Creature Animation

19.08.2021 1 Comments

Creature Animation

My problem is animating these creatures. I have dealt with simple animations in the past with cocos2d, but nothing like this. How can I animate these creatures. Jobs» creature animation. Jobs tagged "creature animation". Fixed-Term. Freelance. Full-Time. Internship. Part-Time. Temporary. No jobs found. Click the link in our bio to and we'll see you there! ⁠ Creature Animation by AnimSchool student Nishant Greene⁠ ⁠ #animschool #animation #vfx #.

Creature Animation -

Kiwi animation by Oliver Canovas
Our master's degree animators, studying at Buckinghamshire New University, are currently working on their third animation assignment, DA703 PR1, which involves the creation of a piece of animal or creature animation, combined with a performance.

Animal and  creature animation is among the most challenging work an animator can tackle, because it involves creating believable animation - usually based on live-action reference - and also an element of anthropormisation - making the animal or creature act in a believable way, perhaps including dialogue and lipsync.

So, how should our students plan out a piece of animal or creature animation? Start by watching the 10 minute video below.

How to Plan Animal or Creature Animation


This short video ten minute explains how to block out and plan an animal or creature animation shot.

First of all - find some great reference
Live action reference is very important for creating great animal and creature animation.

Reference used to be hard to find, but nowadays there is a huge amount of material online, and not just in obvious places like YouTube.

Greenscreenanimals.comis a website dedicated to live action clips of animals, all filmed against a green screen background.  For animators, this provides us with super-useful reference for studying animal locomotion; reference which can be easily imported into Maya and used as the basis for an animal or creature performance.

Avoid Slow-Motion Reference
Try to avoid slow-motion animation. Your animation will be most likely be in real time. If you download slo-motion, you will have to re-time it, which is a pain.

Oz Gani
The Framestore Method
Framstore Animation supervisor Oz Gani explains that the secret of the Framestore animation process is "all about finding great reference". This involves filming your own reference for a shot, or - more commonly with animal and creature work - searching through YouTube to find the right clip - which can then be used to create convincing and believable animation. As animation gets more and more complex, especially in high-end VFX work, it becomes more and more important that the animator's work is rooted in real, observed locomotion and action.

Oz explains that he spends about "50% of his time searching for great reference".  Sometimes, it's a question of finding a series of clips, trimming them, editing them together, and splicing them together to create the perfect shot. This then gets shown to the client, so that the client can approve the basic moves.




The "Frankenstein Approach"
Oz Gani likes to "Frankenstein" together different bits of reference, to combine different clips of animal business and use this as reference.  He explained how he learned this technique at ILM, on The Revenant, where the animators who worked on the grizzly bear created an astoundingly realistic performance. And the secret of getting this right was all about finding the right reference.

Import the video into Premiere
Import your video into Premiere, select the best performance, and trim the edit to the frames you want. These can then be imported directly into Maya onto an image plane. If you don't have Premiere, download some free editing software.

Importing Live Action Reference into Maya
It's important to know how to import reference video into Maya, directly onto an image plane, in order to have the reference footage in the shot.  Once you have the right footage, and the right action, the shot becomes much quicker to animate.  To find out how to import live action reference into Maya to create great animation, follow this link.



Create thumbnail sketches
Draw thumbnail sketches based on the main poses. These are drawn like a comic strip, showing the main poses. The most important poses to draw first are the beginning, middle and end poses. Again, animators often like to skip this stage, but time spent planning and thumbnailing is never wasted.

leopard by Truong
Set up your scene
Select the character rig you want to use and import the character rig into the shot.  Test the rig properly so you know how it works. Does it have a full range of motion? Does it do facial expressions?

TruongCG Artist has a great range of well-made free animal and creature rigsat Gumroad.  You can also look for free rigs at AnimationBuffet.

If there is dialogue, import the line of dialogue as a wav file into your Maya timeline.

Import a set
Consider importing a set into your shot; there are lots of free sets available online at sites like Turbosquid.com. A set helps define the story you are telling, and should help make sure your shot makes sense. We now have a sense of where we are, and what the story being told is.

Create a Shot Camera
At this stage it is important to create a camera, name it "shotCamera", frame your scene and lock the camera off.

Avoid the temptation to leave your camera decisions until the end; this is a choice you should make up front. After all, you would set the camera up first of all if this were a live action shoot.



What is blocking?
What do animators mean by "blocking"? We mean the process of establishing the main key poses in a shot, using stepped curves (i.e., single poses without any smooth transitions), so that we can test whether or not the shot will work. Having a good, organised workflow is an essential part of the animator's toolkit. Long before you start making key poses in Maya, you want to plan the shot out in your head, on video, with thumbnail sketches and/or storyboards.

Blocking, and Key Poses
Now it's time to create your main poses on stepped curves in Maya: start, middle and end. This is the most important stage. Ask yourself - do you the poses make sense? Do we know what the character is thinking and feeling? Always do the first pose, then the last pose, then the middle pose.

Getting feedback
Once you have done your blocking, typically on stepped curves, showing all the key poses, post a test at the FB Classroom, and ask for feedback. Once you get notes (there are always notes), the animator adds breakdown poses - the Tween Machine is a great free plug-in for Maya that helps with this process. At this stage the animator starts to add detail, but is still concentrating on the main performance.

Spline and refine
Once I've got my poses broken down to - roughly - around one pose every four frames, I spline the shot. To see how to do that, read this blog post. Then, it's a question of refining the shot to tweak it and make it look pretty.



To see past work submitted by our Masters' degree students for the DA703 PR1 assigmment, see the animal and creature animation playlist at YouTube.

To find out more about Animation Apprentice, click here for a link to Frequently Asked Questions. To sign up for our next classroom at Animation Apprentice, follow this link.
Источник: http://animationapprentice.blogspot.com/2019/05/how-to-plan-animal-creature-animation.html

Processing

Publication Number WO/1997/014102
Publication Date 17.04.1997
International Application No. PCT/US1996/016332
International Filing Date 11.10.1996
IPC
Title
CREATURE ANIMATION AND SIMULATION TECHNIQUE
Abstract
A synthetic creature (10) in which links (26), representing limbs, are loosely connected by joints (28) to independently interact and implement the physics of everyday life-like actions (18) in a character (16). Elements of mass, positive weight (46), and negative weight (48) are independently handled to mimic the closed-loop control characteristics of real animals. The synthetic creature (10) uses intelligent appearing behaviors (20) built up out of the actions (18) and recursively arranged in a hierarchical behavior tree (72) to cooperate and compete in a run-time computer (202) to give a feeling of autonomy and awareness. Further taught is an authoring environment (200) of tools used to author the character (16), actions (18), and behaviors (20) of the synthetic creature (10), which provide author feedback and simulation testing capability at the various layers (12) of the synthetic creature (10).
Источник: https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO1997014102

BBC Will Triple Investment In Animation For Kids Aged 7–12

Future kids’ shows will lay an emphasis on local stories. “We are British-first,” said Hidalgo, “and we want to make brilliant British animated shows with U.K. cultural values that U.K. kids can find and recognize themselves in.” Hidalgo noted that only three culturally British animated shows — Mr. Bean, Horrid Henry, and Danger Mouse — were among the age group’s most watched, alongside ten international titles.

Hidalgo cited The Amazing World of Gumball, whose production she oversaw as a former creative executive at Turner, as an example of a British-made series that is more American in its sensibilities. British animation has sometimes tried to emulate American styles and ideas, with less-than-stellar results. This is the trap Hidalgo wants to avoid: “Britishness sells, blandness doesn’t.”

In the same spirit, the BBC announced the £800,000 ($1.1M) Ignite scheme in July with a view to finding “the U.K.’s next animation hit.” Hidalgo has given an update on its progress: the 1,000-odd entries have yielded a shortlist of 40. Eventually, three projects will get pilots with a view to a full greenlight.

Earlier in the year, Hidalgo announced her intention to find the country’s answer to The Simpsons. “We could set our characters in a British setting,” she said. “When I’m talking now to some of the people I’m meeting, I’m basically saying, ‘What about roast beef instead of turkey when we have a family around the table?’ Why not infuse more of our culture? Mr. Bean is fantastic and he is so British — think of the Mini.”

Image at top: “Danger Mouse”

Источник: https://www.cartoonbrew.com/business/bbc-will-triple-investment-in-animation-for-kids-aged-7-12-210683.html

Question on Creature 2D Skeletal + Mesh Animation Tool for Defold Engine

Hello,

Does Defold support ( or plan to support ) FBX Animation?
Because if what you support right now is regular bone skinning, then the more streamlined approach to get a Creature Animation into Defold is via FBX.

The Creature native runtimes also work but they perform a lot more operations other than regular bone skinning ( full on mesh deformation )

I think starting out, it is ok to support regular bone skinning first ( that means bone motors in Creature ), which means FBX should suffice. FBX is also a good idea for Defold if it happens since this means a lot of other tools can also export into it. I believe supporting industry standard formats is quite important in order for an engine to work with a variety of 3rd party tools.

On a side note, for full on mesh deformation, I recommend looking into the Alembic file format which is another industry supported standard for point caching.

Obviously I should be pushing for native Creature runtime support but I think from a broader perspective ( stepping outside of my product and taking a look from the engine’s point of view ), it makes a lot more sense to push for the standard formats first before any custom runtimes.

Cheers

Источник: https://forum.defold.com/t/question-on-creature-2d-skeletal-mesh-animation-tool-for-defold-engine/3697

Students studying animation at Gnomon are trained to capture believable and appealing performances in their characters and creatures through the application of fundamental animation concepts, software techniques, and acting skills. Coursework covers a variety of animation methods including traditional and computer, as well as technical character rigging. With a balance of foundational education and software-based technical training, Gnomon’s Character and Creature Animation curriculum offers students an in-depth skill set relevant to the demands of the industry.

  • Foundational education in traditional animation and acting
  • Technical training with a focus on tools, processes, and workflow
  • In-depth training of industry software
  • Flexibility to customize assignments to fit your desired emphasis
  • Opportunities to create and collaborate on demo reel projects
  • Various options for elective courses
  • Financial aid eligible for those who qualify
Источник: https://www.gnomon.edu/academics/digital-production/character-creature-animation

: Creature Animation

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Creature Animation -

Students studying animation at Gnomon are trained to capture believable and appealing performances in their characters and creatures through the application of fundamental animation concepts, software techniques, and acting skills. Coursework covers a variety of animation methods including traditional and computer, as well as technical character rigging. With a balance of foundational education and software-based technical training, Gnomon’s Character and Creature Animation curriculum offers students an in-depth skill set relevant to the demands of the industry.

  • Foundational education in traditional animation and acting
  • Technical training with a focus on tools, processes, and workflow
  • In-depth training of industry software
  • Flexibility to customize assignments to fit your desired emphasis
  • Opportunities to create and collaborate on demo reel projects
  • Various options for elective courses
  • Financial aid eligible for those who qualify
Источник: https://www.gnomon.edu/academics/digital-production/character-creature-animation

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Источник: https://www.indeed.com/q-Creature-Animator-jobs.html

Chris McLaughlin joined the DNEG team in 2010. He has worked on a number of projects including John Carter, Terminator Genisys, Blade Runner 2049 and Deadpool 2.

How did you get involved on this movie?

I joined Venom: Let There Be Carnage as DNEG Supervisor during pre-production. DNEG was already pitching on the show with concept art and an animation test overseen by VFX Supervisor Paul Franklin and Animation Director Aaron Gilman, showing a more visceral, aggressive style of animation in Venom.

By this time, DNEG’s Art Department had already produced a lot of concept art for Carnage, and Spencer Cook had also joined the show as DNEG Animation Director.

We immediately got to work restoring/evaluating the assets from the first film (which DNEG also worked on) and producing animation tests for Carnage, before I relocated to London where I joined Sheena [Duggal] and her team for principal photography.

How was the collaboration with Director Andy Serkis and Overall VFX Supervisor Sheena Duggal?

Throughout the shoot Andy was an absolute joy to work with, very collaborative and open to suggestion.

Sheena was very involved and made it clear to us from the very beginning that she expected us to surpass the work that had been done on the first film.

DNEG was awarded all shots with Venom (including Wraith Venom, She Venom, Mrs. Chen Venom), and 3 sequences with Carnage (San Quentin, outside Eddies apartment and the Cathedral sequence). We also designed and built the Carnage asset.

How did you organize the work between the DNEG offices and with your VFX Producer?

David Fox was VFX Producer here in Vancouver (which served as the show’s production hub). We hadn’t worked together before this show, but working alongside each other every day for the best part of 2 years, we soon got to know each other well! David is very pragmatic, and is extremely calm in the face of adversity. I was very pleased to partner with him on the show.

In terms of organizing the work, our approach was to keep specific sequences worked on in specific sites, with some key lookdev and development shots (e.g., the Carnage transformation shots) kept in Vancouver. This was a truly global show for DNEG with work being carried out in Vancouver, Montreal, London and Mumbai.

The Vancouver team, worked on the cathedral sequence, supervised by Russel Bowen, who also led the build and development of our Carnage asset. The Montreal team, worked on a variety of sequences, including the San Quentin sequence, and was supervised by Francois Lambert. The London team, supervised by Dan Pastore, helped out with a lot of the exterior cathedral shots, and some of the more demanding transformation shots. The rest of our work was done by our team in Mumbai and was supervised by Michael Grobe. Spencer Cook, our animation Director in Montreal, oversaw and reviewed all animation on the show.

I would do internal reviews with the global teams throughout the day, starting with London in the morning, then with the Canadian teams through the day, and finishing with India at the end of the day. This would be done on DNEGs internal version of RV. Meanwhile, I would also regularly be presenting and reviewing work with Sheena and her team via cineSync.

DNEG worked on the first movie. How did you enhance the Venom model since the previous movie?

The Venom model is almost unchanged since the first movie – his head has gotten very slightly larger and his shoulders and traps have gotten slightly smaller, but overall the textures and lookdev are pretty much the same. The main changes to Venom are all ‘under the hood’. DNEG’s creature pipeline has had quite an overhaul since the first film, so the rig has been updated substantially. The facial rig was rebuilt from scratch, as was the muscle system which now uses a three layer (muscle/fat/skin) soft-tissue simulation.

Did you proceed differently from the first movie on some specific aspect?

One thing that Sheena very specifically wanted to improve upon from the first film was cloth interaction, so a lot of work was put into simulating the interaction between Eddies’ costume and the Venom tentacles/wraith. This is most evident in the sequences in Eddie’s apartment, where you can really read the tentacle connection tugging on the fabric of his bathrobe.

The FX simulation of the wraith Venom caused us some headaches this time round. The animation of the wraith in the first film was really quite languid and free-flowing. In this film the animation is much more active and energetic, so we had to rework the simulation settings on the wraith so the fluids would behave appropriately. To be honest this caused us more headaches than I’d have cared for, but we got there in the end!

Can you explain in detail about the creation of Venom and Carnage?

As mentioned previously, Venom was largely unchanged from the first film. For Carnage, obviously the comics were our first port of call when looking for inspiration – it was actually very interesting to look at the variety of interpretations of the character by many different artists over the years.

An abundance of concept art already existed from DNEG and the production team’s art departments by the time I’d joined the show, and work soon began on a maquette (from Sebastian Lochmann from KM Effects) that would combine the most favored elements from all of these concepts and would serve as the hero reference for our Carnage asset. Every detail was deliberated over, from the number of teeth to how red he should be. Connective tissue that would stretch and move with Carnage’s movement (inspired by real world reference images of muscle fibers) was added into the gaps between tendons and muscles. We had to be very careful that Carnage didn’t end up looking too much like a flayed man, or too ‘Hellraiser-esque’ – I think in the end it came close, but didn’t quite cross the line.

His face and mouth were designed at an extremely high level of detail, which proved invaluable later as we had quite a few extreme close ups. Unlike Venom, Carnage’s mouth design doesn’t really allow for lips, or at least lips that could close – he has these horrific teeth that were always visible in the comics (and are a big part of the design), so we had to make sure that we had extra articulation in the flesh around the teeth and the eyes, so that the animators had something to work with when syncing to dialogue and delivering performances. I think they did a great job with all the lip syncing, and I don’t think it ended up being an issue in the final shots, but it was definitely a big worry when we started working on the creature design. The sheer number of teeth in his mouth was also a real challenge for the rigging team, who had to be able to open and close his mouth, form shapes and deliver dialogue without the upper and lower level of teeth colliding.

Ryan Woodward supervised DNEG’s build team and Paul Boyd supervised our Creature team. Lucas Cuenca modelled our hero sculpt in Zbrush (which was based on the maquette), and then transferred that to a simpler topology in Maya, with the higher level details retained in displacement maps. Grace ‘Stevie’ Stephens was our texture artist and Erik Gronfeldt was our lookdev artist. They worked incredibly hard to add some subtle variation into the base colour, a layer of subcutaneous veins and a wet, fleshy look to his skin.

Meanwhile, while Carnage’s base model was being worked on, DNEG’s creature and FX teams were devising methods to allow him to extend his limbs, grow tentacles and form weapons. The tentacles in fact were a huge technical undertaking for our animation and FX departments. Tentacles (or ropes, or chains, or any rig with a multitude of points of articulation) are notoriously difficult and slow to animate, and had tested our animation team on previous shows, but luckily by the time we had started this show, DNEG’s creature team had built a new rig that considerably sped up our tentacle workflow. This rig was used for his back tentacles, or any single tentacle that Carnage used at any time. We had multiple weapon attachments for tentacles and limbs that could be easily switched out and alternated at the animation stage. For multiple branching tentacles, which would have simply been too time consuming for the animation team to individually animate, Houdini engine (which allows us to use Houdini toolsets within Maya) was put to use to allow the animators to use a procedural method to easily manipulate multiple branches. I believe this was the first time that DNEG had used the Houdini engine within our pipeline, and it proved very successful.

Lastly, there were what we called the ‘L-systems’ tentacles, which feature toward the end of the film as Carnage is growing and spreading his mass throughout the cathedral. The idea behind these tentacles was that as Carnage grows, he uses them to increase his size and volume, and these tentacles in turn start to mimic and inhabit the environment around him. These were blocked out with larger single strand tentacles by our animators in Maya, and passed to the FX team where our Houdini setup would recursively iterate within and around that volume, building recursive branches, giving them the veiny, snake-like look as they interact with and grow upon the cathedral around them.

There really was a huge investment of time and effort that went into Carnage, but generally the feedback from fans of the character has been overwhelmingly positive, which makes it all worth it.

Andy Serkis has a lot of experience in animation. Did he ask for specific things about the characters animations?

Yes, and that experience was evident from the notes that came through from him – in general he just wanted to ensure ensuring that our characters felt believable, so we got notes on weight and performance. He also had some quite specific notes on facial articulation and lip syncs that he thought weren’t working, or for some face shapes he thought we weren’t quite hitting. So, he kindly sent through some short videos of himself delivering the lines as reference for our animators.

How did you handle the various fights between Venom and Carnage?

All the fights between Venom and Carnage happen in the cathedral sequence. Sheena and Andy worked closely with The Third Floor to produce a postvis that became the blueprint for our animation team. Ricardo Silva and Ben Wiggs, our Animation Supervisors in Vancouver took this as reference and would elaborate upon it, focusing on weight and timing, and adding secondary animation details.

Once the animation beats had been blocked out our FX team teams could start working on the interactive passes for any elements that Venom and Carnage come in to contact with in the fight and provide additional dust and atmos passes for the lighting team. All of these individual elements – animation, creature FX, destruction FX would then be refined and iterated on, and would be concurrently worked on by the lighting team and compositing teams.

Can you elaborate about the various destructions caused by Carnage?

Once the action gets going in the Cathedral sequence, there is barely a shot that didn’t require some sort of FX destruction. Tiles were ripped from the floor, pews were smashed to pieces, plastic wraps were torn, concrete columns smashed, scaffolding collapsed and a massive hole is blown through the roof(!) – all of this had to be simulated, and the resultant destruction states had to be propagated throughout the sequence for continuity. Our CG Supervisor Eve Levasseur-Marineau was (amongst many other responsibilities) largely responsible for ensuring that this remained consistent and correct throughout the sequence.

How does the dark aspect of Venom skin affect your lighting work?

Well, we had learned from the first film that lighting Venom was difficult. The biggest issue is that essentially (in CG lighting terms), as a black reflective object, Venom doesn’t really have any diffuse component, and needs to be lit entirely by reflection. This can become problematic in an environment like the cathedral interior (which had over 500 light sources populating the scaffolding which surrounded the interior space), where Venom quickly got lit up like a Christmas tree, so our Lighting Supervisor Sushant Acharekar had to ensure that the light-rigs being used allowed us to control that.

In the end we found that large soft light sources were the most useful in shaping and defining Venom’s features, and the lighting team would always output a full set of AOVs for the comp team, sometime adding an additional ‘bling’ pass (an AOV with some additional light groups) which would allow the compositing team to add further shape and definition, eye reflections and just generally dial in the look of Venom.

With such a significant specular contribution, render noise was always a concern and we were fairly reliant on DNEG’s internal denoise system for the majority of our renders.

Which sequence or shot was the most challenging?

The cathedral sequence involved multiple transformations, lots of destruction, character performances with lots of dialogue delivery, set extensions on nearly every plate shot, a huge number of full CG shots and had a considerably larger shot count than any of our other sequences. I’m incredibly proud of the finished sequence and I think it stands as a testament to just how talented this team was and how hard everyone worked.

Did you want to reveal to us any other invisible effects?

In the sequences in Eddie’s apartment, anytime you see the tentacle or wraith connecting to his orange bathrobe, the bathrobe will be a CG takeover (either fully or partially depending in the shot). It took us some time to get that looking right, and in the end, we found the best solution was to create a hair sim (with over 5 million follicles) to recreate the tiny fabrics of the toweling material.

Also, I’d really love to give some recognition to the beautiful environment created for the Cathedral sequence. The cathedral itself was by-and-large matched to the existing Grace Cathedral in San Francisco, which had been extensively surveyed during the SF portion of the shoot. The main spire was extended to be taller, and scaffolding was added both inside and out. The scaffolding was covered in transparent sheet plastic, which was a challenge to our shading and rendering team. It took a while to get the look perfected, and the complex dielectric nature of the shader meant that it was extremely time consuming to render.

The interior and exterior were both built to a high level of detail, and all the set dressing from the set at Leavesden was matched and added to. Outside, the environment team built the city beyond Grace cathedral, and populated it with street furniture, moving traffic, and moving fog layers. With the asset in place, the lighting team then built upon the on set lighting, leaning into the warm key/cool fill directional lighting devised by the DOP Robert Richardson, with additional lighting from the stained-glass windows that exist throughout the cathedral.

The compositing team (supervised by Nik Brownlee, Stu Bruzek and Eric Chan) made use of many layers of atmospherics to really make use of the depth and help really get a sense of the volume of the space.

It was a huge team effort and I think all the individual contributions from various teams across the globe come together seamlessly.

Is there something specific that gives you some really short nights?

Carnage transformations!

We knew from the outset from our experience on the first film that these shots were going to be the most difficult – there are so many elements to deal with, and in particular the change in scale is something that really needs to be imperceptible.

Our FX Supervisor in London, Federico Frassinelli, led the charge on the Carnage transformations – he had previously worked on the first Venom film and had been pivotal in defining the look of the ‘merge fight’, so he was a good fit for developing this effect. We knew that at some point during the transition from Cletus to Carnage we’d have to do a digital takeover of Woody, so an accurate digidouble was absolutely essential and was something that we began working on immediately.

As for the effect itself, we knew that it had to differ from the Venom transformation, in that Carnage’s DNA is intertwined with Cletus in a way that Venom isn’t with Eddie. So what we ended up with was a method of tearing apart Cletus from the inside out, with Carnage bursting out from within (in contrast to the Venom transformation, where Venom protectively encapsulates Eddie from the outside).

Sheena really wanted it to feel violent, as if Cletus bones were breaking apart, and we went through many, many iterations of this effect before we finalled any of these shots.

What is your favorite shot or sequence?

I have many favourite shots, but one that stands out is the ‘Vetruvian man’ shot. This is the shot where Venom throws Carnage to the rear of the cathedral – as Carnage tumbles backwards he quickly rights himself using his many tentacles, and as he is framed in silhouette against a circular stained-glass window, he then grows several more limbs and weapon attachments before hurtling towards the camera.

The shot was actually inspired by a piece of concept art done by the DNEG Art Department very early on in the show. This concept art portrayed Carnage as Leonardo da Vinci’s ‘Vitruvian man’, with multiple limbs and tentacles. The concept was immediately loved by everyone in the production team and from then on it was clear that we would eventually be reproducing this in some way in the film.

I think the final result is suitably iconic and its particularly rewarding to be able to contribute to the shot design as well as its execution.

What is your best memory on this show?

Well, it’s probably the birth of my son Callum, who arrived 5 months before the end of the show… but you’re probably more interested in hearing about memories related to the film… So, from the shoot, during one of the rare quiet moments, I got to sit and chat with legendary DOP Robert Richardson (Platoon, JFK, Casino, Once Upon a Time in Hollywood), who was more than happy to share several tales from the shoots of a few of my favorite films. For a movie geek like myself I don’t mind admitting it was quite a thrill.

From post, I have countless great memories of working with the DNEG team throughout the various sites (almost all of them of course, via a Zoom window). It was just a huge privilege to work with such a talented and dedicated group of people – even with everything thrown at us over the past 2 years they made every effort to ensure that the standard of work was as high as possible, and everyone still managed to retain a sense of humour throughout.

How long have you worked on this show?

In total, I worked on the show for nearly 2 years.

What’s the VFX shots count?

770 for DNEG.

What is your next project?

I’ve nothing lined up just yet… Right now, I’m enjoying some time off!

A big thanks for your time.

// Venom – The Birth of Carnage

WANT TO KNOW MORE?
DNEG: Dedicated page about Venom: Let There Be Carnage on DNEG website.

© Vincent Frei – The Art of VFX – 2021

Vincent Frei

Источник: https://www.artofvfx.com/venom-let-there-be-carnage-chris-mclaughlin-vfx-supervisor-dneg/

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Processing

Publication Number WO/1997/014102
Publication Date 17.04.1997
International Application No. PCT/US1996/016332
International Filing Date 11.10.1996
IPC
Title
CREATURE ANIMATION AND SIMULATION TECHNIQUE
Abstract
A synthetic creature (10) in which links (26), representing limbs, are loosely connected by joints (28) to independently interact and implement the physics of everyday life-like actions (18) in a character (16). Elements of mass, positive weight (46), and negative weight (48) are independently handled to mimic the closed-loop control characteristics of real animals. The synthetic creature (10) uses intelligent appearing behaviors (20) built up out of the actions (18) and recursively arranged in a hierarchical behavior tree (72) to cooperate and compete in a run-time computer (202) to give a feeling of autonomy and awareness. Further taught is an authoring environment (200) of tools used to author the character (16), actions (18), and behaviors (20) of the synthetic creature (10), which provide author feedback and simulation testing capability at the various layers (12) of the synthetic creature (10).
Источник: https://patentscope.wipo.int/search/en/detail.jsf?docId=WO1997014102

Download Creature Animation 64 bit for Windows 11, 10 PC. Free

Creature Animation Complete Download and Install Guide

Guide Made by Brittany David

Whats Creature Animation?

Creature Animation is a Design App for Windows 10. You can download and install it on your PC/desktop or laptop by following the below detailed guide. These instructions are valid for both 64 bit and 32 bit versions.

How to Download Creature Animation for Windows 10?

  1. First of all, Click on the green Download button placed in the first part of this page.
  2. Scroll the opened page down till you find the Download Links box. This box contains all the available official download links for Creature Animation.
  3. Now, choose your desired setup installer - online, offline, portable . itc - and click on its link.
  4. Final Step: the download will either start instantly, or you will be directed to the official publisher download page.

Download DrawPad Graphic Editor for Windows 10

How to Install Creature Animation on Windows 10?

    After you have downloaded Creature Animation setup installer, you can install it through these simple steps:
  1. Firstly, double right click by your mouse, touchpad or screen on the setup installer to start the installation. The Windows 10 smart screen will appear asking for your confirmation. Click "Yes".
  2. Secondly, follow the installation Creature Animation provided by the app and agree to its terms and coditions. Remember, most apps enable you to customize the installation, if you do not know what to choose, leave the default options.
  3. Thirdly and Finally, Wait for the installation to complete, then after you see the successful installation confirmation, Click Finish.

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How to Uninstall Creature Animation from Windows 10?

  1. Open Windows 10 settings.
  2. Now, navigate to apps section.
  3. Apps list will appear, search for Creature Animation.
  4. Click on it, then click uninstall.
  5. After that, Confirm

Is Creature Animation Free?

Creature Animation is a Free Trial software. Downloading Creature Animation is free from FilesWin.com

Is Creature Animation Safe?

Yes, Creature Animation is safe to install on Windows 10.

Official Overview

Creature is the Cutting-edge 2D Animation Software designed to add stunningly fluid animation to your digital content. Take advantage of Creature’s Directable Automated Animation Engine and powerful workflow to produce amazingly complex animation in an incredibly easy and time-efficient manner. Creature is the Creature Animation animation Tool for game developers, digital artists and web designers wanting to add that Creature Animation animated magic to make your content come alive.

Creature is currently used in both Indie and Large-scale Animation/GameDev Production worldwide, including major studios like Ubisoft, NCSoft, Bianfeng and Playstudios.

Creature will make you rethink how 2D animation is done. At Soda PDF Home Crack 12.0.186.2161 & License Code [Latest] 2021 heart of Creature lies the Directable Automated Animation Engine, an incredibly powerful technology that allows you to produce motion you might not thought had been possible with traditional skeletal animation software. Creature offers traditional tools like FK and IK chains for animation and then expands beyond that to offer you some very advanced tools: Physics Bend Motors, Automated Walk Cycle Generation, Directable Flesh/Muscle/Soft Body Dynamics, Advanced Intelligent Bone Weighting, 2D Motion Capture and much more.

Creature exports animation in multiple file formats ready to plug into your content. Easily export your animation into image sequences, sprite sheets, movie files and FBX. For additional power and flexibility, Creature allows the export of your animations into Creature’s custom JSON format. We provide Source Code for the Runtimes of most major Game Toolkits to read in and display the animations in your own work.

Check out these amazing Creature Animations running Real-time in your Web Browser! This gallery showcases the astouding power of Creature to export compact, high quality animations for delivery platforms like Web and Mobile.

Technical Details

    Main Category:DesignApp Version: Latest versionUpdate TimeSupported Windows OS: Windows 11, 10App License: Free TrialCPU Support: 64 bit and 32 BitLatest Page Update: 2021-11-11Publisher: Kestrel MoonPublisher Homepage:https://www.kestrelmoon.com

Images & Videos

Disclaimer

FilesWin is a legal software review and download website. We are against piracy and do not provide any serials, keygens, patches or cracks for Creature Animation or any software listed here.

We are DMCA-compliant and you can request removal of your software from our website through our contact page.

Источник: https://fileswin.com/creature-animation/

Free Download Creature Animation Pro 3 for Windows PC is the Cutting-edge 2D Animation Software designed to add stunningly fluid animation to your digital content.

You can also FREE download Adobe Character Animator CC

Creature Animation Pro 3 Overview

With this program take advantage Creature Animation Creature's Directable Automated Animation Engine and powerful workflow to produce amazingly complex animation in an incredibly easy and time-efficient manner. Creature is the ideal animation Tool for game developers, digital artists and web designers wanting to add that special animated magic to make your content come alive.

Creature exports animation in multiple file formats ready to plug into your content. Easily export your animation into image sequences, sprite sheets, movie files and FBX. For additional power and flexibility, Creature allows the export of your animations into Creature's custom JSON format. We provide Source Code for the Runtimes of most major Game Toolkits to read in and display the animations in your own work.

Features of Creature Animation Pro 3

  • Stunning Animations from a Single Image
  • Advanced Volume Preserving Shapes/Skinning
  • Automated Procedural Bone Creature Animation Mesh Deformation Motors
  • Path Motion
  • Wind Force Field Motors
  • Sprite Swapping
  • Image and Video Rotoscoping
  • 3D to 2D Mocap Transfer
  • 2D Motion Capture and Transfer
  • Powerful Animation Knot and Spline Editing
  • Deep AI Walk
  • Mathematical Function Scripting
  • Ghosting/Onion Skinning
  • Automated Mesh Generation, Skinning and Weighting
  • Project Versioning and Backup
  • Mesh Resolution Reduction
  • 3D Face Warping
  • Rig Import and Transfer
  • Pose Capture Library and Transfer
  • Animate using Stylus Swipes
  • GPU Accelerated High Quality Super Sampling Export
  • Talking Characters with Lip Syncing
  • Pixel Creature Animation & other Video Effects
  • Bring Keyframes to life with Motion Enhancers
  • High Performance Animation Compression

System Requirements and Technical Details

  • Supported OS: Windows 7/8/8.1/10
  • Processor: Intel i3 or above
  • RAM: Recommended 4Gb and above
  • Free Hard Disk Creature Animation 200 MB or more
Источник: https://filecr.com/windows/creature-animation/
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BBC Will Triple Investment In Animation For Kids Aged 7–12

Future kids’ shows will lay an emphasis on local stories. “We are British-first,” said Hidalgo, “and we want to make brilliant British animated shows with U.K. cultural values that U.K. kids can find and recognize themselves in.” Hidalgo noted that only three culturally British animated shows — Mr. Bean, Horrid Henry, and Danger Mouse — were among the age group’s most watched, alongside ten international titles.

Hidalgo cited The Amazing World of Gumball, whose production she oversaw as a former creative executive at Turner, as Creature Animation example of a British-made series that is more American in its sensibilities. British animation has sometimes tried to emulate American styles and ideas, with less-than-stellar results. This is the trap Hidalgo wants to avoid: “Britishness sells, blandness doesn’t.”

In the same spirit, the BBC announced the £800,000 ($1.1M) Ignite scheme in July with a view to finding “the U.K.’s next animation hit.” Hidalgo has given an update on its progress: the 1,000-odd entries have yielded a shortlist of 40. Eventually, three projects will get pilots with a view to a full greenlight.

Earlier in the year, Hidalgo announced her intention to find the country’s answer to The Simpsons. “We could set our characters in a British setting,” she said. “When I’m talking now to some of the people I’m meeting, I’m basically saying, ‘What about roast beef instead of turkey when we have a family around the table?’ Why not infuse more of our culture? Mr. Bean is fantastic and he is so British — think of the Mini.”

Image at top: “Danger Mouse”

Источник: https://www.cartoonbrew.com/business/bbc-will-triple-investment-in-animation-for-kids-aged-7-12-210683.html

Students studying animation at Gnomon are trained to capture believable and appealing performances in their characters and creatures through the application of fundamental animation concepts, software techniques, and acting skills. Coursework covers a variety of animation methods including traditional and computer, as well as technical character rigging. With a balance of foundational education and software-based technical training, Gnomon’s Character and Creature Animation curriculum offers students an in-depth skill set relevant to the demands of the industry.

  • Foundational education in traditional animation and acting
  • Technical training with a focus on tools, processes, and workflow
  • In-depth training of industry software
  • Flexibility to customize assignments to fit your desired emphasis
  • Opportunities to create and collaborate on demo reel projects
  • Various options for elective courses
  • Financial aid eligible for those who qualify
Источник: https://www.gnomon.edu/academics/digital-production/character-creature-animation

Question on Creature 2D Skeletal + Mesh Animation Tool for Defold Engine

Hello,

Does Defold support ( or plan to support ) FBX Animation?
Because if what you support right now is Creature Animation bone skinning, then the more streamlined approach to get a Creature Animation into Defold is via FBX.

The Creature native runtimes also work but they perform a lot more operations other than regular bone skinning ( full on mesh deformation )

I think starting out, it is ok to support regular bone skinning first ( that means bone motors in Creature ), which means FBX should suffice. FBX Creature Animation also a good idea for Defold if it happens since this means a lot of other tools can also export into it. I believe supporting industry standard formats is quite important in order for an engine to work with a variety of 3rd party tools.

On a side note, for full on mesh deformation, I Creature Animation looking into the Alembic file format which is another industry supported standard for point caching.

Obviously I should be pushing for native Creature runtime support but I think from a broader perspective ( stepping outside of my product and taking a look from the engine’s point of view ), it makes a lot more sense to push for the standard formats first before any custom runtimes.

Cheers

Источник: https://forum.defold.com/t/question-on-creature-2d-skeletal-mesh-animation-tool-for-defold-engine/3697

Creature Animator jobs

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Decoy Games

Boston, MA•Remote

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Источник: https://www.indeed.com/q-Creature-Animator-jobs.html

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