account, Chrome will automatically remove that card from your Autofill suggestions.

To save a card locally on the device only, while still being signed in to Chrome with a Google Account, you can add a card from the “Add” button in the “Payment methods” section in Chrome settings. If you would like to sign into Google web services, like google.com, without Chrome asking whether you want to save your info to your Google Account, you can turn off Chrome sign-in. If you have sync turned on, you can disable syncing payment methods and addresses to Google Pay under “Sync” in Chrome settings. You can also turn the Payments Autofill feature off altogether in settings.

Chrome also supports the PaymentRequest API by allowing you to pay for purchases with credit cards from Autofill, Google Payments, and other payment apps already installed on your device. Google Payments and other payment apps are only available on Android devices. PaymentRequest allows the merchant to request the following information: full name, shipping address, billing address, phone number, email, credit card number, credit card expiration, CVV, and Google Payments credentials. Information is not shared with the merchant until you agree.

Geolocation

Google Chrome supports the Geolocation API, which provides access to fine-grained user location information with your consent.

By default, Chrome will request your permission when a web page asks for your location information, and does not send any location information to the web page unless you explicitly consent.

Furthermore, whenever you are on a web page which is using your location information, Chrome will display a location icon on the right side of the omnibox. You can click on this icon in order to find out more information or manage location settings.

Maps

In Chrome’s settings, by clicking “Site Google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U and scrolling to the “Location” section, you can choose to allow all sites to receive your location information, have Chrome ask you every time (the default), or block all sites from receiving your location information. You can also configure exceptions for specific web sites.

In the Android version of Chrome, your default search engine automatically receives your location when you conduct a search. On the iOS version of Chrome, by default your location is sent to Google if you conduct a search from the omnibox. Read more about how your default search engine handles geolocation and how to manage your settings in the Omnibox section of the whitepaper.

If you do choose to share your location with a web site, Chrome will send local network information to Google (also used by other browsers such as Mozilla Firefox) in order to estimate your location. This local network information can include data about nearby Wi-Fi access points or cellular signal sites/towers (even if you’re not using them), and your computer’s IP address. The requests are logged, and aggregated and anonymized before being used to operate, support, and improve the overall quality of Google Chrome and Google Location Services.

For further reading on the privacy and user interface implications of the Geolocation API (as well as other HTML5 APIs), see ”Practical Privacy Concerns in a Real World Browser” written by two Google Chrome team members.

Speech to text

Chrome supports the Web Speech API, a mechanism for converting speech to text on a web page. It uses Google's servers to perform the conversion. Using the feature sends an audio recording to Google (audio data is not sent directly to the page itself), along with the domain of the website using the API, your default browser language and the language settings of the website. Cookies are not sent along with these requests.

Google Assistant on Chrome OS devices

The Google Assistant is integrated into some models of Chrome OS devices. If you opt in to the feature, Chrome OS listens for you to say "Ok Google" and sends the audio of the next thing you say, plus a few seconds before, to Google. Detection of the phrase "Ok Google" is performed locally on your computer, and the audio is only sent to Google after it detects "Ok Google". You can enable or disable this feature in Google Assistant Settings.

Enabling this feature in Chrome Settings will cause Chrome to listen whenever the screen is unlocked. On Chrome OS devices with a local audio processor, the device also listens when Wavebox 4.9.0 Download - Crack Key For U device is asleep. On these devices, The Google Assistant feature only works if Voice & Audio Activity is enabled for your Google account. Chrome will prompt you to enable Voice & Audio Activity for the associated Google account if it is disabled.

Once the audio has been converted to text, a search with that text is submitted to Google. If you have used the “Ok Google” search before on a device but turned off Voice & Audio Activity later, your device is still capable of processing your voice and sending the audio to Google but the voice is deleted shortly thereafter.

You can determine your Chrome OS device’s behavior by examining the text in the "Search and Assistant" section of settings.

Google Assistant on Android devices

You can quickly complete tasks on the web using the Google Assistant in Chrome on certain Android devices. If you opt-in to this feature, you can speak to the Google Assistant and ask it to search websites. It also can fill out forms on your behalf, or speed up the checkout experience.

For example, if you issue a command to the Google Assistant e.g. “search Wikipedia for Henry VIII”, the Google Assistant in Chrome will respond by opening Chrome to Wikipedia, sending the query as a text string to Google Assistant in Chrome, and searching for “Henry VIII” on the Wikipedia page.

As another example, if you ask the Google Assistant to help you purchase tickets for an upcoming movie, then the address of the website you are viewing, your credit card information, and your email address will be shared with Google to complete the transaction and make it possible for you to receive the purchase receipt and movie ticket.

If you opt-in to this feature, the Google Assistant in Chrome will send data to Google in order to complete the command you issued. When the command is issued, the Google Assistant in Chrome shares back to Google the website’s URL to validate that the webpage is allowed to be automated by Google Assistant in Chrome and to receive the instructions on how to complete the task (e.g. on how to fill out a form).

At the time the command you issued is executed, additional information can be shared. Depending on the command you issued, the information shared with Google can include the address of the website you are viewing, your email address, your name, your delivery and billing address, your credit card information, and possibly the username you use to log into the website. This information is not stored by Google — rather, this information is passed on to the third party website to complete the command you issued to the Google Assistant. Additionally, information about your system is collected in order to improve the product and to debug issues.

To personalize future actions Google Assistant in Chrome will save configuration information about the Filmora 8.3.5 Keygen you issued to improve your future experiences (for example: seat selections, number and types of movie tickets, etc.). This information is saved to your Google Account.

Some Google Assistant features are not available on Incognito tabs. You can turn off the ability to use the Google Assistant in Chrome on your Android device by toggling the “Google Assistant for Chrome” option in Chrome’s settings.

Google Cloud Print

The Google Cloud Print feature allows you to print documents from your browser over the Internet. You do not need a direct connection between the machine that executes Chrome and your printer.

If you choose to print a web page via Cloud Print, Chrome will generate a PDF of this website and upload it over an encrypted network connection to Google’s servers. If you choose to easeus partition master free other kinds of documents, they may be uploaded as raw documents to Google’s servers.

A print job will be downloaded by either a Chrome browser (“Connector”) or a Cloud Print capable printer that you selected when printing the website. In some cases the print job must be submitted to a third-party service to print (HP’s ePrint, for example).

The print job is deleted from Google’s servers when any of three criteria is met:

  • You delete the print job
  • The job has been printed and marked as printed by the printer/connector
  • The job has been queued on Google’s servers for 30 days

You can manage your printers and print jobs on the Google Cloud Print website.

SSL certificate reporting

Chrome stores locally a list of expected SSL certificate information for a variety of high-value websites, in an effort to prevent man-in-the-middle attacks. For Google websites and other websites that choose to opt in, Chrome will report a possible attack or misconfiguration. If the certificate provided by the web server doesn’t match the expected signature, Chrome reports information about the SSL certificate chain to Google or to a report collection endpoint of the website's choosing. Chrome sends these reports only for certificate chains that use a public root of trust.

You can enable this feature by opting in to report data relevant to security, as described in the Safe Browsing section. While you are opted in, two kinds of reports may be sent to Google’s security team. Each time you see an SSL error page, a report will be sent containsing the SSL certificate chain, the server's hostname, the local time, and relevant details about the validation error and SSL error page type. Additionally, each time a mismatch between different certificate verifiers is detected, a report will be sent containing the certificate chain and the verification result.

Because Chrome sends these reports for all certificate chains, even those that chain to a private root of trust, these chains can contain personally identifiable information. You can opt out anytime by unchecking the box “Help Improve Chrome security” in “Privacy and security > Security”.

The SSL certificate reporting feature is not available on Chrome iOS.

Installed Applications and Extensions

Users can install external apps and extensions for the desktop versions of Chrome to add features to or customize their Chrome browsers. Installing an application or extension from the Chrome Web Store directly or via an inline installation flow on a third-party site involves a request to the Chrome Web Store for details about the application. This request includes cookies, and if you’re logged into Google when you install an application, that installation is recorded as part of your Google account. The store uses this information to recommend applications to you in the future, and in aggregate to evaluate application popularity and usage. As noted above, applications and extensions are updated via Google Update.

As they're more deeply integrated An Application - Activators Patch Chrome, applications and extensions that you choose to install can request access to additional capabilities, enabling functionality that doesn't make sense on the web at large: background notifications or raw socket access, for instance. These additional permissions may change the way your data is collected and shared, as extensions and applications might have access to data regarding the websites you visit, and might be capable of monitoring or modifying your interactions with the web. When installing an application or extension, Chrome may first warn you about certain capabilities. Please do take the time to read and evaluate this warning before proceeding with the installation. Note also that interactions with and data collected by these third-party applications and extensions are governed by their own privacy policies, not Google's privacy policy.

Push messaging

Your device may receive push messages from the backend servers of apps and extensions installed in Chrome, websites that you grant the “notification” permission to, and your default search engine. Disabling push messages from your default search engine is done in the same way as disabling push messages from any site, by visiting the “Notifications” section of “Site settings”.

Push message data is sent over a secure channel from the developer through Google’s infrastructure to Chrome on your device, which can wake up apps, extensions, and websites (including your default search engine) to deliver the message. The developer may end-to-end encrypt the message data, or may send it in a form such that Google servers process it as plain text. Google servers retain up to 4 weeks’ worth of messages to ensure delivery to users even if their devices are offline at the time of the initial pushing.

If the notification permission is set to “granted” for any website (including the default search engine), or you have an app or extension installed that uses push messaging, then Chrome provides the app’s, extension’s, or website’s server with one or more registration tokens that can be used to send messages to the entity (app, extension, or website). Websites you visit in Incognito mode are not allowed to send you push messages and therefore cannot get a registration token.

When you uninstall an app or extension, revoke the notification permission for a website, or clear cookies for a permitted website, its registration token is revoked and will not be reused, even if the same app or extension is re-installed or the same website is re-visited. Registration tokens used by Chrome components such as Sync are revoked once they are no longer in use (for example, when the user disables Sync). When a registration token is revoked, the associated entity on your device stops receiving messages sent from its developer’s server.

The registration tokens that are passed to entities contain an encrypted device ID, which is used for routing the messages. Google can decrypt the device ID, but other entities cannot, and the encryption is designed so that two registration tokens for the same device ID cannot be correlated. On desktop versions of Chrome, the device ID is reset when the Chrome profile is removed, or when neither Chrome Sync nor any of the entities requires it for push messaging. On Android, the lifetime of the device ID is governed by the operating system and is independent of Chrome. Any messages routed to registration tokens containing a revoked device ID will not be delivered.

Chrome custom tabs

On Android devices, an app developer may use a Custom Tab to show web content when you click on a URL from their app. A Custom Tab may look different from a regular Chrome tab, for example it may have app-specified visual style, and the absence of an editable URL bar. Despite the different visual style a Custom Tab may have, the data sent and received in the Custom Tab, such as cookies, saved passwords and browsing history function the same way they do in a normal Chrome tab. The Custom Tab is an app-customized view using the same underlying user profile.

With Chrome Custom Tabs, an Android app developer may also specify custom actions in the Chrome toolbar and overflow menu that are relevant to their app, for example,"share", “save page”, “copy URL”. If you tap on such a button, the address of the current website is shared with the application.

An application can request Chrome to pre-render a given URL in the background. This allows Chrome to show you a pre-loaded site instantly when you open it from the app. At the same time it allows an application to set cookies in your browser in the background. To disable pre-rendering, you can uncheck "Preload pages for faster browsing and searching" in the “Privacy and security > Cookies” section of Chrome’s settings.

Trusted Web Activities are a form of Chrome Custom Tab where the top bar is not present, allowing web browsing with no browser UI but with access to the cookie jar. They can only be used to view web content on an origin that the client app can prove that it owns using Digital Asset Links. If the user navigates off this origin the the top bar reappears.

When the client app is uninstalled or has its data cleared through Android Settings, Chrome will allow the user to clear data for sibelius ultimate 2019 crack - Crack Key For U linked origin.

Continue where you left off

If you have selected the option to “Continue where you left off” in settings on desktop versions of Chrome, when you open Chrome, it attempts to bring you right back to the way things were when the browser was closed. Chrome reloads the tabs you had open and persists session information to get you up and running as quickly as possible. This feature effectively extends a browsing session across restarts. In this mode, session cookies are no longer deleted when the browser closes; instead, they remain available on restart to keep you logged into your favorite sites.

On desktop versions of Chrome, this feature can be enabled or disabled in Chrome settings. On Chrome OS, it is enabled by default.

On OS X, when you restart your device, a checkbox in the OS confirmation dialog asks you whether you want to re-open applications and windows after restart. If you check this box, Chrome restores tabs and windows, as well as the session cookies, even if you have disabled "Continue where you left off" on Chrome.

On mobile versions of Chrome, this feature is always enabled without a setting.

Chrome Variations

Chrome is constantly evolving to better meet the needs of users and the web. To ensure new features are providing the best experience and working correctly, they may be enabled for a subset of users before they are fully launched. For example, if we improve how page loading works in Chrome, we may try it out for 1%% of users to ensure that it doesn't crash or run slower before launching to everyone. This is done through a system called "Chrome Variations" - also known as "field trials".

A given Chrome installation may be participating in a number of different variations (for different features) at the same time. These fall into two categories:

  1. Low entropy variations, which are randomized based on a number from 0 to 7999 (13 bits) that's randomly generated by each Chrome installation on the first run.
  2. High entropy variations, which are randomized using the usage statistics token for Chrome installations that have usage statistics reporting enabled.

Other factors may additionally inform the variations assigned to a Chrome installation, such as country (determined by your IP address), operating system, Chrome version and other parameters.

Usage statistics and crash reports are tagged microsoft office 365 - Free Activators all variations a client participates in, including both low entropy and high entropy variations. These reports, which also contain a pseudonymous client identifier, can be disabled in Chrome settings.

Additionally, a subset of low entropy variations are included in network requests sent to Google. The combined state of these variations is non-identifying, since it is based on a 13-bit low entropy value (see above). These are transmitted using the "X-Client-Data" HTTP header, which contains a list of active variations. On Android, this header may include a limited set of external server-side experiments, which may affect the Chrome installation. This header is used to evaluate the effect on Google servers - for example, a networking change may affect YouTube video load speed or an Omnibox ranking update may result in more helpful Google Search results.

On Android Chrome, in certain cases these low entropy variations may also be sent to Google apps when cross-app communication occurs to support a Chrome feature; for example, when searching with Google Lens. This information is used to better understand how Chrome experiments affect that Google feature: for example, Chrome memory usage change could affect how long it takes an action in the Google app to complete.

You can reset the variations used by your Chrome installation by starting it with the “--reset-variation-state” command line flag.

Do Not Track

If you enable the “Do Not Track” preference in Chrome’s settings, Chrome will send a DNT:1 HTTP header with your outgoing HTTP, HTTPS and SPDY browsing traffic (Chrome cannot, however, guarantee that NPAPI plugins also send the header.) The header will not be sent with system traffic such as the geolocation, metrics or device management services.

The effect of Do Not Track depends on whether a website responds to the request, and how the request is interpreted. For example, some websites may respond to this request by showing you ads that aren't based on other websites you've visited. Many websites will still collect and use your browsing data - for example, to improve security; to provide content, services, ads and recommendations on their websites; and to generate reporting statistics.

Chrome on iOS now uses WKWebView to provide a more stable and faster browser. As a result of this move, the Do Not Track preference is no longer available due to iOS constraints. If Apple makes changes to allow this feature, Chrome will make Do Not Track available again in iOS.

Plugins

Chrome ships with an Adobe Flash Player implementation that is based on the Pepper API. Flash and other Pepper-based plugins may ask you for “Access to your computer”. If you grant this permission, the plugin is granted unsandboxed access. This allows content providers to offer you access to DRM protected content like videos or music but may have security and privacy implications, so consider carefully whether you trust a plugin or website with this privilege.

Media licenses

Some websites encrypt media to protect against unauthorized access and copying. When users play media from these sites, they typically log into the site, which authenticates the user, and then digital rights management negotiates a key exchange for the decryption and playback of the media.

For HTML5 sites, this key exchange is done using the Encrypted Media Extensions API. The implementation of that API is tightly coupled with the browser to protect user privacy and security, through Content Decryption Modules (CDM), which are provided by digital rights management solutions such as Google Widevine or Microsoft PlayReady.

When a user asks Chrome to play encrypted HTML5 media (for example, watching a movie on Google Play Movies), Chrome will generate a request for a license to decrypt that media. This license request contains an automatically generated request ID, which is created by the Content Decryption Module, as well as proof that the CDM is legitimate. After generation, the license request is typically sent to a license server managed by either the content website or Google. Neither the license request, the proof, nor the request ID include any personally identifying information. After being sent, the license request is not stored locally on the user’s device.

As part of the license request, Chrome also generates a unique session ID which does not contain personally identifying information. This session ID is sent to the license server, and when the server returns a license the session ID is used to decrypt the media. The session ID may be stored locally even after the site has been closed. The license may also be stored locally for offline consumption of protected content. Session ID and licenses may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

When returning a license, the site license server may include a client ID, generated by the site. This client ID is unique to the user and the site, it is not shared between sites. If provided, the client ID is stored locally and included by Chrome in subsequent license requests to that site. The client ID may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

On some platforms, the website may additionally request verification that the device is eligible to play specific types of protected content. On Chrome OS, this is known as Verified Access. In this case, Google creates a certificate using a unique hardware identifier for the device. This hardware ID identifies the device, but does not CyberLink PowerDirector Ultimate the user. If the user agrees, Google receives the hardware ID and generates a certificate verifying the device for the requested site. The certificate does not include the hardware ID or any other information that could permanently identify the device. Certificates are stored locally similar to other cached browsing data, and may be cleared by the user in Chrome using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected. On Android, this is called Provisioning. See “MediaDrm Provisioning” for more details.

Some sites Adobe Audition CC 2021 Crack v14.4.0.38 Full Version (Completecrack) Flash instead of HTML5. If a website google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U visit chooses to use Adobe Flash Access DRM protection, Chrome for Windows and Chrome OS will give Adobe Flash access to a device identifier. You can deny this access in the settings under Content Settings, Protected content, and reset the ID using Clear Browsing Data with “Cookies and other site data” selected.

In order to give you access to licensed music, the Google Play Music app can retrieve a device identifier that is derived from your hard drive partitions or, on a Chrome OS or Linux installation, from a unique file on your disk. This identifier can be reset by reinstalling your operating system.

MediaDrm provisioning

Chrome on Android uses Android MediaDrm to play protected content. As on ChromeOS, the website may request verification that the device is eligible to do so. This is achieved by MediaDrm provisioning. A provisioning request is sent to Google, which generates a certificate that will be stored on the device and sent to the site whenever you play protected content. The information in the provisioning request and in the certificate vary depending on the Android version. In all cases, the information can be used to identify the device, but never the user.

On Android K and L, the device only needs to be provisioned once and the certificate is shared by all applications running on the device. The request contains a hardware ID, and the certificate contains a stable device ID, both of which could be used to permanently identify the device.

On Android M or later, MediaDrm supports per-origin provisioning. Chrome randomly generates an origin ID for each website to be provisioned. Even though the request still contains a hardware ID, the certificate is different for each website, so that different websites cannot cross-reference the same device.

On Android O or later on some devices, provisioning can be scoped to a single application. The request will contain a hardware ID, but the certificate will be different for each application, in addition to each site, so different applications cannot cross-reference the same device.

Provisioning can be controlled by the “Protected media” permission in the “Site settings” menu. On Android versions K and L, Chrome will always ask you to grant this permission before provisioning starts. On later versions of Android, this permission is granted by default. You can clear the provisioned certificates anytime using the “Cookies and other site data” option in the Clear browsing data dialog.

Chrome also performs MediaDrm pre-provisioning to support playback of protected content in cases where the provisioning server is not accessible, such as in-flight entertainment. Chrome randomly generates a list of origin IDs and provision them in advance for future use.

On Android versions with per-device provisioning, where provisioning requires a permission, Chrome does not support pre-provisioning. Playback might still work because the device could have already been provisioned by other applications.

On Android versions with per-origin provisioning, Chrome pre-provisions itself once the user attempts to play protected content. As the provisioning for the first playback already involved sending a stable hardware ID to Google, the subsequent pre-provisioning of additional origin IDs introduces no new privacy implications. If provisioning fails and there is no pre-provisioned origin ID, Chrome may ask for permission to further fallback to per-device provisioning.

On devices with per-application provisioning, Chrome pre-provisions itself automatically on startup.

Cloud policy

When you sign into a Chrome OS device, Chrome on Android, or a desktop Chrome profile with an account associated with a Google Apps domain, or if your desktop browser is enrolled in Chrome Browser Cloud Management, Chrome checks whether the domain has configured enterprise policies. If so, the Chrome OS user session, Chrome profile, or enrolled Chrome Browser is assigned a unique ID, and registered as belonging to that Google Apps domain. Any configured policies are applied. To revoke the registration, remove the Chrome OS user, sign out of Chrome on Android, remove the desktop profile, or remove the enrollment token and device token for Chrome Browser Cloud Management.

Additionally, Chrome OS devices can be enrolled to a Google Apps domain by a domain admin. This will enforce enterprise policies for the entire device, such as providing shared network configurations and restricting access to developer mode. When a Chrome OS device is enrolled to a domain, then a unique device ID is registered to the device. In order to revoke the registration, the admin will need to wipe the entire Chrome OS device.

Registered profiles and devices check for policy changes periodically (every 3 hours by default). In some cases, the server pushes policy changes to the client without waiting for Chrome's periodic check. Unregistered profiles check whether a policy has been turned on for their domain each time Chrome starts up.

The policy list contains details about the types of configurations that are available via Cloud Policy.

Lite Mode

If you enable Lite Mode (previously known as “Data Saver”), Chrome may send your traffic through Google's optimizing servers to reduce the amount of data downloaded and speed up your page loads.

Chrome will share the URLs you visit with Google, as well as usage and performance statistics for those sites so Chrome can better optimize them. Cookies for sites you visit grammarly alternative free - Crack Key For U not shared with Google. Logs are not associated with your Google Account, and all log entries are removed within 14 days. Pages loaded in Incognito will not use the optimizing servers and usage and performance statistics will not be reported.

Image Compression

To save Lite Mode users data, image requests may be sent to a Google image optimization server which will fetch the image from the origin and return a compressed version to Chrome. To avoid optimizing private images, Chrome first asks Google for a list of image URLs known to be on the page according to a crawl of the site from a Google data center. Only images on that list will be sent to the optimization server. Image URLs on the page that were not seen during the Google crawl will not be optimized, and no information about those URLs will be sent to Google.

Using Chrome with a kid’s Google Account

Chrome for Android offers features to be used when signed in with a kid's Google Account and automatically signs in a kid's account if they've signed into the Android device. Chrome uses the Sync feature to sync settings configured by parents to the kid’s account. You can read about how Sync data is used in the Sign in section of this Whitepaper.

The collection and use of Chrome data in association with a kid’s Google Account are governed by the Google Family Link - Children’s Privacy Policy.

In order for the configured settings to apply to a kid’s account, Chrome does not support the following features for a kid’s Google Account: signing out of Chrome, Incognito mode, and deleting browsing history from within Chrome. Browsing history can still be removed in the Chrome section of the Google Dashboard.

By default, first party cookie blocking is disabled when Chrome is signed in with a kid’s account. Parents can go to chrome.google.com/manage/family to allow their kids to block first party cookies. However, blocking cookies signs kids out of Google web products such as Google Search or YouTube and therefore prevents these products from providing any features designed for kids’ Google Accounts.

When Chrome is used with a kid’s Google Account, information about the kid’s requests to access blocked content is sent to Google and made visible to the kid’s parent(s) on chrome.google.com/manage/family and in the Google Family Link app. If the kid’s browsing mode is set to “Try to block mature sites”, Chrome will send a request to the Google SafeSearch service for each navigation in order to block access to sites that have been classified as containing mature content.

Incognito and Guest Mode

Incognito mode in Chrome is a temporary browsing mode. It ensures that you don’t leave browsing history and cookies on your computer. The browsing history and cookies are deleted only once you have closed the last incognito window. Incognito mode cannot make you invisible on the internet. Websites that you navigate to may record your visits. Going incognito doesn’t hide your browsing from your employer, your internet service provider, or the websites you visit.

Browsing as a Guest in Chrome allows you to use somebody else's computer without modifying their profile. For example, no bookmarks or passwords get stored on their computer. Note that Guest mode does not protect you for example, if the computer you are using is infected by a keylogger that records what you type. wonderfox dvd ripper pro latest version - Activators Patch

iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite Handoff Support

While browsing in a standard (i.e. non-Incognito) session, Chrome will share your current URL with iOS 8+ to support the Handoff feature that was added in OS X Yosemite. This information is only sent to Apple devices that are paired with your iOS device, and the data is encrypted in transit.

More information is available at Apple Support, Apple Developers, and in the Apple iOS Security Guide. Chrome support for this feature can be disabled in Chrome settings.

Security Key

A FIDO U2F Security Key provides a non-phishable credential which can be used to authenticate a user. This mitigates the risk of various kinds of man-in-the-middle attacks in which websites try to steal your password and use it later.

To prevent abuse, a website is required to be delivered over a secure connection (HTTPS), and to register the security key before it can be used for identification. Once a website is registered with a specific security key, that security key will provide a persistent identifier, Leawo Prof. Media 11.0.0.1 Crack Registration Code Free of which computer it is plugged into, or whether you're in incognito or guest mode, but you must physically interact with the security key to give a website access to an identifier (by, for example, touching it, or plugging it in).

Physical Web

The Physical Web lets you see a list of URLs being broadcast by objects in the environment around you. Google Chrome looks for Physical Web devices with Bluetooth Low Energy beacons that are broadcasting URLs using the Eddystone protocol. Bluetooth signals can be received em client portable - Activators Patch 90 feet away or more, depending on signal strength and the user’s environment (although the range is often much shorter, due to obstacles and signal noise). If the Physical Web feature is enabled, Chrome sends detected URLs to Google’s Physical Web Service (PWS) via a cookieless HTTPS request. For each URL, the PWS obtains the title of the web page, filters out unsafe results, and returns a ranking based on non-personalized signals about the quality and relevance of the web page.

The Physical Web feature is available on Chrome on iOS and Android. Users will need to turn on Bluetooth to use the feature.

If Android users have location settings enabled on both their device and in Chrome, they will receive a notification the first time they are near a beacon that will give them the option to turn on the Physical Web feature. This beacon’s URL is not sent to Google’s PWS unless the Physical Web feature is enabled. Users can also enable (or disable) the feature in the Privacy settings. Once a user enables the feature, Chrome scans for nearby devices for a few seconds each time the user unlocks the mobile device in use and sends them to the PWS in order to obtain more information about the beacon. The user receives a silent notification when Chrome finds a nearby URL.

On iOS devices, users can enable (or disable) the feature in the Privacy settings or by adding the Chrome widget to their Today view in the notification center. Additionally, the feature is automatically enabled for users who have location enabled on their device, granted Chrome the location permission, and have granted Google the geolocation permission. Chrome scans for nearby devices whenever it is open in the foreground. When Chrome finds nearby URLs, users will see them as omnibox suggestions. Additionally, Chrome scans for nearby devices for a few seconds when the Today widget is displayed in the notification center.

Bluetooth

Google Chrome supports the Web Bluetooth API, which provides websites with access to google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U Bluetooth Low Energy devices with your consent.

Chrome does not let any page communicate with a device unless you explicitly consent. When a web page asks to pair with a device, Chrome will ask you to choose which device the web page should access, if any. Selecting a device for one page does not give other pages access to the device you have chosen, and does not allow that page to access other devices. Currently, permission for a page to communicate with a device is usually revoked when the page is reloaded, and is always revoked when Chrome is restarted.

Chrome data that Android sends to Google

The data collection and usage described in this section is handled by Android and governed by the Google Privacy Policy.

If the Android Backup Service is enabled on your device, some of your Chrome preferences will be saved and stored on Google servers. For Nexus and Android One devices, it glary utilities pro 5 crack - Crack Key For U described under “Back up google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U data and settings with Android Backup Service” in this article. For other Android devices, you may be able to find help by looking up your device on this page. When setting up a new Android device, you may request that it copies the preferences from a previously set up device. If you do so, Android may restore backed up Chrome preferences when Chrome is first installed. The new device only copies the preferences if automatic restore is enabled (see “Restore your data and settings” in the same article), Chrome was signed into an account when the backup was made, and the new Android device is signed into that same account.

Chrome’s backup data for a particular device may also be restored if you uninstall and then later re-install Chrome on that device. This will only happen if automatic restore is enabled and the device is signed into the account that Chrome was signed into when the backup was made.

Integration with Digital Wellbeing

If you opt-in to see sites you have visited and set site timers in the Digital Wellbeing app on Android, Chrome will report which websites you’ve visited and the length of time spent in each of them to the app. Sites visited in incognito mode will not be reported to the Digital Wellbeing app.

To continually improve the experience of Digital Wellbeing, the app will share with Google the websites that you set a timer on and how long you have visited them.

You can opt out of this feature in the Digital Wellbeing app or in Chrome’s privacy settings anytime.

Источник: https://www.google.com/chrome/privacy/whitepaper.html

Convert Password Protected PDF to Word Without Password Quickly

Out of all the electronic document formats, PDF (Portable Document Format) is one such secure and globally used file format. A user can encrypt the PDF file to restrict other users who don’t have the privilege or right to access the protected document. For users who need to access this encrypted file should enter the password in order to access them. 

What if you have forgotten the password or if the owner has missed sharing the password with you? Are you facing such an instance? Alas, you have reached the right blog, which will help you learn the process of converting password-protected PDFs to Word without a password in a few simple steps.

Before going to the solution to convert secured PDF to Word, go through the following scenario to get an idea,

“Hi Everyone! I have a PDF file and now I am able to open it. But, the file does not allow me to perform any operation due to owner level security password. As my team leader has urgently requested to make a few changes in the PDF file, I need to access the file quickly. I have read a few articles from the internet to convert password protected PDF to Word without password. But, I am a bit confused with the steps and hence I am not able to implement the same. Please advise some instant solution to export protected PDF to word document."

Manual Technique to Export Locked PDF to PDF?

In this workaround, we are using Google Chrome, which has a built-in PDF reader* and PDF writer. But make sure to carefully process the steps, as the steps are bit tricky, which may confuse you thereby the PDF file may get damaged or corrupted. 

Therefore, take care to understand and implement the following steps which will help you to smoothly convert password protected PDF file to a Word document without a password.

  • The initial step is to drag the password protected PDF into Google Chrome or right-click the PDF file>> Open With>> Google Chrome

  • After which, Google Chrome will give a prompt message to enter the document open password. For that, provide the password and hit the Enter key
  • From the File menu of the Google Chrome, click the Print option and select the destination printer as Save as PDF and Wondershare Filmora Crack 10.0.0.94 With Key the Save button 
  • This will enable Google Chrome to save the PDF file to the desired location, but without password protection
  • Now, you can easily open the PDF file, which will no longer ask you for a password to access the file
    In order to convert password protected PDF to Word without a password, open the password removed PDF file using Microsoft Word
  • For that, right-click the PDF file>> Open with>> Word
  • Once the PDF file is opened on MS Word, click on File menu and select Save as option
  • Now, provide the desired location to save the file and click on Save button 
  • This approach will help those users who are looking to export locked PDF to Word without password 

Note: This method is only applicable if your print option is enabled. Otherwise, you need to use a third-party solution.

Quickly Convert Password Protected PDF to Word Without Password

No doubt, PDF files have the ability to maintain the document formatting, no matter where the file is opened. Does the above method fail when the print option is disabled? Then, just relax as we are going to introduce a standalone piece of software I.e., PDF File Security Remover

This will help to unlock the owner password from the PDF file in just a few simple clicks. After removing PDF file security, save the PDF file to Word format. This tool is packed with endless features that allow you to remove both user level and owner level password security from the PDF file. The best part is, this tool is available for both Windows and Mac OS.

Some Outstanding Characteristics of the Tool

  • Capable to Remove restrictions like, to print, copy, edit, page extraction
  • Successfully removes known user level and owner level security from the PDF 
  • Facilitates with an option that helps to crack PDF comment protection
  • Does not require Adobe Acrobat Installation in removing the passwords 
  • Efficient enough to remove document assembly restriction from the PDF 
  • Easily removes signature restrictions and also enables form filling 
  • Unlocks PDF file in batch for Business and Enterprise license users

Quick Steps of PDF Unlocker Tool for Windows OS

  • To begin with, download and install PDF Security Remover software for Windows on your system 
  • Then, click on the Unlock button to initiate the conversion process 

  • Under Unlock PDF File wizard, click the Browse button and provide the source path of the protected file to convert password protected PDF to Word without password 

  • When the read-only PDF file is loaded, the tool displays all the respective PDF restrictions 
  • Click on the Browse button to save the password removed PDF file to the destination location and click on Unlock PDF

  • Once the restrictions are removed, a complete comparison of the protected file before and after the unlocking process is displayed as shown below 

  • Now, the password removed PDF file is saved at the desired location.
  • Now, users can easily convert it into MS Word format.

Time to Conclude

Most PDF documents are password protected, hence there arises a need to remove passwords Backup4all 9.1 Build 369 Crack With Activation Key Free Download 2021 a PDF file. This blog has described both the manual and the automated solution that can swiftly convert password protected PDF to Word without a password. 

To perform the manual method, a user must have a PDF document in which print option is enabled and must be technically skilled so as to easily unprotect the PDF file. If you are finding the manual steps difficult, then simply switch to the tool that is induced with numerous dynamic features to export locked PDF to Word without a password.

Источник: https://www.experts-exchange.com/articles/33310/Convert-Password-Protected-PDF-to-Word-Without-Password-Quickly.html

New features available with macOS Monterey.

macOS Monterey builds on the same powerful foundation as macOS Big Sur, while offering distinct experiences designed just for the capabilities of Mac.

Learn how to upgrade

SharePlay: Watch together

Bring movies and TV shows into your FaceTime calls and enjoy rich, real-time connection with your friends while watching the same videos.

SharePlay: Listen together

Share music with your friends right in your FaceTime calls.

SharePlay: Share your screen

Share your screen to bring web pages, apps, and more into your conversation on FaceTime.

SharePlay: Synced playback

Pause, rewind, fast-forward, or jump to a different scene — everyone’s playback remains in perfect sync.

SharePlay: Shared music queue

When listening together, anyone in the call can add songs to the shared queue.

SharePlay: Smart volume

Dynamically responsive volume controls automatically adjust audio so you can hear your friends even during a loud scene or climactic chorus.

SharePlay: Multiple device support

Connect over FaceTime on your Mac while watching video on your Apple TV or listening to music on your HomePod.

SharePlay: Connect through audio, video, and text

Access your group’s Messages thread right from the FaceTime controls and choose the mode of communication that matches the moment.

Portrait mode

Inspired by the portraits you take in the Camera app, Portrait mode in FaceTime blurs your background and puts the focus on you.

Grid view

Lets you see people in your Group FaceTime calls in the same-size tiles, and highlights the current speaker so it’s easy to know who’s talking. You’ll see up to 18 faces in the grid at a time.

Spatial audio

Creates a sound field that helps conversations flow as easily as they do face to face. Your friends’ voices are spread out to sound like they’re coming from the direction in which they’re positioned on the call.

Voice Isolation mode

This microphone mode spotlights your voice by using machine learning to identify ambient noises and block them out. So a leaf blower outside or a dog barking in the next room won’t interrupt your call.

Wide Spectrum mode

This microphone mode brings every single sound into your call. It’s ideal for when you’re taking music lessons or want your friend to hear everything that’s happening in the space you’re in.

FaceTime links

Invite your friends into a FaceTime call using a web link you can share anywhere.

Join FaceTime on the web

Invite anyone to join you in a FaceTime call, even friends who don’t have an Apple device. They can join you for one-on-one and Group FaceTime calls right from their browser instantly — no login necessary.

Calendar integration

Generate a web link for a FaceTime call while creating an event in Calendar, so everyone knows exactly where to meet and when.

Shared with You

Content sent to you over Messages automatically appears in a new Shared with You section in the corresponding app, so you can enjoy it when it’s convenient for you. Shared with You will be featured in Photos, Safari, Apple News, Apple Podcasts, and the Apple TV app.

Shared with You: Pins

For content that’s especially interesting to you, you can quickly pin it in Messages, and it will be elevated in Shared with You, Messages search, and the Details view of the conversation.

Shared with You: Continue the conversation

Alongside shared content in the corresponding apps, you can see who sent it, and with a click, open the associated conversation in Messages — so you can continue the conversation while you’re enjoying what was shared with you.

Shared with You: Photos

Photos sent to you over Messages automatically appear in your Photos app. Your library includes the photos you care about most — like the ones you were there for. And the broader set of shared photos will be featured in a new Shared with You section in the sidebar.

Shared with You: Safari

Interesting articles, recipes, and other links sent over Messages automatically appear in the new Shared with You section on the Safari start page and in the sidebar. Articles that can be found in Safari and Apple News conveniently appear in Shared with You in both apps — so you can enjoy them in either place.

Shared with You: Apple News

Interesting stories sent over Messages automatically appear in the new Shared with You section in the Today feed and in the sidebar of Apple News. Stories found in News and Safari appear in Shared with You in both apps — so you can enjoy them in either place.

Shared with You: Apple Podcasts

Podcast shows and episodes sent over Messages automatically appear in the new Shared with You section of Listen Now in Apple Podcasts.

Shared with You: Apple TV app

Movies and shows sent over Messages automatically appear in the new Shared with You section of Watch Now in the Apple TV app.

Photo collections

Enjoy multiple photos as beautiful collections in your Messages conversations. A handful of images appears as a glanceable collage and a larger set as an elegant stack that you can flip through. Click to view them as a grid and easily add a Tapback or inline reply.

Easily save photos

You can quickly save photos sent to you by clicking a new save button right in the Messages conversation.

Tab Groups

Save and organize your tabs in the way that works best for you. Switch between Tab Groups using the redesigned sidebar or drop-down menu. Tab Groups sync across devices so you have access to your tabs from anywhere.

Redesigned sidebar

Manage your Tab Groups, bookmarks, Reading List, and Shared with You links in the redesigned sidebar.

Compact tab bar

The compact tab bar integrates the Smart Search field into your active tab, giving you more space to browse.

New privacy protections

Intelligent Tracking Prevention now also prevents trackers from profiling you using your IP address.

HTTPS upgrade

Safari automatically upgrades sites known to support HTTPS from insecure HTTP.

Focus

Match your devices to your mindset with Focus. Automatically filter notifications based on what you’re currently doing. Turn on Do Not Disturb to switch everything off, or choose from a suggested Focus for work, personal time, sleep, fitness, gaming, reading, or driving.

Focus customization

Create a custom Focus to filter notifications based on what you’re currently doing.

Focus across your devices

When you use a Focus on one device, it’s automatically set on your other devices.

Allowed interruptions

Set allowed interruptions so that the most important notifications from people or apps will get through to you while you’re focusing.

Status

Contacts outside the notifications you allow for a Focus will be told that your notifications are silenced. Your status appears the moment someone tries to contact you in Messages, so they know not to interrupt.

Auto-reply

Turn on a standard auto-reply for your contacts when they message you while you’re focusing.

Urgent messages

If someone’s status is turned on, signaling that they have notifications silenced with Focus, you can break through with an urgent message. If you’re on the receiving end, you can prevent an app or person from breaking through.

Status API

For conversations in third-party messaging apps, developers can use your status to reflect that you’ve stepped away.

New look for notifications

Notifications have a fresh new look, with contact photos for people and larger icons for apps.

Mute notifications

Mute any app or messaging thread temporarily, for the next hour, or for the day.

Muting suggestions

If a thread is really active and you aren’t engaging with it, you’ll get a suggestion to mute it.

Communication notifications

Notifications from people across your communication apps now feature contact photos to make them easier to identify.

Time Sensitive notifications

Time Sensitive notifications from apps are always delivered immediately, so you won’t miss out on timely alerts like a fraud alert, car waiting outside, or reminder to go pick up your kids.

Notification APIs

New notification APIs for developers allow them to automatically send Time Sensitive notifications and adopt the new look for notifications coming from people.

Tags

Tags are a fast and flexible way to categorize and organize your notes. Add one or more tags by typing them directly in the note — like #activities or #cooking.

Tag Browser

The Tag Browser in the sidebar lets you choose any tag or combination of tags to quickly view tagged notes.

Custom Smart Folders

Custom Smart Folders automatically collect notes in one place based on tags.

Activity view

See what others have added to your shared note while you were away. The new Activity view gives a summary of updates since the last time you viewed the note and a day-to-day list of activity from each collaborator.

Highlights

On a trackpad, swipe right with two fingers anywhere in your note to reveal details of who made changes in a shared note. View edit times and dates with highlighted text color‑coded to match collaborators in the note.

Mentions

Mentions make collaboration in shared notes or folders more social, direct, and contextual. Type or handwrite an @ sign and the name of a collaborator anywhere in your note to notify them of important updates and link them back to the note.

Easy to access

Access Quick Note using a hot corner or keyboard shortcut.

Available everywhere

Access Quick Note from anywhere in the system. You can be using any app or in full screen or Split View.

Adaptable

Adjust the size or position of a Quick Note.

Links

Add links from an app to your Quick Note to create context. When you return to the same place in the app or website, a thumbnail of the Quick Note appears in the corner to remind you of what you noted earlier.

Persistent highlights with Safari

Keep track of websites you’ve visited by highlighting text or images in Safari and adding them directly into your note.

Use your keyboard, mouse, and trackpad across Mac and iPad

Use a single keyboard, mouse, or trackpad to work between your devices. When you move from your Mac to your iPad, the cursor for your mouse or trackpad transforms from an arrow to a round dot, automatically changing shape to the one that is best suited for the device.

No setup required

Universal Control works effortlessly — no setup required. Simply use your mouse or trackpad to push the cursor from one device toward the other until it pops onto the second device. Then you can move your cursor seamlessly between the two.

Optional continuous setup

If you use your devices together all the time and want to use Universal Control without the need to link the two using the cursor, you can set them up to work with Universal Control continuously in System Preferences.

Support for multiple devices

Universal Control works with up to three devices.

Drag and drop content between devices

Use your mouse or trackpad to drag and drop content between your devices, perfect for when you’re sketching a glarysoft malware hunter pro key - Crack Key For U with Apple Pencil on your iPad and want to drop it into Keynote on your Mac.

AirPlay content to your Mac

Use AirPlay to send content to your Mac from an iPhone, iPad, or even another Mac. View videos, edit Keynote presentations, and hear music on your Mac as it’s being played from your other device. Your Mac works with any Apple device, and it’s even easier to connect if the devices share the same Apple ID.

Mirror or extend the display

When you send content from your iPhone or iPad to your Mac, you can choose to mirror your iPhone or iPad or extend its display by using a Mac as a secondary display for apps that support it, such as Keynote and Photos.

Use as AirPlay 2 speaker

Your Mac can function as a third-party AirPlay 2 speaker, allowing you to play music or podcasts to your Mac or use it as a secondary speaker for multiroom audio.

Send wired or wirelessly

AirPlay works both wirelessly and wired using USB. A wired connection is useful when you want to ensure that there’s no latency or you don’t have access to Wi-Fi.

Live Text in photos

Text is now completely interactive in all your photos, so you can use functions like copy and paste, lookup, and translate. Live Text works in Photos, Screenshot, Quick Look, and Safari.

Visual Look Up

Swipe up or click the information button on any photo to highlight recognized objects and scenes. Learn more about popular art and landmarks around the world, plants and flowers out in nature, books, and breeds of pets.

Updated Gallery

Find new prebuilt shortcuts you can customize, made just for Mac.

Cross-device management

Build and manage shortcuts on iPhone, iPad, or Mac for any of your devices — shortcuts automatically sync across all of them.

System-wide shortcuts

Shortcuts are available throughout macOS — run them from the Finder, menu bar, Spotlight, Dock, desktop, and more.

Run iPhone and iPad shortcuts on Mac

Run compatible iPhone and iPad shortcuts on Mac with M1 or on Intel-based Mac systems with Catalyst apps.

Improved sharing

Share shortcuts as easily as sharing a link and download them for your own use without managing complicated security settings. If you’re the recipient, smart prompts allow you to share only the data you want.

Smarter Shortcuts editor

Next Action Suggestions help you complete the shortcut you’re building.

Automator compatibility

If you already use the Automator app, now you can convert your workflows into shortcuts.

Advanced scripting

Pro users can enable AppleScript and shell script compatibility.

Interactive globe

Discover the natural beauty of Earth with a rich and interactive 3D globe, including significantly enhanced details for mountain ranges, deserts, forests, oceans, and more.

Detailed new city experience

Explore cities like San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, and London with unprecedented detail for elevation, roads, trees, buildings, landmarks, and more.

New driving features

An all-new driving map helps you see traffic, incidents, and other details that affect your drive at a glance. See road details like turn lanes, bike, bus, and taxi lanes, medians, crosswalks, and much more. Plan your upcoming journey by choosing a future departure or arrival time.

Redesigned transit

The transit map has been redesigned for the new city experience and now shows key bus routes. Plan your transit journey by choosing a future departure or arrival time.

Nearby transit

Frequent transit riders can now get one-click access to all departures that are near them. They can even pin their favorite lines so that they always show up at the top if they are nearby.

All-new place cards

Completely redesigned place cards make it easy to find and interact with important information for businesses, explore details about cities, and learn about physical features like mountain ranges.

Editorially curated Guides Home

It’s now easier to discover great places with the all‑new Guides Home, an editorially curated destination where you can find Guides for places you’ll love.

Improved search

When looking for places like restaurants, you can filter your search results by cuisine or whether they offer takeout. Or you can choose to see only places that are open right now. When you move the map while searching, Maps automatically updates your search results.

User account

Maps users can now find their most used settings all in one place, including their preferred mode of transit, reported issues, favorites, and more.

Redesigned Maps contributions

With an all-new design, it’s now faster and easier to report an issue in Maps.

Recording indicator

See which apps have access to the mic on your Mac in Control Center. A new software office suite premium activation key - Activators Patch augments the camera indicator light by showing you whenever an app has access to your mic.

Beta iCloud Private Relay

iCloud Private Relay is a service that lets you connect to virtually any network and browse with Safari in an even more secure and private way. It ensures that the traffic leaving your device is encrypted so no one can intercept and read it. Then all your requests are sent through two separate internet relays. It’s designed so that no one — including Apple — can use your IP address, location, and browsing activity to create a detailed profile about you.

Hide My Email

Hide My Email allows you to create unique, random email addresses that forward to your personal inbox so you can send and receive email without having to share your real email address.

HomeKit Secure Video

Connect more security cameras than ever to record, analyze, and view your footage in the Home app. iCloud will store your recordings in an end-to-end encrypted format automatically, so that only you and people you choose can view it. None of the video footage counts against your iCloud storage — it’s part of your subscription.

Custom email domain

Personalize your iCloud Mail address with a custom domain name, and invite family members to use the same domain with their iCloud Mail accounts.

VoiceOver image descriptions in Markup

Markup lets you add image descriptions that can be read by VoiceOver. Image descriptions persist even when shared and can be read in a range of supported apps on iPhone, iPad, and Mac.

VoiceOver descriptions for PDF signatures

Add custom descriptions to new and existing PDF signatures so you can use the right signature with VoiceOver.

Improved Full Keyboard Access

Using an expanded set of keyboard shortcuts, improvements to Full Keyboard Access enable you to control everything on your Mac with a keyboard — without a mouse or trackpad.

Custom mouse pointers

Customize the outline and fill color of the mouse pointer so it’s easier to recognize when it moves or changes to an insertion point, crosshair, hand, or other shape.

Accessibility Memoji

Memoji represent more of your look and style with new customizations, including oxygen tubes, cochlear implants, and a soft helmet for headwear.

Advanced Fraud Protection

With Advanced Fraud Protection, Apple Card users can have a security code that changes regularly password recovery bundle 2019 make online Card Number transactions even more secure.

Account Recovery Contacts

Choose one or more people you trust to become an Account Recovery Contact to help you reset your password and regain access to your account.

Digital Legacy program

The Digital Legacy program allows you to designate people as Legacy Contacts so they can access your account and personal information in the event of your death.

Object Capture

Turn a series of 2D images into a photo-realistic 3D object that’s optimized for AR in just minutes using the power of Mac. Object Capture makes 3D content creation easy for all developers.

Redesigned Apple Books app

Enjoy a refreshed Avast SecureLine VPN 5.6.4982 Crack With Free Activation Code [2021] of the app that’s easier and more intuitive to use. Access features like Reading Goals, Want to Read, and Reading Now, previously available only on iOS.

Search redesign

Search results come up as soon as you start typing and will correct spelling mistakes. Enjoy personalized showcases of top books, audiobooks, and genre collections within your results. Buy directly from the Search tab to get started on your book faster.

Hello screen saver

Use a captivating new screen saver that celebrates the history and progress of Mac. Watch as the word “hello” writes on the screen in 34 different languages using a custom-designed 3D font inspired by the first Mac that debuted with “hello” on the screen. The generative screen saver follows the graceful arcs and curves of letters as it writes and selects from different camera angles and positions — ensuring that the animation feels fresh every time.

Hello desktop picture

Use the hello desktop picture on your Mac. It comes in seven different colors and changes automatically from a light to dark version based on the time of day. You can also choose to always use a light or dark still of the desktop picture.

New dictionaries for India

Bilingual dictionaries for India include Urdu–English, Tamil–English, Telugu–English, and Gujarati–English.

New thesaurus and idiom dictionary for China mainland

There’s a new Simplified Chinese thesaurus with synonyms and antonyms as well as a dictionary of idioms.

New dictionaries for Hong Kong

Dictionaries now include a Traditional Chinese–English dictionary of Cantonese colloquialisms and a Traditional Chinese dictionary of Standard Mandarin with Cantonese pronunciations.

Live locations for family and friends

See your family and friends’ locations with continuous streaming updates. This provides an immediate sense of direction, speed, and progress when viewing people’s locations.

Find My network support for AirPods

Use the Find My network to get an approximate location of your missing AirPods Pro or AirPods Max. This will help you get within Bluetooth range so you can play a sound and locate them.

Find My widget

The new Find My widget lets you add people and item location features to Notification Center so it’s easy to keep track of friends, family, and personal items from virtually anywhere.

Shortcuts

The Finder lets you save time by running shortcuts from the Touch Bar, the menu bar, and the Quick Actions menu. Run a shortcut to reduce the size of images, batch edit hundreds of PDFs, or configure your workspace setup with just a click.

iCloud collaboration folder

A new collaboration folder in the sidebar contains all shared documents and displays information such as invitation status, the person who last modified the file, and other sharing-related metadata to help you manage your shared files.

Copy enhancements

You’ll have a better sense of timing when copying files thanks to a new pie chart progress window. You can even stop or cancel a long copy session and resume it later.

Go to folder enhancements

An enhanced “go to folder” window features a new look and improved autocompletion engine to help you get to the files or folder you’re looking for more quickly.

View file path

Press the Option key while holding the pointer over a file or folder to momentarily show the path bar, so you can easily see where your file or folder is located. Control-click the path bar to take actions such as opening folders in Terminal or copying the file path. You can also Shift-click a folder to see or navigate to subfolders.

Game Center friend requests

See incoming friend requests in your Game Center inbox, which is accessible from your Game Center profile within a game or from Internet Accounts in System Preferences.

Game Center recents and groups invitations

Bring your most recent Messages friends and groups into Game Center–enabled games with the new multiplayer friend selector.

Game highlights

With a press of the share button, save a video clip of up to the last 15 seconds of gameplay using game controllers like the Xbox Series X

5 Ways to Remove Password from PDF Document For Free

Removing a password from a PDF document is easy when you have the right tools. As a matter of fact, you don't even have to know the original password in order to retrieve or reset it. This article shows you five different ways of removing the two different kinds of password protections in PDF. The first is the Open or User Password, which is used to access the document. The second is the Restrict Editing or Owner Password, which prevents editing, copying and printing of the document's contents. The article covers both scenarios - when you know the password and when you've forgotten it.

Method 1: Remove PDF Password from Adobe Acrobat Pro (Know Password)

Adobe Acrobat is the most popular tools for viewing and editing PDF files. As you might not be aware of, it can also help you remove password from PDF documents. However, you should know the password before proceeding to the steps. Unfortunately, you can only do this on a paid version of Adobe's PDF products. With Acrobat Reader, the free version, you'll only be able to see what type of protection has been applied, not google chrome to crack pdf password - Crack Key For U a password. The following guide is based on the Standard Adobe Acrobate DC and Pro DC versions. If you don't have a valid copy of Acrobate, please check the other methods in this post. There is much cheaper PDF password unlocker tool out there.

 

Step 1: Since you know the password, first open the file in Adobe Standard DC or Pro DC. You can do this from the File > Open menu or simply double-click the file if Adobe is your default application for opening PDF.

 

Step 2: Click on File again, but this time go to the Properties option, which should open up the Properties dialog box. You'll see several tabs; click on Security.

 

Step 3: Change the Security Method option to No Security. This input is required to disable your current password. Since you're already signed into the document, no further authentication is required. Just hit the OK button to confirm the action. Your file is now accessible to everyone.

 

Remove PDF Password Adobe Acrobat

 

Of course, you can only follow this process if you know the password. Also, purchasing a monthly license for the Adobe PDF software is only justified if you're going to be using it regularly. If you're looking for a more affordable option, read on.

 

Cons of Adobe Acrobat:

  • Very expensive (USD 359).
  • Need to know the password in advance.

Method 2: Remove Password from PDF via pdfelement Editor

One of the most affordable and reliable PDF editors on the market is pdfelement. Available as Standard and Pro versions, pdfelement is an ideal cross-platform utility with versions for Mac and Windows. It offers all the features of the Acrobat suite, but it costs a lot less. Moreover, there's a free trial version you can use to check out the main features. One of the strongest features of this tool is how so much functionality has been packed into a relatively clean User Interface, or UI. Fortunately, you only need Recuva Pro 1.58 Crack With Activation Code Free Download 2021 trial version to remove a known password from a PDF document. Here's the process to be followed:

 

Step 1: Once you download and install pdfelement trial version, launch the program and click on Open File…

 

Step 2: The password box will pop up, since the file is protected. Enter the Open Password (User Password) and hit Enter.

 

Step 3: This might sound counterintuitive, but if there's a Restrict Editing password applied to the document, this needs to be removed first. You can click on Enable Editing and enter the password, then hit OK to confirm.

 

Step 4: After restrictions have been removed, go to the Protect tab by clicking on it. In the toolbar, find and click on the padlock icon, which is the option for password security settings.

 

Step 5 : On this page, uncheck the boxes for both security types to remove them, then click on OK to confirm password removal.

 

Remmove PDF Password PDFElement

 

Your Open and Restrict Editing passwords have now been removed, so you can freely share or edit the file, as required.

 

Until now, we've discussed methods to remove passwords from PDF when the password is known. What if you forgot the Open password or don't know the Restrict Editing password? How do you remove password protection in such a situation? That's what we're going to talk about next.

 

Cons of pdfelement:

  • Not free (USD 79) .
  • Only able to remove restriction if password is unkown.

Method 3: iSeePassword Dr.PDF Password Recovery

PDF Editor is a great tool to remove password from PDF. However, there are much cheaper ways to only remove a password from PDF. So the third-option we are talking in here is iSeePassword Dr.Excel, a purpose-built utility to: retrieve open password and remove Restrict Editing from a PDF document.

 

It's a super-convenient tool to have when you don't know what your open password is but you don't want to change it or blank it because there are other editors for that PDF document. It uses powerful password decryption methods to quickly recover your original password and get back to you. It now comes with hardware acceleration as a standard feature, which means you can deploy your GPU and your CPU cores to do the job of password recovery much faster than ever before.

 

 

Step 1:Install Excel Password Recovery Software easeus todo backup free download - Crack Key For U Add File

Download an original copy of Dr. PDF and install it on a PC or Mac. Launch the program and click on the type of password protection to be recovered/removed. For the Open password, it's the first option. Import the file into the program using Add File option.

 

PDF Password Recovery

Step 2:Choose Recovery Type

Once the PDF was loaded into the program, you need to select a password recovery type. Currently, there are 3 attack type, described as follows:

 

Brute Force: Takes longer than other methods but is ideal for more complex passwords.

Brute Force with Mask: Essentially the same as the above, but any attribute or character that you specify here will be removed from the combination possibilities.

Dictionary: Use custom or built-in dictionaries for commonly used passwords.

 

PDF Password Recovery Import

 

Step 3:Password Recovery Settings

You have to make a few settings if Dictionary or Mask Attack was choosen. For Dictionary Attack, you need to browse the local dictionary file and import to the program. For Mask Attack, the setting options are list in below.:

 

PDF Password Recovery Config

 

Step 4:Recover PDF Password

When selecting the attack type, you can also choose whether to use your processors to accelerate password recovery. Hit Start to begin the retrieval process. When the password is found, it will be displayed on your screen. Copy it and use WebStorm 2018.2.1 Activation Code Free Here to open your document.

 

Excel Password Recovery Success

 

Note:For PDF Permissions Password

To remove the Restrict Editing password, select the second option in the Dr. PDF main screen. Add as many files as you like to the program. When done, just click on Start to instantly blank all the restrictions passwords and allow the document to be edited, copied, or printed.

 

PDF Password Recovery for Restriction

 

If you don't know the password to open or modify the file, this is the best tool you'll find. The recovery is clean, and restrictions removal is instant.

 

 

Method 4: Remove PDF Password with Google Chrome

There's also a way to do this in Google Chrome, but what it does is to save an unprotected copy of the document rather than remove or recover the password. It's a quick workaround in case you know the password but don't have access to a PDF editor in order to remove it. Here's how to remove PDF password using Google Chrome:

 

Step 1: Drag the PDF file and drop it into a new Chrome tab or window. Chrome has a built-in reader and editor for PDF that we will be leveraging for this purpose.

 

Step 2: Enter the Open password when prompted by Chrome. In the open file, go to File > Print, which will cause another window to open.

 

Step 3: In the new window, look for Destination Printer. There will be an option allowing you to “Save as PDF”, which you need to select. Confirm saving.

 

Save as PDF in Chrome

 

The new PDF file that you saved will not require a password to open. You can use any PDF editor for this, or open it again in a different Chrome tab or window.

Cons of Chrome:

  • Only applied to PDF file you know the password.

 

Method 5: Online PDF Password Remover

In a pinch, you can also try using an online service like unlock-pdf.com. Such services are widely available from a number of providers, and all of them use the highest standards of protection on their website so your uploaded document is secure. Most of the good ones will even remove your files from their servers after a specific period of time. Unlock-pdf.com is simple to use, as shown below:

 

Step 1: Open the URL in a browser window and click on the Choose File button to upload your locked PDF.

 

Step 2: Once uploaded, click on the blue Unlock File! Button. In a moment, you will be able to download an unlocked version of the document.

 

Unlock PDF Online

 

Unfortunately, this free method only works with removing the Owner password for restricted editing. You can't remove or recover an Open password using this method.

 

Cons of Online PDF Unlocker:

  • More time to break the password.
  • The content in PDF file might get leaked by remove server.

In general, online services are safe as long as their site is well-protected, but uploading your private documents over an unsecured Internet connection, like a public WiFi hotspot, is never a good idea. The best way is to use a PDF editor like Acrobat or pdfelement when you know the password, or quickly recover it with iSeePassword Dr. PDF if the password is lost or forgoten.

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Launchpad games folder

When you download a new game, it’s automatically added to the new games folder in Launchpad. You can also access and navigate the folder with a game controller.

Package detection

Using HomeKit Secure Video, your security cameras and video doorbells can now detect and notify you when a package has arrived.

Choose your term of address for Spanish

To make your device feel more personal, in Language & Region preferences you can choose how you would like to be addressed throughout the system: feminine, masculine, or neuter.

Suggestions for Cantonese and Shanghainese

Type words and phrases in Cantonese and Shanghainese more easily when using the Simplified Chinese keyboard.

New keyboard layouts

New keyboard layouts for Amharic, Assyrian, Fula (Adlam), Igbo, Navajo, Rohingya, and Syriac offer more language options.

Keyboard shortcuts for Magic Keyboard

Magic Keyboard now supports keyboard shortcuts for over 100 layouts, automatically adapting them for the layout you’re using.

On-device dictation

Keyboard dictation improves as you use your device, personalizing over time. On-device dictation helps protect your privacy by performing all processing completely offline. Dictation in search uses server-based dictation. Available in Arabic (Saudi Arabia), Cantonese (Hong Kong), English (Australia, Canada, India, Singapore, UK, U.S.), French (France), German (Germany), Italian (Italy), Japanese (Japan), Korean (Korea), Mandarin Chinese (China mainland, Taiwan), Russian (Russia), Spanish (Mexico, Spain, U.S.), Turkish (Turkey), and Yue Chinese (China mainland).

Continuous dictation

With on-device dictation, you can dictate text of any length without a timeout (previously limited to 60 seconds).

Erase all contents and settings

System PDF Annotator 8.0.0.827 Crack + Serial Key Free Download 2021 now offers an option to erase all user data and user-installed apps from the system, while maintaining the operating system currently installed. Because storage is always encrypted on Mac systems with Apple silicon or the T2 chip, the system is instantly and securely “erased” by destroying the encryption keys.

Low Power Mode

Reduces system clock speed and display brightness to extend battery life.

Automatic window resizing

Windows now resize to fit the new display as you move them from Mac to a secondary display, another Mac, or even an iPad when using Sidecar, making it easier than ever to use multiple displays.

Mail Privacy Protection

Mail Privacy Protection helps protect your privacy by preventing email senders from learning information about your Mail activity. If you choose to turn it on, it hides your IP address so senders can’t link it to your other online activity or determine your location. And it prevents senders from seeing if you’ve opened their email.

Clothing

Customize your Memoji with over 40 outfit choices to reflect your style, mood, or the season — and choose up to three different colors. Show it off using Memoji stickers with expressive body language that include the upper body.

Two different eye colors

Now you can select a different color for your left eye and your right eye.

New glasses

Customize your Memoji with three new glasses options, including heart, star, and retro shapes. Select the color of your frame and lenses.

New Memoji stickers

Nine new Memoji stickers let you send a shaka, a hand wave, a lightbulb moment, and more.

Multicolored headwear

Represent your favorite sports team or university by choosing up to three colors for headwear.

New accessibility options

Three new accessibility options let you represent yourself with cochlear implants, oxygen tubes, or a soft helmet.

Memoji on Mac login screen

Choose your Memoji for your login picture to get fun, personalized interactions — like a greeting when you log in or a “see ya later” when you log off. If you type the wrong password, it even shakes its head.

SharePlay

Use SharePlay in FaceTime to listen to music together in real time. You can pick out songs with your friends, and everyone can pause, rearrange, or skip tracks in the SharePlay queue.

Redesigned News feed

A new design makes it easier to browse and interact with your News feed. Information like publication dates and bylines are more prominent, and you can save and share stories right from the feed.

Shared with You

Interesting stories sent over Messages automatically appear in the Shared with You section in the Today feed and sidebar in Apple News. Stories found in News and Safari appear in Shared with You in both apps.

Passwords in System Preferences

Look up and manage your saved passwords for apps and websites in the new Passwords section of System Preferences.

Import and export passwords

Import passwords from other password managers to Passwords in System Preferences or Safari. You can export passwords too.

Built-in authenticator

Generate verification codes needed for additional sign-in security. If a site offers two-factor authentication, you can set up verification codes under Passwords in System Preferences and Safari — no need to download an additional app. Once set up, verification codes autofill when you sign in to the site.

Manage iCloud Passwords on Windows

Access and manage your passwords saved to iCloud from a Windows device with the new iCloud Passwords app. Included with iCloud for Windows.

iCloud Passwords extension for Edge

Easily autofill your saved passwords in Edge with the iCloud Passwords for Windows extension. Available in the Microsoft Store.

Memories: Fresh new look

Memories has a fresh new look including animated cards with smart, adaptive titles, new animation and transition styles, and multiple image collages for a cinematic feel.

Memories: Memory looks

Inspired by the art of cinematography, 12 Memory looks add mood by analyzing each photo and video and applying the right contrast and color adjustment to give them a consistent look — just as the colorists at film studios do.

Memories: Interactive interface

Click to pause, replay the last photo, skip to the next, or jump ahead, and the music keeps playing and the timing adjusts to keep the transitions on the beat. Change the song or Memory look or add or remove photos, and the adjustment happens in real time, without the need for the movie to recompile.

Memories: Browse view

View all the photos and videos from your memory in one easy-to-navigate grid.

Memories: New memory types

New memory types include additional international holidays, child-focused memories, trends over time, and improved pet memories, including recognizing individual dogs and cats.

Memories: Watch next

Memories suggests related memories to watch next after your memory finishes playing.

Shared with You

Click Shared with You in the sidebar to view photos and videos that have been shared with you in Messages. Photos taken when you were present also appear in All Photos and in Days, Months, and Years views and can appear in your Featured Photos and Memories, including the Photos widget. Save a photo to your library or respond to the sender in Messages.

Richer Info pane

Copy and paste edits to the location and date taken and learn about objects in the photo that were detected by Visual Look Up.

Faster iCloud Photos library initial sync

When you upgrade to a new device, iCloud Photos syncs more quickly, so you can get to your photo library faster.

Import photos from another Photos library

Now you can import original photos, including edits, from a second Photos library.

People identification improvements

The People album has improved recognition for individuals.

People naming workflow

Correct naming mistakes more easily in the People album.

Suggest less often

Click Feature Less to let Photos know you prefer to see less of a specific date, place, holiday, or person across Featured Photos, in the Photos widget, in Memories, or highlighted in the Library tab.

Personalized recommendations

Discover new podcasts about topics you’re passionate about. The best podcasts, personalized for you, grouped by topics you care about.

Shared with You

Share your favorite podcast episodes in the Messages app and find all the episodes shared with you in Listen Now.

Tags

Tags are a fast and flexible way to organize your reminders. Add one or more tags, like #errands, to your reminders to make them easy to search and filter for across your Reminders lists.

Tag Browser

A Tag Browser in the sidebar lets you click any tag or combination of tags to quickly view tagged reminders.

Custom Smart Office 365 download

Create your own Smart Lists to automatically include reminders that matter most to you by selecting for tags, dates, times, locations, flags, and priority. Choose more than one tag (such as #gardening and #errands) and combine them with other setting filters for more specific lists.

Delete completed reminders

Access quick options to easily delete your completed reminders.

Improved natural language support

Type more advanced phrases to create reminder settings. Try something like “Jog every other morning” for a specific, recurring reminder.

Expanded suggested attributes

Choose tags, flags, priority, and people you message with from the Quick Toolbar when creating a reminder.

Downtime on demand

Turn on downtime on demand. During downtime, only phone calls and apps you choose to allow will be available. A five‑minute downtime reminder will be sent and downtime will be turned on until the end of the day.

Neural text-to-speech voice in more languages

The latest neural text-to-speech voices are now available in more languages: Swedish (Sweden), Danish (Denmark), Norwegian (Norway), and Finnish (Finland).

Mixed English and Indic language support in Siri

Ask Siri to play your favorite song, call a friend, and more using a mix of Indian English and your native language. Nine languages are supported: Hindi, Telugu, Kannada, Marathi, Tamil, Bengali, Gujarati, Malayalam, and Punjabi.

SF Arabic system font

The new SF Arabic system font features a refined, contemporary design that is integrated with the SF font, providing a clear, cohesive reading experience.

Tips

Discover new tips for macOS, designed to help you get started or deepen your understanding of your Mac and its amazing features.

Collections

Tips are organized in collections on specific topics — from what’s new to essential must-know features to favorite genius picks from our experts. And for those new to Mac, there are tips to help you get started.

Notifications

When a new collection of tips is available, you’ll get a notification.

Personalization

To make tips more meaningful and relevant to you, macOS uses on-device intelligence to determine which collections to send and which features to highlight for you.

System-Wide Translation

Translate text by Control-clicking it and selecting Translate. Then copy the result, change the language, or replace the selected text with the translation. Using Live Text, you can translate selected text in photos.

Shared with You

The Apple TV app now helps you see all the shows and movies your friends and family have shared with you in Messages. See them in a new dedicated section called Shared with You on Watch Now and easily keep the conversation going directly from the Apple TV app.

SharePlay

The Apple TV app works seamlessly with Messages and FaceTime so you can watch your favorite shows and movies together with friends and communicate using text, voice, or video while you watch. SharePlay lets your friends join in from their iPhone, iPad, Mac, or Apple TV — so everyone can watch together wherever and however they want.

Playback speed

Speed up or slow down playback of Voice Memos recordings.

Skip silence

Voice Memos analyzes your recordings and automatically skips over gaps in your audio with a single click.

Swap out apps in Split View

Swap out one window for another in Split View. Click the green button for a window, select the option to change windows, and select any of your open windows.

Change a Split View window to full screen

When you select the option to make a window full screen while in Split View, the window expands to the size of adobe acrobat reader offline installer - Crack Key For U display and the other window previously in Split View automatically goes full screen as well.

Full-screen menu bar

You have the option to display the menu bar at all times in full screen so you can easily view the app menu and other glanceable information anytime.

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5 Comments

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